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Publication numberUS1925068 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1933
Filing dateDec 16, 1932
Priority dateJul 11, 1932
Publication numberUS 1925068 A, US 1925068A, US-A-1925068, US1925068 A, US1925068A
InventorsGray Milton
Original AssigneeBruce E L Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor
US 1925068 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 29, 1933.

M. GRAY FLOOR Original Filed Aug. 28, 1931 Patented Aug. 29,

v, UNITED STAT I noon Milton Gray, Memphis, Tenn, usig-nor to E. L.

Bruce tion of Delaware Company, Memphis, Tenn. corpora- Continuation of application sci-mm, 559,991, August 28, 1931, and in Canada July 11, 1932. This application December 16,1932. Serial Claims.

My invention relates to the laying of wood block floors and the like, in a layer or mastic or plastic cement, that is spread on a concrete or other'subfloor. The practice heretofore has been '5 to lay such blocks on a; subfloor by using what is known as a. hot mastic. Such mastic was heated to aliquld condition at a. temperature of about 2llll F. and then applied, while hot, to the bottom of the block by clizcping, with the object m of securing only a thin film between the subiilcor end the block, so that the bottom of the block was virtually in contact with the sucflcor. The mastic contained constituents, volatile at the hot or working temperature, and

' 5,1 2 l beccmeoverheetecl in liquefying, preparatory to applying, these were driven off and in additlcri the mastic may have become partially car- .lccuicecl, so that tile mastic would become brittle when it lied cooled curl the bond was easily larcizeri withcut any chance of rebonding. On ccccaui't oi the very mm film of mastic between the blcelz and the culrflccr, there was no cushioneilect as one wells-cu on the "floor curl the sound efiect was not appreciable. The hot rlly, where the lrlccl; is e. single ucrrow flooris not satisfactory used in connection l Wider block that is music up a piucllty oi t3 eee sluts, due to several causes. e relatively larger under area of the wider P cliigole slat block, when clipped into the hot licl 'c, clces ucl entirely covered with c, due to line icrmetlcn of air bubbles air ccclrele: and seconcl, the lerger under cc of Elle wlrler multiple slat block must coretc larger area. of suloilocr and since neither c creme are generally entirely uniform or i, the thin lict mastic, which works .e 1e there is a thin layer lcetween two surzcces close tefetliea, fails to liolcl the wider multie oreevcr, the multiple slat block requires 11 lrcmcls when clipping in hot mastic, sucking nu dipping much more cilmccli and cover- 'ccli esjecridiricly less even than with the single men-cw flooring strip or clot.

mile the mastic that l uce is particularly c c teal for use multiple slat lcloclzs, wl tzcer fict-bcclzecl or hollow-backed, it may be also with improved results for blocks of the slat type, particularly relatively large surmastic referred to was made ircm coal tar KEi'EZChES isle or slot uc to about 3 inches in width,

in place on the subiicor.

face area single slat blocks, which are sometimes as large in area. as unit wood blocks made of a plurality of slats.

While floors of the single narrow slat type laid in c. not mastic have been in successful use abroad, such fioorshave not met with much commercial success in this country, due principally to the clifierent laying conditions. Abroad, the concrete subflcor is given plenty of time in which to dry out. A more level type of concrete subfloor is also produced. Due to rapid construction methods in this country, less time is allowed for the concrete suloficor to dry out" It is generally more uneven.

The use of central heating plants in buildings in country tends to drive the moisture from the concrete subfloor into the wood floor.

In orclcr to overcome the clifilculties arising w from present day methods of building construction in this country, it has been found necessary to discard the old type of hot mestic which emplcyecl a very thin layer, for mastic that could. be irovveled cr spread on the subzlcor in a layer of eubstcritiel lrlclmess and over the more or less I green ccricsete end which would be moisture re- 8 slsting. Elie layer of mastic should be spread in c contiuucuclcyer end without any holes or spaces through which the moisture might find its way. The substcutlcltluckness oi mastic applied in such 2,- coutiriuous form fisc takes care of the ell-gilt unevenness in the concrete subfioor. v

Que or time clijects of my invention is to use a mastic having such properties as that the Wood floor is free to expend or contract when uicisture is clicorliecl or lost from the wood. In order to do this the mastic shoulcl'l'icvc certain characteristics. Since the wood floor should not be rigidly lccmlerl to the sulbfloor, themcstic should be so formulated as that it will permit the block to move under pressure from expansion or contraclion and witlicut creaking the mastic bond.

ll mastic icr suitably bending wood block floors lo the sulor'locr should hail/613118 following cherccterlstics:

1. Pemreiicrice, i. e. the mastic should maintain the desired plasticity for the life of the floor.

2. Ple-eticlty over the ordinary temperature range, l. e. block: should not crack loose from the floor when expansion of the wcccl occurs and thus produce e, loose flcorn- 3. Adhesion must he greater than cohesion, l. e. when any movement of the floor takes place, the movement should. occur in the mastic and without the mastic pulling loose from the Wood. floor or subrloor. In other words, the adhesion of the 110 mastic to the sucfloor and woocl clocks must be greater than the cohesion of the mastic itself.

4. Pressure required to move the block liorizcm tally should be less than that required to move the block vertically; otherwise the floor will buckle when any expansion of the wood takes 5. Pressuie required to block horizon tally should be less t pressure necessary to crush the fibres of the T i. This is necessan'" in order to prevent tile ig the wood at the joints.

6. The cohesion as will prevent from sliding out i -tic sl: uch.

psnsio.

While v em sloye prefer to mastic.

main of inch is sexes. are then in i mastic between vicles suficient 1 li retained m it is l have sufiicie or open up at lbs we to move, on account mastic should so substantially spread while the concrete l i tent to of this type for this can presence of fillers the e such asbestos, silica or limestone decreases proofing crepe ties of the The 1 of solizl fillers the bonding enemies even to the of These solid fillers will absorb end/or adsorb solvents in the mastic, all of which weeks the mastic down as s continuous, non-porous moss oiaggregate, hereby materially decreasing the water or moisture resisting qualities, the bonding and cohesive strength and the long life of the product from s plasticity standpoint.

The mastic should have sufficient adhesion to the surface to which it is applied to form a strong bond between these surfaces. The mastic should have the proper cohesive strength so as to hold the floor in position. If the mastic is insufficient- Iy cohesive, the blocks will slide out of place relative to the subfioor in norm -1 use. If it is too cohesive, the blocks will not move freely enough under expansion and contraction so as to avoid buckling or opening up of the floor. Aceordingly, in any movement that takes place between the floor and sulaflcoi, the material oi the mastic should flow so that the bond of the mastic with the wood floor and concrete SllbflGOl will not be broken.

By a suiteble selection of the ingredients of the mastic, I produce at mastic that loss greater cohesive strength than cohesive strength and in which these prooerties are predetermined and so relatively proportioned that the event of undue movement of the Wood blocks relative to subfiooi', tne lzcclv of the mastic will flow e cl stretch but will not pull away the block t s i cox" and thus break the bond and permit e loos raise from the subfloor.

.ihe composition of preterred 5cm; of mastic such that it be spread ortroweilecl easily scbfioor without the use of best and n creatures as low as 55 1 and it will not or creep, after spread to the re wired classes when. temperctni'e as nigh as non-aces The physical analysis of (b); follows:

Penetration T? F. 12/20 (A. Standards) Specific gravity 69 (niimmum) open cup L 5l insoluble in 86% minimum Solubilis C32 .2 .5% (minimum) Evaporation loss 50 grams hours at 325 F.

The physical analysis of (c) is as follows: Melting point (Ball ll: Ring) fill-250 F. Penetration at W" 2/8 Flash point 50 F. Solubility in CS: (not less) 99.5% Insolubility in 85% naphtha, 70% minimum The petroleum solvent has an over-point 0t 290 F., dry point 410? F. and flash point Tagliam0 bue open cup, 100 F.

composition of the said mastic being such that it can be spread without heating at temperatures as low as 55 F.

4. A floor panel or the like formed of a plurality of pieces having recesses on the underside, a subfloor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thickness spread on the subfloor and in which the pieces are laid, the said layer being of suflicient thickness so that the floor floats thereon and is substantially out of contact with the subfioor, the said mastice being substantially permanently plastic and having such predetermined adhesion as to stick strongly to the floor and subfloor and such predetermined cohesion as will prevent movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction, the said recesses adapted to receive the excess mastic, the composition of the said mastic being such that it can be spread without heating at temperatures as low as 55 F.

5. A floor panel or the like formed of a plurality of pieces, a subfioor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thickness spread on the subfioor and in which the pieces are laid, the said layer being of suilicient thickness so that the floor floats thereon and is substantially out of contact with the subfioor, the said mastic being substantially permanently plastic and having such predetermined adhesion as to stick strongly to the floor and subfloor and such predetermined cohesion as will prevent the floor from sliding out of place relative to the subfioor but will permit movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction, the composition of the said mastic being such that it can be spread without heating at temperatures as low as 55 F. and will not run or creep alter being spread to the required thickness up to temperatures as high as 115 F.

6. A floor panel or the like formed of a plurality of pieces having recesses on the underside, a subfloor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thickness spread on the subfloor and in which the pieces are laid, the said layer being of suflicient thickness so that the floor floats thereon and is substantially out of contact with the subfioor, the said mastic being substantially permanently plastic and having such predetermined adhesion as to stick strongly to the floor and subfloor and such predetermined cohesion as will prevent the floor from slipping out 0! place relative to the subfioor but will permit movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction, the said recesses adapted to receive the excess mastic, the composition of the said mastic being such that it can be spread without heating at temperatures as low as 55.

F. and will not run or creep after being spread to the required thickness up to temperatures as high as 115 F.

7. A floor panel or the like formed of blocks that are made up or a plurality of slats secured together to provide a unit having a substantially larger area than that provided by a'single slat, a subfioor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial. thickness spread on the subfioor and in which the said blocks are laid, the said layer being or sufficient thickness so that the door floats thereon andis substantially out of contact with the subfioor, the said mastic being substantially permanently plastic and having such predetermined adhesion as to stick strongly to the floor and subfioor and such predetermined cohesion as will prevent the floor from sliding out of place relative to the subfloor but will permit movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction.

3. A floor panel or the like formed of blocks that are made oi a plural ty of slats secured nently plastic and having such predetermined adhesion as to stick strongly to the floor and subfioor and such predetermined cohesion as will prevent the fioor from sliding out of place relative to the subfioor but will permit movement of the fioor due to expansion and contraction, the said recesses adapted to receive the excess mastic.

9. A floor panel or the like comprising a subfloor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thickness spread on the subfioor with an unbroken surface and in which the floor panel is laid, the said layer being of sufilcient thickness so that the floor floats thereon and is substantially out of contact with the subfioor, the said mastic being substantially permanently plastic and having such predetermined adhesion as to stick strongly to the floor and subfioor and such predetermined cohesion as will prevent the floor from sliding out of place relative to the subfioor but will permit movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction, the said mastic being free from solid fillers to provide a more moisture resistant and substantially waterproof medium between the floor and subfloor.

10. A floor panel or the like comprising a subfloor, a layer of bituminous mastic of substantial thickness, free irom solid fillers, spread on the subi'loor and in which the floor panel is laid, the said layer of mastic being moisture resistant and substantially waterproof and substantially permanently plastic and having such predetermined adhesion as to stick strongly to the floor and subfioor and such predetermined cohesion as will prevent the floor from sliding out oi place relative to the subfloor but will permit movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction, the composition of the said mastic being such 'as that it can be spread at normal temperatures.

11. A floor panel or the like termed or block that are made up of a plurality oi slats secured together to provide a unit having a substantially larger area than that provided by a single slat, a subfioor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thickness spread on the subfioor, the said mastic being free from solid fillers and. laid with an unbroken surface on the subfloor to provide a moisture resistant and substantially waterproof support and bond in which the blocks are laid and having such predetermined adhesion as to stick strongly to the floor and subfioor and such predetermined cohesion as will prevent the floor from sliding out of place relative to the subfloor out will permit movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction.

12. A floor panel or the like formed of a plurality of pieces, a subfioor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thicimess spread on the subfloor and in which the floor panel is laid, the said layer being of suficient thickness so that the floor is substantially out oi contact with the subfioor, the adhesion of the mastic to the floor and subfloor being greater than the cohesive strength of the mastic, whereby when movement of the floor relative to the Subi'loor takes place from expansion, the mastic will stretch Without pulling loose from the floor or subfloor.

13. A floor panel or the like formed of a plurality of pieces, a subiioor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thickness spread on the subfioor and in which the floor panel is laid, the said. layer being of sufiicient thickness so that the floor is substantially out of contact with the subfioor, the said mastic being characterized by a plasticity that will be substantially permanent, the adhesion of the mastic to the floor and sub iioor being greater than its cohesive strength, the pressure required to move the panel horizontally when expansion of the wood takes place, being less than that required to move it vertically and less than, the pressure necessary to crush the fibres of the wood, the adhesive strength and cu hesive strength being so relatively proportioned that in event of undue movement of the floor panel relative to the subfioor, the body of the mastic will flow and stretch but will not pull away from the fioor or subr'ioor.

i l. A floor panel or the like formed of a pill-- rality of pieces, a subfioor, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thickness spread on the subfloor and in which the floor panel is laid, the said layer being of sufiicient thickness so that the floor is substantially out of contact with the subfloor, the said mastic being characterized by a plasticity that will be substantially permanent, the adhesion of the mastic to the floor and subiloor being greater than its cohesive strength, the cohesion of the mastic being such as to pre-- vent the floor panel under normal conditions from sliding out of place relative to the subi'ioor but will permit movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction, the adhesive strength and cohesive strength being so relatively proportioned that in event of undue movement of the floor panel relative to the subfioor, the body of the mastic will how and stretch but will not pull away from the floor or subfioor.

15. A floor panel or the like formed of ,wood blocks that are made up or a plurality of slats secured together, a layer of plastic mastic of substantial thickness spread on the subfloor and in which the said blocks are laid, the said layer being of sufiicient thickness so that the floor is substantially out of contact with the subfloor, the adhesion of the mastic to the floor and sub floor being greater than the cohesive strength of the mastic, the pressure required to move the blocks horizontally when expansion of the wood takes place being less thanthat required to move it vertically and less than the pressure necessary to crush the fibres of the Wood, the cohesion of the mastic being such as to prevent the floor panel under normal conditions from sliding out of place relative to the subfioor but permit movement of the floor due to expansion and contraction, the said mastic being characterized by a substantially permanent plasticity, the adhesive strength and cohesive strength being so relatively proportioned that in event of undue movement of the floor panel relative to the subfloor, the body or the mastic will flow and stretch but will not pull away from the floor or subfloor.

MILTON GRAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2860385 *Feb 27, 1956Nov 18, 1958Harold J CohnFlooring
US4388788 *Jul 31, 1980Jun 21, 1983Penn Wood Products Co.Wood floor panel
US4416100 *Sep 4, 1981Nov 22, 1983Troendle, Inc.Modular wooden floor units and method of manufacture thereof
US4694627 *May 28, 1985Sep 22, 1987Omholt RayResiliently-cushioned adhesively-applied floor system and method of making the same
US7775007Jul 25, 2002Aug 17, 2010Valinge Innovation AbSystem for joining building panels
US7802415Jul 9, 2007Sep 28, 2010Valinge Innovation AbFloor panel with sealing means
US7926239Mar 31, 2006Apr 19, 2011Columbia Insurance CompanyFlooring profile
US8028486Jul 26, 2002Oct 4, 2011Valinge Innovation AbFloor panel with sealing means
US8033075Aug 15, 2007Oct 11, 2011Všlinge Innovation ABLocking system and flooring board
US8245477Apr 8, 2003Aug 21, 2012Všlinge Innovation ABFloorboards for floorings
US8261507May 12, 2006Sep 11, 2012Columbia Insurance CompanyFlooring profile
US8381488 *Jul 9, 2007Feb 26, 2013Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards for floorings
US8584423Jan 21, 2011Nov 19, 2013Valinge Innovation AbFloor panel with sealing means
US8720151Feb 4, 2013May 13, 2014Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards for flooring
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/390
International ClassificationE04F15/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04F15/04
European ClassificationE04F15/04