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Publication numberUS1924783 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1933
Filing dateJun 30, 1930
Priority dateJun 30, 1930
Publication numberUS 1924783 A, US 1924783A, US-A-1924783, US1924783 A, US1924783A
InventorsGoss Byren C
Original AssigneeGoss Byren C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical gas daylight holdup protection system
US 1924783 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 29, 1933.

B. C. G085 ELECTRICAL GAS DAYLIGHT HOLD-UP PROTECTION SYSTEM Filed June 30, 1930 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 B yron G. G066,

Aug. 29, 1933. Q G055 1,924,783

ELECTRICAL GAS DAYLIGHT HOLD-UP PROTECTION SYSTEM Filed June 30, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Even/fir: .293 ran 5. G086,

Aug. 29, 1933. B. c. G085 1,924,733

ELECTRICAL GAS DAYLIGHT HOLD-UP PROTECTION SYSTEM Filed June 50, 1930 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 &

4 l l l l &

fan 0. 6066,

Patented Aug. 29, 1933 1,924,783 a a V V V ELECTEEGAJL V GAS DAYLEGHT HQLDUP EEQTE'JTK'TPN SYSTEM Byron O. Goss, (lievelandflhio Application 31111630, 1530. Serial No. 164,992

3 Claims. (Ci.177314i) V This invention relates to electrical gas daylight hold-up protection systems, for use in pro tecting banks, stores, etc, from robbery, by discharging irritating gases, for example tear gases, into the room in which the robbery is being perpetrated. I

' The invention aims to provide'a protective system forprotecting banks, stores, etc, from robbery by distributing a number of suitable contacts at readily'accessible places, for example foot operated contacts under the desk of-a clerk, or salesman, or push buttons on the desks of employees or ofiicials of the banks, or the stores, etc, the contacts being normally concealed and readily operated In orderto avoid actuating the protection system accidentally, the system requires asuccession of contacts, for-example two .or more contacts, a later contact actuating the pro tio t m: 7 ;1,An..obje ctof' the invention is to provide a control system for discharging irritating-gases into a room during an attack by'bandits; A-further object is to provide a gas discharge jsystem that will notice; readily set in operationby accident;

Afurther object is to provide a gas discharging system that is actuated electrically, and in the circuit, of which a weak current called a supervisory current flows constantly; a current of in- ..crea'sed strength being used.- to actuate theprotection system;

A-further object is to provide anelectrically .operated gas discharge system in whicha suit- 'Vitalpoint inthe J wiring, or at theswitches or other devices in the circuit; I v

diate action willbe-taken in the matter byresponsible parties; j 1 z A {further object is to provide a gas protection circuit which requires a succession of signals be fore the important signal is given, thereby. preventing an accidental contact of a circuit closure 'from discharging the danger signal, and liber ating the gas; p A further object is to provide affreset circuit to restorethe circuit devices to their normal con ,through wire 16, tamper switch 17 gas guns ablesignal is given if a break'should occur at a tatedth sending or" the signal, whereby immedition after either an accidental signal, or after the danger signal has been given; Further objects of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art after reading the specification. V 7

In' the accompanying drawings, Fig. 1 is a diagram shmving circuit connections including actuating devices for practicing the invention;

Figs. 2 and S'inclusive aresimplified diagrams showing the successive circuit connections set in operation during the actuation of the signal system;

Figs. 9, 10, and 11, are illustrations of a gas gun and cartridge, showing details; .0

Figs. 12, 13, andl, are illustrations of details of one type of a foot control contactfand Fig. 15 isa diagram oi one fo 'm'of-visual signal, called a warning lamp? in the specification. I

The entire system of circuits illustrated 'iriFig. 1- is divided into two'groups, one group 'insolid lines, within a suitable cabinet not shown, and the other, shown in dotted lines, suitably located in the bank or store to be protected; The circuits are shown in their simplest form in Figs. 2 to 3. In Fig, 2,.the battery A is shown as supplying current to a closed high resistance or super-vised? circuit,:f1owing from the plus pole-of the battery r 5 55, 50-"ohmmagnet 19, wire 20, 1800 ohm magnet 21, 2000 ohm resistance 22, wire 23,8.5 hmmagnet-24,wire 25, to negative of battery. Owing to :thehigh resistance Qfthema'g'net'ZI, and the 2000 ohm resistance 22,- the current flowing is very weak, but is sufiicient to energize the magnet21,

and'keep the contact :26 open. Suitable push but- :tons,.fo'ot contacts,' etc.,-27 are located atdesired placesfin' the banker store. Upon closing one of :the foot contacts 27', the 1800011111 magnet 21 and 2000.0hm resistance 22 are short circuited, and the current therrflowsas indicated bythe heavy lines inFig; 3, through magnets 19 and 24 -111156- ries, providing a currentstrong enough to snap gize magnet l9which attracts the armature 2 8, 100

closingcontact 29fandlconnecting the8.5 ohm magnet 24 through wires 16, 30, 3land 25 direct .to the battery. A bell-ringing current alsofiows from the positive pole of the battery through 7 wires 16, 30,119, bell 111, contact 26, wire25, to 1 the, negative side oi the battery. The increased current flowing through wire 30, contact 29, armae ture 23, and wire 31 energizes magnet 24: thereby actuating'the armature 32 (Fig. 1) of the intermittent ieed 'glevice 100, which then turns the 10,

ratchet wheel 38 one notch and moving the arm 34 which is secured to the ratchet wheel 33, and closing a circuit through contact plate 35 and contact 36, the current then flows from the plus end of the battery through wires 16, 30, contact 37, wire 38, warning lamps 39, which are distributed in the bank, ten ohm resistance 40, wire 41, contacts 36, 34, 35, wire 25 to the negative of the battery. Upon releasing thejfoot contact 27, the magnet 21 is again energized, opening the contact 26, deenergizing magnet 19 and leaving the circuit as illustrated in heavy lines in Fig. 4,

, with the signal or warning lamps 39 burning. The warning lamps 39, shown in Fig. 15, are located on the desks of the bankclerks, also in the several ofiices, etc., andserve to give notice that afoot contact 27, or a push button, has been operated. If the foot contact or push button was.

operated by accident, the circuit may be restored to. the original condition (Fig, 2) by an operator "opening the cabinet door (not shown), which automatically opens the tamper switch 17 actuated by the door, and the operator then closing the reset switch 43 (Fig. 7) which closes the circuit through wires 16, 110, 8 ohm reset magnet 45, reset switch 43, wires 46 and 25; the reset magnet 45 attracts armature 47, Fig. 1 andpermits the spring 48 to restore the ratchet wheel 33 to its original position, breaking-the circuit 34, 35, 36,-

(Figs. 3 and 4,) and reestablishing the circuit shown in Fig. 2.

If an attack by bandits, etc., is'being made upon the bank or store, a clerk or other official of the bank, etc., operates any one of the foot contacts or push buttons 27, twice or more in succession; the first contact closes the circuits de scribed above, and illustrated in Figs. 2, 3, and 4; the final operation of the foot contact or push button 27, establishes the oircuitshown in Fig.

5, in which themagnet 241s again energized,

,drawing the armature 32, which turns the ratchet wheel 33, thereby shifting the contact arm 34 from contact 36, as in Figs; 3' and 4, to contact 50, Figs. 5and 6; a new low resistance circuitis established through wires 16, switch 17, wire 18, gas guns 55,'wires 51, 52, contact 50 wires 56 and '25 to the battery; a circuit is also established through the alarm bell 54 from wires 16, '30, 110,

53 bell54 to wire 52, contact 50, wires 56 and 25.

'Iheincreased current flowing in the circuits established by the second operation of the foot contact ,27, and illustrated in- Figs. 5 and 6, discharge the gas guns and'continuously ring the alarm 7 bell 54, which may be located outside of the building, Upon release of thefoot contact after the second or subsequent operation, the circuit shown in Fig.6 is permanently-established until'the gas guns 55 have exploded, upon which the current in wire 18is interrupted if the resistance 70 is deastroyed, but the circuit through the bell 54 remains intact, continuously sounding an alarm until anoperator opens the cabinet and closes thereset switch 43, (Fig. 7) which actuates the reset 8 ohmjmagnet 45, thereby restoring the contact'arm34 to the original position (Figl 2) as above described, the contact arm 34 breaking the circuit through the contact 50 and restoring the {circuit connection illustrated in Fig. 2. New gas cartridges are then inserted in the gas guns 55. .The above description and ratchet feed 100 show that the guns 55 are exploded on the second or subsequent contact of the. foot contact 27; how- 'ever the intermittentfeed device 100 may be made to require three successive contacts, or any desired number of successive contacts, to discharge the guns 55. l

The gas guns 55 shown in Figs. 9, 10, and 11, consist of tubular receivers 64, in each of which is placed a cartridge containing an irritating and disabling gas composition, for example a tear gas composition 66; the cartridges mounted on a socket 67 and provided with contact terminals 68. Within the socket is an electric fuse 69, and a resistance wire 70 in shunt with the fuse 69; within the socket 67 isa firing powder 71. The guns 55; are suitably mounted at desirable locations, and may be placed in a molding 72 along the counters, shown in Fig. 11, or at other suitable places and finished to be in keeping with the surroundings, so as not to be readily noticed by outside parties. When fired, the cartridges are exploded and the irritating gas liberated and and resistance wire 70 are in shunt, the wire 70 providing a permanent path for the current should the fuse 69 be defective; the wire 70 may be destroyed the firing of the gas guns 55, but is preferably so constructed and located as not to be destroyed by the firing of the gun, thereby providing a continuous and uninterrupted circuit in the event that one cartridge should be exploded before the others; the continuous circuit through the wire 70 thereby prevents an open circuit by the discharge of one gun, and maintains the current until all of the guns have been discharged.

The foot'c'ontacts 27, or push buttons, or other circuit closures, are suitably located at the desks or counters or at other desirable places. One form of a foot contact 27 is illustrated in Figs. 12, 13, and 14, and preferably consists of a metal structure '75, supported on ends 76, and containing'an upwardly or outwardly movable bar 77 controlled by the spring 105 in the switch 80, and moved by the upper movement of the foot, as shown in Fig. 13. The bar 77 is suitably swiveled, and is-provided with a pressure arm 78 which rests on'the spring. controlled plunger 79 of a suitable contact switch 30, Fig. 14, within which are mounted contact blades81, contacts 82 and spring 105. When the foot is raised, Fig. 13, the bar 77 is moved outwardly, as shown in dotted lines, thereby pressing the arm 78 against the plunger 79, which closes the contacts 81, 82, shown in Fig. 14. When in a normal position the contacts 27 are open as shown in the circuit in Fig. 2; upon making abontact once, the circuit in Fig; 3 is established; upon making a second 'eontactwith the foot contact 27, the circuits of Figs. 5 and 6 are established and .the gas guns exploded as described above. If a break should accidentally occur in any of the vital parts of the circuit, the current through the 1800 ohm magnet 21 and 2000 ohm resistance 22 would be interrupted, thereby closing the contact 26'and ring the alarm bell 111 thereby calling attention tothe fact that the protection system was out of iis iso

16, 30, 62, ammeter 63, contact 61, and wire 25. Upon releasing the button switch60, contact 61 is broken and contact 37 is reestablished, and the circuit restored as shown in Fig. 2.

1. In a daylight robbery gas protection system the combination comprising a normally closed circuit, a source of current, a high resistance, a

first relay coil, a second relay coil, and'gas guns,

rent through the secondrelay coil to connect said gas guns directly'across the source of current, whereby the gas guns will be discharged.

2. In a daylight robbery gas protection system,

the combination comprising a normally closed circu it, a-source of current, a high resistance,-a first relay coil, a second relay coil, and gas guns, all included in said circuit, circuit closers, means connecting the circuit closers across the said resistance andacross the first relay coil whereby the said resistance and coil will be short circuited when one of the said circuit closers is closed, an electric alarm, means for controlling the alarm operated by the first relay coil when said first relay coil is de-energized, step-by-step switch means, said step-by-step switch means operated by the second mentioned relay coil when the current through the second relay coil is increased by the said short circuit, a second closing of one of said circuit closers causing the second relay coil to advance the step-by-step switch means a second step to connect the gas guns directly across the source of current, whereby the gas guns will be discharged.

3. In a daylight robbery gas protection system thecombination comprising a normally closed circuit, a source of current, a high resistance, a first relay coil, a second relay coil, and gas guns, all'included in said circuit, circuit closers, means connecting the circuit closers across the saidresistance and across the first relay coil whereby the said resistance and coilwill be short circuited when one of the said circuit closers is closed, an electricialarm, means for controlling the alarm operated by thev first relay coil when said first relay coil is de-energized, step-by-step switch means, said step-by-step switch means operated by the second mentioned relay coil when the current through the second relay coil is increased by T the said short circuit, asecond closing of one of said circuit closers causing the second relay coil to advance the step-by-step switch means, a sec-' ond step to connect the gas guns directly across the source of current whereby the gas guns will be discharged, and other means to reset the stepby-step switch means to its normal position.

BYRON C. GOSS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2427901 *May 20, 1944Sep 23, 1947Walter Dorwin TeagueElectric target and circuit
US2468369 *Jul 9, 1946Apr 26, 1949Oliver Iron Mining CompanyStench warning device
US3688293 *May 8, 1970Aug 29, 1972Standard Farrington Alarm & SiAutomatic time-controlled alarm system
US4818974 *Feb 10, 1987Apr 4, 1989Fernandez James IRobbery in process warning system
EP1480002A1 *May 24, 2004Nov 24, 2004BanditTear gas generating device
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/385.1, 102/336, 340/574, 102/531
International ClassificationE05G1/00, E05G1/12
Cooperative ClassificationE05G1/12
European ClassificationE05G1/12