Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1924724 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1933
Filing dateFeb 15, 1932
Priority dateFeb 15, 1932
Publication numberUS 1924724 A, US 1924724A, US-A-1924724, US1924724 A, US1924724A
InventorsOlney Harry B
Original AssigneeCharles M Read
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete wall and method of building and finishing same
US 1924724 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 29, 1933.` H. B. oLNEY 1,924,724 q Aug. 29, 1933. H. B. oLNEY 'CONCRETE WALL AND METHOD OF FINISHING SAME 'Filed Feb. 15, 1932 s sheets-sheet 2 Patented Aug. 29, i933 i Harry B. Olney, East Chicago, End., assigner to Gnarles M. Reed, East Chicago, Ind.

14 Claims.

This invention relates to n Nprovements in concrete Walls and method of ishing the same, and it con of the matters hereinafter described and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

Tie primary object oi the invention is to provide an improved Wall of this kind and one which may be built with greater speed and at a less cost than is possible under methods as today practiced.

Another object of the invention is to provide a Wall of this kind including members employed for spacing the forms and which members may aiso act as ties for veneering prick, as well as means for holding the rei i rcing members during the pouring or the concrete.

A further object oi the invention is to pro vide a Wall of this kind nav-ing facings of insulation which provide the forms for the Wall and which iacings or forms are held in spaced relation by members that tie the veneering in place.

Still a further object of' the invention is to provide improved method oi building a Wall of this kind unich is fast and economical and ivnich insures a substantial tied connection for the veneering prick.

The above mentioned objects of the invention as well as other together with the many advantages, will more fully appear as I proceed With my specification. I

In the drawing:-

Fig, l is a vertical sectional View through a part of a brick veneered concrete Wall embodying one form of my inventioni Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional viewthrough the same as taken on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1.

Fie. 3 is a pers; ective View ci a certain bar embodying a part of the invention for holding 40 the forms in spaced relation and for tying the veneering brick to one face of the Wall.

Fig. is a detail perspective view ci a modied form of tie bar which may be advantageously employed in building the Wall.

Fig. 5 is a perspective View showing another modified form of tie bar including a different kind of reinforcing bar engaging parts. d

Fi 6 is a perspective view of a slightly modi- O ed form ci bar for use in building a brick veneered concrete Wall devoid of insulation faoing sheets.

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view through a part of brick vence-red wall in the course of erection and illustrates the manner in which a dif.e

cation February 15, i932. .Serial No. 592,914

(Cl. 'Y2- 30) ferent kind of iorm is employed in connection with the bar shown in Fig. 6.

i'ie. 8 is another verticai sectional View similar to Fig. 'ibut illustrates a finished Wall construction devoid of the facing sheets of insulation.

In general, in building up the improved Wall, I provide forms which are neld` in the desired spaced relation by transverse bars having portions ormed to receive both margins of adja- Gf cent form members. Said bars as here shown are so made to coact in securing in place, at points between said form, the reinforcing bars ior the concrete and in o e form of the invention each bar has a tongue at one end extending beyond the adjacent forni for engagement in the mortar between tivo courses ci veneering brick so as to tie them to thewall.

Preferably ,but not necessarily so, the form members employed may be sheets of insulating material, which are not thereafter removed but are left as acings ici' the wall so that the conduction of heat units through said Wall is reduced to a minimum.

Referring now in detail to that embodiment of 30 the invention illustrated Figs. l to 6 inclusive, of the drawings and especially to Fig. 3, the same shows a form spreading and veneering brick tie bar l made of flat Vstrap metal or" the desired length. At one end said is slit longitudinally to provide parts which .may be turned at right angles but in dii-ferent directions to provide an outer set oi oppositeiy yextending 'ngers 2 2. Near said fingers, there is punched from opposite sides of the bar, parts which are turned at'right angles in diiiercnt directions to provide an inner set Yof shorter iingers 3- 3 which are spaced from the ngers 2--2 a distance approximating the thickness of the form material to be usedand which will `be later referred to.

The other end of said bar is formed to provide a head d with a short iiange 5 bent at a right angle to the bar, as shown and this flange may extend upwardly or downwardly.' Near said head, I form from opposite `rgins of the bar, a set of'outer nngers 6-5 which are companions to the ngers 3-3. Preferably in said bars between said sets of fingers, are longitudinally spaced openings 8-S.

In building a brick veneered concrete Wall in accordance with one embodiment of my invention, I take one of the bars l as shown and Hatten back the fingers on the bottom side of the bar and secure it in place to the footing for the vvall.v The number of bars thus used of course,

depending upon the length ci the walls. This leaves the first or footing bar or bars with only the upwardly facing fingers. 1 then place the bottom marginal part of two form members 9 9 in the spaces between the sets of fingers 2 3 and 6 8 and then swing them into a perpendicular position. A second bar is applied to the top margin of said form members and this holds the said form members in spaced relation. It .is pointed out that when an insulated wall of this hind is desired, the form members used are preferably sheets of insulating material. When the bars are in this position, the head 4 extends a suitable distance outwardly beyond the outer form member 9.

Reinforcing rods 10 are inserted downthrough the holes 8 3 in the said bars and concrete' 11 is then poured in between the forms. In the erection of the forms and the pouring of the concrete, the veneering brick 12 may be laid, with. mortar 13 in between the outer form 9 and the brick and in between the courses of said brick, as shown in Fig. 1 or an air space may be provided between the veneer and the other part of the wall as indicated at 13a of Fig. 8.

It is pointed out that the head end 4 of th bar will come in between the courses of the bric and when said mortar hardens, the mortar not only acts to secure the bricks to each other but to the outer facing member 9 and at the same time the heads 4 are securely anchored in said mortarto tie the veneering b 1ick to the wall.

In practice the forms for one floor of the building will usually be erected but if desired, a simple course of forms may be erected and after the concrete substantially reaches the second bar, the next course of forms can be applied with their bottom margins disposed in the spaces between the top sets of lingers 1 3 andY 6 7 and then areswung into perpendicular position. Thereafter more bars l are applied to the rods 10 from their top end and slid down into place so as to engage the top margins of the form members just mentioned and concrete is then poured and the associated veneering brick are laid as before mentioned. It is pointed out that at predetermined courses, the bars 1 thus act to tie the brick to the forms and concrete, and the steps are continued preferably in the sequence mentioned until the:1 desired height of wall is attained. Thus a wall having a reinforced concrete core and inner and uter facings of insulation is provided with a veneering of brick on the outer face of the wall, all tied togetoer in an integral structure.

Instead of having the iiat bar structure shown in Figs. 1 and 2, I may twist that portion 14 of the bar between the sets of lingers mentioned as best shown in Fig. 4 so that the edges thereof are disposed perpendicularly. Such a structure eliminates the formation of voids beneath said bars during pouring oi the concrete as is apparent. To hold the reinforcing bars in place to such a bar, lingers 15 are punched out from one side of the bar to receive the reinforcing rods 10 between them after which said iingers may be bent over to engage the bar and hold it against displacement as when the concrete is being poured. Such fingers are advantageous because it is not necessary to slip the bars upon the reinforcing rods from the top ends and then slide them down in place.

As a modification of the arrangement shown in Figs. 1 and 2, so far as engagement with the reinforcing rods 10 is concerned, I may cut out a part of one margin of the bar so as to leave an opening 16, therein, with two fingers 17 17 at its open side which after the reinforcing bar is in place, may be bent down to confine said bars in said openings. Such an arrangement is best shown in Fig. 5.

Where it is not desired to provide the insulation facings for the concrete as before mentioned, I provide bars 1 such as before described, but merely cut or break. off the head end 4 close up to the outer fingers 6 7 and such a bar is best shown in Fig. 6. n building up a wall wherein the insulation facings are not desired, I set up wooden forms as shown in Fig. 7 and such forms consists merely of boards 18 engaged at their margins in the spaces between the sets of fingers 2 3 and 6 7. The concrete l1 is then poured and is allowed to set. After the concrete has set, the form boards 18 are removed and this leaves the outer lingers 6 spaced from the concrete and both sets of inner fingers 3 7 embedded in the face of the concrete. Thereafter the outer fingers 2 and that narrow part of the bar connecting them to the remainder of the bar on that side of the concrete to be the inside of the wall are broken off close up to the associated inner lingers. This may be readily done by engaging a claw hammer with said narrower part of the bar and twisting same which will cause the unnecessary part to break ofi at the desired point adjacent the lingers.

The outer fingers 6 projecting from that face of the concrete which is to be the outer face are then bent into substantially the plane of the bar.

Thereafter veneering brick l2 are laidin the usual manner to provide the dii-ferent courses of brick, the flattened out outer fingers being disposed in the layer of mortar between those courses of brick that align with the bar. Thus when the mortar hardens, the flattened out in- 4 gers 6 act to tie or bind certain courses of the veneering bick to the concrete of the wall, It is of course understood, that in building a wall as above described, the concrete may be rein- 1 forced by providing the rods 10 that may be secured to the bars in any of the manners before described, or in the following manner:-

Along each side margin of the bar near the inner lingers 3 and 7, I punch out a relatively long finger 19 which is still connected at one end to the bar. This leaves a shallow recess in the bar into which the reinforcing bar is engaged after which said long ringer 19 is partially wrapped around the reinforcing bar as best f shown in Fig. 6.

A wall built as described, has the veneering bick positively tied or bonded thereto so that a permanent veneering is attainable and one which is not liable to loosen up from the coni crete. When the wall is built with the insulation sheets as forms and these forms are left in place, it is apparent that a thoroughly insulated brick veneered wall is provided wherein heat transmission through the wall is effectively prevented.

it should also be mentioned that where the forms are left in place they not only provide insulation but also provide a suitable plaster :ase

so that any desired finish can readily be applied.

Again, even where the forms are not left in place, but are made of wood, many advantages result from the use of my invention. For example, it has been the common practice in erecting wooden forms to provide vertical X fl braces on the outer side of the form every eighteen inches.

9. The method of forming a brick veneered concrete wall which consists in erecting wall forms in spaced relation, applying a tie member to said forms to hold them in said spaced relation and which tie member includes a pair of oppositely facing iingers arranged parallel with and engaged with the outer face of one of said forms, pouring concrete between said forms, removing said one of said forms, bending both fingers or said tie members into substantially the plane of the body and spreading them slightly laterally and applying veneering brick and mortar in place with respect to said concrete from which said one of said form members has been removed so that said parts of said tie member so bent are anchored in the mortar between certain courses of the brick and tie-the same to the wall.

i0. The method oi building brick veneered concrete walls which consists in erecting wall forms in spaced relation, applying a tie member to said forms to hold them in spaced relation and which tie member includes a part engaging the outer face of one of said forms, positioning reinforcing members in place between said form members and operatively engaging them with said tie member, pouring concrete between said forms to embed said tie member and reinforcing members, removing said one of said forms after setting of the concrete, bending said part of the tie member into substantially the plane oi 'the body or" the tie member and applying veneering brick and mortar in place with respect to the concrete from which said form member has been removed so that said part of said tie member bent into substantial extension with the body is anchored in the mortar between certain courses oi the veneering brick and ties the same to the wall.

ll. The method ci building brick veneered concrete walls which consists in erecting wall forms in spaced relation, applying a tie member to said forms to hold them in spaced relation and which tie member includes an end part engaging the outer face of one of said forms and intermediate parts adapted for engagement by reinforcing rods, positioning reinforcing rods between said forms in engagement with said intermediate parts of the tie member, pouring concrete between said forms to embed said tie member and reinforcing.

members therein, removing said one of said forms, bending said end parts of the tie member into substantially the plane of the body of the tie member and applying veneering brick and mortar in place with respect to that face of the concrete from which said form member has been removed so that said end parts of said tie member bent into substantial extension with the body is anchored in the mortar between certain courses of the veneering brick and tie the same to the wall.

i2. The method oi building brick veneered concrete wall which consists in erecng wall forms in spaced relation, applying a tie member to said forms to hold them in spaced relation and which tie member includes an end part engaging the outer face or one of said forms and having a recess in one o margins between its ends and which opening may be cios-od by bendable prongs, positio 'ng a reinforcing rod in said recess and deiorming said prongs to retain said rod in said recess, pouring concrete between said forms to embed the tie member reinforcing rod therein, removing said one oi said forms and bending said end part of the tie member into substantially the plane of the body ci the tie member and applying veneering brick and mortar with respect to that face of the concrete from which said form member been removed so that said end part of the timember bent into substantial eX- tension `with the body of the tie member is anchored in the mortar between certain courses of the veneering brick and tie the same to the wall.

13. A bri i; veneered concrete wall embodying therein, a concrete wall part, insulating material on each side or said wail part, a tie member embedded in said wall part and engaged with said insulating material and veneering brick mortared in cou against insulating material on one side ci wall part, a part of said tie member extending beyond said insulating material on one side or said wall and being anchored in the mortar between said courses or bricks for tying the same to the wall part.

14. A brick veneered concrete wall embodying therein, a concrete wall part, insulating material on each'side of said wall part, a tie member embedded in said wall part and engaged with said insulating material, reinforcing members embedded in said wall part and engaged into said tie member and veneering brick mortared in courses against the insulating material on one side of said wall part, a part of said tie member extending beyond said insulating material upon said one side of said wall part and anchored in the mortar between said courses of brick for tying the same to the wall part.

HARRY B. OLNEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2523920 *Feb 7, 1946Sep 26, 1950Piatt Jesse BReinforced wall structure
US2859606 *Sep 2, 1955Nov 11, 1958Scardino Joseph PSupports for wall installed accessories
US3295287 *Jul 30, 1964Jan 3, 1967Pasquale Anthony VCurtain wall support
US3861096 *Jan 26, 1973Jan 21, 1975Emmons Harold RSpaced bar for concrete reinforcing steel mats
US4190999 *Apr 25, 1978Mar 4, 1980Hampton Ralph CLocator for vertical reinforcing bars
US4644726 *Mar 3, 1986Feb 24, 1987Wheeler Charles FSteel placement assembly
US4748785 *Feb 2, 1987Jun 7, 1988Wheeler Charles FSupport member for reinforcing steel
US4800702 *Feb 24, 1987Jan 31, 1989Wheeler Charles FSteel placement member
US4835928 *Jan 31, 1986Jun 6, 1989Scott Samuel CComposite wall construction
US4998397 *Nov 17, 1989Mar 12, 1991Orton Michael VAlignment and lateral support member for use in laying common concrete blocks
US5042218 *Sep 25, 1989Aug 27, 1991Gerald NascaRe-bar support
US5065561 *Oct 19, 1988Nov 19, 1991American Construction Products, Inc.Form work system
US5279088 *Jan 17, 1992Jan 18, 1994Heydon Building Systems International, LimitedWall structure and method of forming the same
US5337534 *Oct 28, 1992Aug 16, 1994Gerald NascaReversible foundation bolt holder
US5343667 *Jul 6, 1993Sep 6, 1994Peden Frank GForm brace
US5431368 *Mar 31, 1994Jul 11, 1995Wilde; Richard L.Tie for concrete wall forms
US5505031 *May 4, 1994Apr 9, 1996Heydon Building Systems, Inc. Of CaliforniaBuilding structure and method of use
US6113060 *Sep 1, 1994Sep 5, 2000Wilde; Richard L.Tie for concrete wall forms
US6308484Aug 5, 1999Oct 30, 2001Thermalite, Inc.Insulated concrete forming system
US6352237Nov 4, 1999Mar 5, 2002Charles J. SeverinoInsulated concrete forming system
US6821058 *Jun 24, 2003Nov 23, 2004Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc.Retaining wall block system and connector
US6857234 *Feb 26, 2003Feb 22, 2005Anthony J. GoudreauMasonry control joint guide
US6931806 *Apr 14, 2003Aug 23, 2005Timothy A. OlsenConcrete forming system and method
US7007434 *Apr 6, 2000Mar 7, 2006Erik DanielssonBuilding structure element and stiffening plate elements for such an element
US7171788 *Mar 27, 2003Feb 6, 2007Joseph BronnerMasonry connectors and twist-on hook and method
US7445192Jun 14, 2004Nov 4, 2008Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Shear wall template
US7506479Aug 17, 2004Mar 24, 2009Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Shear transfer plate
US7654052 *Sep 17, 2007Feb 2, 2010Arxx Building Products, Inc.Bridging member for concrete form walls
US8051621 *Oct 30, 2006Nov 8, 2011Michael HatzinikolasTie system and method for connecting a cementitious backup wall made in a penetrable form and a veneer wall
US8555595Sep 22, 2011Oct 15, 2013Michael HatzinikolasTie system and method for connecting a cementitious backup wall made in a penetrable form and a veneer wall
US8893452 *Feb 4, 2013Nov 25, 2014Michael HatzinikolasTie system for connecting a veneer wall to a cementitious backup wall
US8910440 *Oct 20, 2009Dec 16, 2014Carlo CalisseConnection system for prefabricated thermal break panels
US20100325998 *Feb 4, 2009Dec 30, 2010Wembley Innovation Ltd.Masonry with vertical reinforced concrete strengthening
US20110197529 *Oct 20, 2009Aug 18, 2011Carlo CalisseConnection system for prefabricated thermal break panels
DE2255086A1 *Nov 7, 1972May 24, 1973Arcadia Ets IncEinrichtung zum aufstellen von betonwaenden
EP2053173A1 *Feb 28, 2005Apr 29, 2009Stekox GmbHSupport for joint sealings
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/379, 52/677, 52/699, D08/354, D08/373
International ClassificationE04B2/86, E04B1/41
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/8652, E04B1/41
European ClassificationE04B2/86J