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Publication numberUS1930750 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1933
Filing dateJul 11, 1929
Priority dateJul 11, 1929
Publication numberUS 1930750 A, US 1930750A, US-A-1930750, US1930750 A, US1930750A
InventorsHart Stephen H
Original AssigneeLord & Burnham Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Greenhouse construction
US 1930750 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 17, 1933. 5 H HART 1,930,750

GREENHOUSE CONSTRUCTION OriginalFiled July 11, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet l bzvezlfoz' ,fiepIleuEHarZ Oct. 17, s HART GREENHOUSE CONSTRUCTION 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Original Filed y 1929 @r/ W/lIl/I flIIJQIZ ZOI' enEHart 3 a I; 6 Ste 1k Z5 6'] Oct. 17, 1933. s. H. HART GREENHOUSE CONSTRUCTION 3 Sheets$heet 5 Original Filed July 11, 1929 bzvelalor ,f hjolwlzliflal'i Patented Oct. 17, 1933 UNITED STATES 'GREENHOUSE CONSTRUCTION Stephen H. Hart, Irvington, N. Y., assignor to Lord & Burnham Company, Irvington, N. Y., a

corporation of New York Application July 11, 1929,- Serial No. 377,389

Renewed March 9, 1933 6 Claims. (01. 108-16) This invention relates to greenhouse construction and relates more particularly to improved features of construction so that the drip water of condensation may be readily disposed of. This invention also comprehends improved features-of construction relating to the roof bars, their supporting members and the framing of the ends. This invention further relates to improved features of construction enabling extensions and additions to the width of the greenhouse to be readily made without requiring the reconstruction or tearing down of side walls or partitions already in place.

In the construction of additional sections or units in order to increase the width of green- One of the objects of this invention is to provide an improved construction for greenhouses, particularly in the type employing a main gutter having a bottom comprising oppositely inclined portions, with a condensation drip gutter-therebe-' low, the construction being such that in the event that it is desired to widen the greenhouse by adding an additional section to the width thereof, it will not be necessary to tear down and reconstruct the glass frame constituting the side of the ori inal structure, but will permit the water of condensation from the roof bars on one side of the added section to be carried to the drip gutter of the original section merely by the removal of a longitudinally extending closing or sealing finishing strip which closes or seals a space which has been left between the bottom of the original main gutter, and the top of the glazing fascia on the side of the original section of the greenhouse. This is an important feature of construction in that it effects a considerable economy and saving in the labor and materials where anyadditional section is to be added, but yet in the original construction of the first section, the labor and material costs is not substantially increased.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved combination glazing strip and condensation gutter formed as a hollow and tubular member adapted to be mounted on the side of a main gutter, or on a sill, said member serving to perform the double function of a glass stop, and also to serve as a condensation gutter adapted to 7 receive the drip water of condensation directly from the ends of the roof bars and also from the glass between the bars and to convey the water of condensation thus collected from within the greenhouse, through the hollow portion of the tubular member to be discharged directly in the upper edge of the gutter side and having a greater portion of the area of the combined member subject to, and exposedto the temperature within the greenhouse whereby, in cold weather, the

heat from within the greenhouse, may be 0011 ducted to those portions of the sheet copper gutter exposed to the outside temperature in order to minimize thejpossibilities of formation of ice and the clogging of the drain for the water of condensation.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improvedmetal channel bar construction for seating and strengthening the usual wooden roof bar having the condensation groove therein, the improved metal bar being in such form as will apertures present a flat surface on the bottom thereofso as to' readily permit the wooden roof bar to be uniformly wedged and seated in the metal bar by a screw or the like passing through the base of the metal bar, into the wooden roof bar and to further enable the metal channel bar to be seated and secured on the fiat surface presented by a rafter or purlin without requiring the introduction of another yielding medium or member which according to prior practice, is usually interposed between the metal bar and the flat surface of the rafter or purlin in order to obtain a proper seating of the metal'bar which "supports and carries the wooden roof bars.

A furtherobject is to provide a metal bar adapted to receive the wooden roof bar having therein, and extending on the top and longitudi-v nally of the metal roof rafter in cooperative relation to an angle barhaving its ends abutting the roof rafter normal thereto, the said fixture comprising a unitary member which is so disposed as to securely clamp the three members, including the roof rafter, the roof bar and the purlin in fixed relation.

A further object is to provide an improved metal channel for a wooden roofbar, said chanand tubular sheet metal drip gutter, the end of the wooden roof bar may terminate at the edge of theroof gutter so as to permit the water of condensation from the groove in the wooden roof bar to discharge directly into the drip gutter, independent of other fixtures, but yet permit the metal roof bar supporting the wooden roof bar, to be extended to a suitable point where the fiat surface of the metal roof bar maybe fixed to the fiat surface of a support, and there secured by a bolt or the like without the necessity of using independent special brackets and fixtures.

In the accompanying drawings, certain selective embodiments of the invention are shown, for illustrative purposes only, in order to show the various features of construction which are hereinafter more fully described, and set forth in the claims. It is understood, however, that various changes and modifications may be made by the person skilled in the art, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims. In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a broken fragmentary perspective, partly in section showing the main gutter with a tubular sheet metal member and glazing strip and drip gutter, with the roof bars on one side of the main gutter showing the detachable sealing strip closing the space between the upper frame member on the side, and the gutter.

Figure2 is a fragmentary perspective, partly in section,- showing the application of the hollow tubular sheet metal combination glass stop and drip gutter employed in connection with the sill at the top of the side or gable wall and also showing the end of the roof bar with the condensation drip groove discharging directly into the drip gutter, and the metalroof bar presenting a fiat surface which is secured to the sill through an angle iron bracket or clip presenting a fiat surface.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary perspective partly in section, showing the side wall and sill of a greenhouse with a modified form of the tubular sheet metal combination glass stop and drip gutter.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary section taken on the line 44 looking in the direction of the arrows in Fig. 1, showing the relative arrangement of the roof rafter, roof bars, and the glass.

Figure 5 is a section taken on the line 55 looking in the direction of the arrows in Fig. 4.

Figure 5a is a section of wood roof bar showing a modified form of combined roof rafter and roof channel. a

Figure 6 shows diagrammatically a section through a greenhouse showing the drip gutter and detachable sealing strip on an enlarged scale for purposes of clearness, in order to illustrate, when considered in connection with Figs. 8, 7 and 9, that additional sections might be added either side of the single section shown in Fig. 6 without requiring the removal or reconstruction of either of the sides of the single section.

Figure 7 is an enlarged section taken on the line 77 of Fig. 6 showing the relative position of the parts including the main gutter with a drip gutter therebelow having the roof bars on one side of the gutter and one side of the greenhouse section at the other side of the gutter, and having the improved detachable sealing strip feature which facilitates the construction of an additional houseparalleling one or more existing units.

Figure 8 is a diagrammatic view showing certain' features of construction, such as the gutter and the related parts on an enlarged scale for purposes of clearness, in order to show diagrammatically the relative position of the parts after the additional side section has beenadded.

Figure 9 is an enlarged section taken on the line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

Figure 10 is a fragmentary sectional view on line 10-10 of Fig. 7 showing the top frame member of the side of the greenhouse and the gutter bottom thereabove in order to show the space between the under side of the gutter and the top frame member of' the side, and showing also the bracket in said opening for positioning the side of the greenhouse relative to the gutter.

Figure 11 is a side elevation of the core bar and the metal roof bar supporting the same, showing the purlin and the glass in section.

Figure 12 is a side elevation of Fig. 11 showing the wooden roof bar and the metal channel and glass in section.

Figure 13 is a view showing theroof bar, the metalroof barv channel and the roof rafter in section, and the purlin in elevation, an improved C amp memb r ls b in hown in l v n. r ho i the th membe s n pr p r r lative position. a

Figure ii is a side elevation of Fig. 13 showns the ur n. a d the l ss ti Figures 15 and 16 are sections showing a roof bar with condensation grooves therein and a modified form of roof bar and channel.

In Fig. l a gutter 1 is shown as comprising a bottom having oppositely sloping portions 23 which intersect and meet at 4 in they middle of the gutter. Preferably, a concentrating ridge 5 is provided on the bottom of the gutter in order to facilitate and insure the delivery or dropping of the water of condensation to a supplemental drip gutter 6 which is mounted below. The gutter provided with upstanding sides "7,8. Shoulders 9--l0 are preferably provided on the upper edge of the sides, 7 8 in; order to facilitate the mounting and support of a hollow tubular sheet metal member which serves the double function and purpose of a glazing strip or glass stop and a drip. gutter arranged to receive the water of condensation discharged directly from the drip groove in thereof bars, and also from the glass between the roof bars.

The hollow sheet metal member performing the double function of a glazing strip and supplemental drip gutter, is preferably formed of sheet copper which is arelatively good heat conductor. The advantage of this material being that the heat from within the greenhouse may be conducted to the portion of thetubular member exposed to the outer atmosphere, so that in cold weather, the probability of the drain apertures becoming clogged with ice is minimized. The construction of the; member, forming the combined glazing strip and drip gutter may assume various forms, but as shown, comprises a body portion generally rectangular in form as indicated by the rectan-v gular section 11 the bottom orbase 12 being seated on the upper edger13 of the gutter side. A downwardly extending leg portion 14 is formed at one side of the tubular member, which leg portion is seated in the shoulder 9 of the gutter side '7. On the top member of the tubular member a plurality of upstanding ridges 15-16 extend longitudinally of the member, the ridge 15 being spaced the bottom side of the g upright side of the drip gutter being formed by the ridge 16 which is formed as a continuation of the outer side 21 of the tubular member designated generally as 11. Instead of. providing independent specially formed outlets or downspouts to carry away the water of condensation from the drip gutter, the drip water of condensation is carried from the drip gutter 20 through drainapertures 22 which are formed at spaced intervals through the interior of the tubular members directly to the main gutter through other drain apertures 23 formed near the bottom of the side 17 of the drip gutter; the drain apertures 22-23 are in alignment or so disposed as to permit a straight instrument to be passed therethrough in order to clean such opening from obstructions in the event that they become clogged.

As shown, a part of the sheet metal tubular member extends beyond the outer vertical side of the gutter so that a relatively large surface is exposed to the heat or temperature within the greenhouse.

The main gutter is shown supported on the bracket 24 mounted on a post 25, the member 24 being provided with arms 26 extending outwardly and upward y in order to receive the gutter bottom; one of the arms is shown broken away for purposes of cl'earness. If for any reason it is desired to carry the p water of condensation to itter, a supplemental drip gutter 6 may be supported in the bracket 24 below the main gutter.

One contingency in which it might be desirable to use the supplemental drip gutter 6 in addition to the tubular sheet metal gutter mounted on the top edge of the gutter side, would be where it is desired to add an additional section at the side of the section first constructed and to do this with ut the necessity of another tubular sheet metal drip gutter mounted on the top edge of the other side of the main gutter. Where the sheet metal tubular member is employed which performs the double function of a glazing strip and drip gutter, a gutter having either a flat bottom, or a V bottom may be employed. Where a supplemental drip gutter is disposed below the main gutter, the be ..m of such main gutter isof oppositely inclined portions.

carry away the water from two adjacent greenhouse sections having diiferent constructions,

having reference more particularly to the fram ing of the roof bar ends adjacent the gutter sides. For example, the roof bars in one section could be of the curved type as shown in Fig. 1, and the roof bars of the adjacent section on the other side of the middle gutter might be of the straight roof bar construction such as that illustrated in Fig. 7, he einafter more fully described; In one instance, the drip water of condensation would be carried to the main gutter, and in the other instance, the drip water of condensation wouldbe carried to the supplemental drip gutter below the main gutter.

In the formation of the utter in the form of the tubular member serving the double function of a glass stop and condensation drip gutter, it may be formed from a one piece tubular member having a continuous periphery, which may be subjected to the necessary series of manipulations in order to formthe substantially rectangular body portion with the depending 'leg from the bottom, and the upstanding ridges at the top; if desired, the tubularmember maybe formed of a plurality of longitudinally extending pieces of the sheet metal. If two pieces of sheet metal are used, preferably, one piece is employed to form the two sides andbottom of the drip gutter, and the second sheet if formed by one continuous piece of the proper contour and having its ends suitably secured to the ends of the first piece, as

7 shown in section in Fig. 1.

bar and the metal roof bar channel for seating and strengthening the'wood core bar. Fig. 5 is a section on line 5-5 of Fig. 4 which shows more clearly the wooden roof bar 2'? having drip grooves 28 therein. As shown, the roof bar metal channel designated generally as '29, is provided with a flat base .30 having the upwardly and outwardly ex: tending sides 31, which receive and seat the lower portion of the wooden roof bar which is correspondingly formed. In greenhouse construction, a certain number of the roof bars extending from the ridge to the cave comprise the wooden roof bar and the channel roof bar; in order to give additional strength to the'structure at certain intervals, roof rafters may be used extending below and longitudinally of the roof bars.

One of the difficulties heretofore encountered is to get a suitable seating and connection between the metal roof bar channel and the roof rafter; Heretofore it has usually been necessary to interpose an intermediate yielding strip between the roof rafter and the roof bar channel in order to maintain a proper seating and connection therebetween, and also to employ a number of additional clamps and fixtures for holding these parts in proper relation. with the present construction, the intermediate yielding member has been entirely eliminated and by employing a metal roof bar channel having a flat base or bottom therefor, it is readily adapted for mounting upon a roof rafter presenting a fiat surface extending longitudinally of the bar and is likewise equally well adapted for mounting upon purlins in'the form of angle irons presenting fiat In accordance surfaces extending transversely of and below the metal roof bar, in a manner more clearly shown N in Figs. 11 and 12. In these figures an angle iron purlin comprising the flanges 33 and 34 normal to each other, extend transversely of and below the roof channel bar 29, the flat base 30 being seated on the horizontal leg 34 of the purlin; the wooden core bar 27, and the metal roof bar channel 29, are

held in proper fixed relation by the use of a-screw 35 or the like. The metal roof bar channel 29 and the purlin are preferably secured together by a machine'screw 35 or the like. One distinct advantage in having the bevelled roof bar adapted to seat in the correspondingly shaped sides of the metal channel, is that when the securing means 35 is tightened, the effect is to exert a powerful force to draw the wooden roof bar and the metal channel bar into proper seating relation by a I wedging action, the effect of which is to cause the wooden roof bar to be evenly and uniformly seated on each side of the channel. One of the objections to the angle iron construction heretofore employed in the prior art, is that no flat surface is available on the bottom of the metal roof bar channel; this made it necessary to drill counter sunk additional holes in each of the upwardly and outwardly extending sides, the result of which was that it was impossible to get an even and uniform seating of the wood roof bar acting uniformly on both sides of the metal roof bar channel; the prior art construction frequently resulted in a close fitting and seating on one side and leaving a space on the other side of the roof bar.

As shown in Fig. 5, there is preferably employed a roof rafter having a vertical web 32 and a web portion 36, normal thereto, which web or leg portion is fiat and is substantially the width of the flat base of the roof bar channel. By having the main supporting web 32 of the roof rafter offset from the center of the roof bar, it is possible to utilize a common securing mernber 35 passing through the web 36 of the roof rafter, and the base 30 of the roof bar channel and into the wooden roof bar 27. This securing means serves to forcibly draw the three members into proper relation. If additional clamping means is de-v sired between the roof rafter and the roof channel, the clamping bracket 37,, 38 such as that shown in Fig. 13. may be employed.

As shown in Fig. 13, a roof rafter having merely the vertical web 32 is shown, on the upper fiat edge of which is seated the roof bar channel. The roof rafter 32 and the channel 29 are held in proper fixed relation by means of the cla1nping members 3''! and 38 arranged one on each side of the roof rafter and channel, these clamping members 37 and 38 being so formed as to present a hooked portion 39 at the upper portion thereof which engages the upper edge of the sides 31 of the roof bar channel so that as the clamping bolt 40 is tightened, the roof rafter and the roof bar are rigidly held in fixed relation. As shown in Figs. 13 and 14, one of the clamping members 38 is provided with a flange 41 which is normal to the body of the clamp 33 which engages the roof rafter. By means of the clamp 41, and a clamping nut and bolt 42, the purlin 33 may also be supported and held in proper fixed relation relative to the roof rafter 32 and the roof channel 29. A clamping fixture such as that shown in Figs. 13 and 14, holds in proper relative relation the three members including the roof rafter, the roof bar channel, and the purlin angle iron at that point at which the purlin abuts against the roof bars. Heretofore, in the art, a plurality of independent clamping fixtures have been employed. If desired, an additional clamping or bracket 43 may be employed for strengthening the connection between the vertical web of the purlin 33, and the roof rafter 32.

Fig. 16 shows a modified form of construction in which the roof rafter and the metal roof channel bar are formed as a unitarymember which performs the two functions of a roof rafter and metal roof bar channel. One distinct advantage of such a construction is that theproblem of effecting a connection between the roof rafter and the roof bar channel is entirely eliminated, making unnecessary the employment of any clamping means whatever. By having the vertical web 44 serving as the roof rafter, offset from the center of the roof bar, it still permits the fastening means 45 such as a screw or the like to pass through the roof bar channel into the wooden roof barso as to draw the latter into seated relation by a wedging action in the outwardly or upwardly extending sides 46 and 4'7.

Fig. 15 shows a modified form of roof rafter in which the roof bar channel is eliminated. The flat flange formed integral with the roof rafter web 44 forms a flat seat to receive the wooden roof bar. The vertical web 4.4 is offset from the roof bar center to permit the securing means as a screw 45, to be used to hold the roof bar and roof rafter in proper position.

Fig. 5a shows a modified form of a combina tion unitary roof rafter and roof bar channel. A vertical web portion 48 is shown, which serves as a roof rafter which gives strength and rigidity to the structure. The flat portion 49 is normal to the vertical web 43 and serves as a seat for receiving'the base of the wood core bar 27, and the upwardly and outwardly extending sides 50 function in the same manner as the 31 of the metai roof bar channel shown in Fig. 5. The usual screw 35, or the like, may be used, to pass through the flat portion 49 and into the wooden roof bar, for drawing by a wedging action between the sides 50 and base l9 into close seating relation with the combined integral and unitary roof rafter and metal roof bar channel. If desired, such a unitary and integral combination member may be formed. from an angle bar memher in which the horizontal fiange or web is thinner than the vertical web 48 which serves as the main strengthening roof rafter. If the unitary member is formed from an angle iron in which the horizontal web is thinner than, or, if

V desired of equal thickness to the vertical web 48,

the side members 50, may be readily formed by bending the end portion of the horizontal web, from a position indicated by the dotted line position, '51 through an angle to the position designated by the sides 50.

Figures 1 and 2 show more clearly the con struction and relative arrangement of the parts at the end of the roof bars, and illustrates the manner in which the end of the wood core, bar 27 terminates above the condensation drip gutter 20 formed on the upper surface of the hollow tubular sheet metal member 11, so that the water of condensation is dcharged directly from the condensation drip gro .e in the roof bar into the metal condensation'drlp gutter designated generally as 20. The metal roof bar channel designated generally at 29 continues downwardly beyond the hollow sheet metal drip gutter, to a suitable point of support to which the flat base 30 of the channel member may be suitably con nected and secured by a bolt or other suitable means to another fiat surface as a web 52, of an angle bracke mounted on the sill 53, as shown in Fig. 2. This is a very desirable feature of construction, in that the framing of the roof bar ends, is obtained in a simple and effective manner, without the employment of special fittings and brackets, and when employed in combination with the sheet metal drip gutter, the water of condensation is readily disposed of.

As shown in 2 and 3, the sill 53 is disposed and seated on a usual side wall 54 of a greenhouse orlike structure. The sill includes a central web portion 55 seated on a portion of the side wall, and is provided with a downwardly extending flange 56 at one end which overlies a portion of the outer face of the side wall; the sill possible 1 ing strip and c r on the also includes an upwardly extending flange 57 at the other end of the web 55 the upwardly -extending web 5'? serving as a shoulder for posiioning the hollow sheet metal combination glazip gutter.

A form of the coinbination glazing strip drip gutter tubular sheet metal mem- .vn in Fig. 3. The combination member diife.=.s from the form shown in Figs. 1 and 2, in that tie depending leg portion 14 is dispensed with, a lip or flange 58 is formed atthe side of the drip gutter, which is adapted'to overlie the upper edge cfthe upwardly extending flange 67 of the sill in order to hold the combination member 11 proper position relative to the sill. The lip 58 may be securedin position between a flange 59 of the bracket or post on the upper surface of the sfll by a bolt connection 60 or led to the width thereof on either side, without r quiring the removal and reconstruction of either of the sides of the greenhouse. For ex le, Fig. 5 shows diagrammatically one sec:

tron a cr house, and Fig. 8 is a view showdi ally, a section such as that represented fter a section has been added to the sic original ection. By embodythis invention, the additional the merely by the conthe roof and one side, and of course, the ends of the added section, and this is made 1 any manner tearing down or cting the side of the original section. gutter, that was originally the end gutter section is now utilized as, a middle gutter between the two sections. The outside middle gutter. of course, carries away the water from one-helf of each roof section. and the mental drip gutter 6 originally installed first section, also serves as a means for receiving and conducting the drip water of condensation'froin the roof bars in one-balf of the added section.

ing the fea positely sloping portions an being of such e 1- tour as to enable the drip water of condensatnn to follow the outer bottom surfaces of the main gutter concentrating ridge'on the bottom there-,

of and from there drop or be discharged intoa supplemental drip gutter supported below.

As shown in Figure 1, the top glazing facia' or member 63 is so arranged and 'disposed'as to leave a space '72 between the upper surfa'c'e'thera.

of, and the'bottom of the gutter 1. In order to properly position the upper frame member 63.

One very desirable feature is,- that the supplemental drip gutter located in the first section can carry away the water of conof the sideof the structure, relative to the gutter, suitable angle brackets 66 may be employed, (analog of the bracket being connected with the upper frame member 63 by a bolt 67 or other suitable means, the other leg 66of :thebracket being secured to the gutter in any suitable manner, such as by bolts or the like as shown in Fig. 7. Figure shows more clearly afragmcn-j tary View illustratingthe space 72 between the bottom of the main gutter 2, and the upper frame member 63 and alsov clearly shows the securing bracket 66, which at certain points, is located between the gutter and the frame member 63.

" The space 72 between the upper frame 63 and the gutter bottom, is closed and 'sealed'from the outer atmosphere, by means of a sealing or closing strip 64 which extends longitudinally of the gutter and the upper frame member 6. The sealing strip is detachably secured in position in any suitable manner by employing preferably a bolt connection between the strip 64 and the side of the gutter, and preferably a screw or nail connection 65 between the'strip 64 and the upper frame member 63. Where an additional section is added at the side, the closing or sealing strip 64 is removed; and if desired the strip may be utilized on the outer side of the added section and thus efiect an economy in construction.

As shown in Figure 1, the inner face of i the closing strip 64 is provided at its top with a shoulder 70 which rests upon the upper edgeof the gutter side, the vertical face 71 of the closing strip preferably being in'contact with the outer face of the gutter side. The inner face of the closing strip is also provided preferably with a recess or cut-away portion 69 in order to accommodate the projecting dispersing ridge 68 formed on'the gutter. i

Figurelis an enlarged section showing the above feature of the invention, applied to a greenhouse having a construction including a main gutter, supplemental drip gutter, and framing for the roof bar ends, similar to that shown and described in United States Patent #1,696,160, dated December 18, 1928, in which I was the in-- ventor; l s

Figure 9 is an enlarged section on the line 99 of Figure S'showing more clearly the relative arrangement of parts adjacent the middle gutter, after the addition has been made at the side of the original section. Inview of the full description given in the patent above referred to, it is not thought necessary to give atthis time a detailed description of the framing and form of the roof bar ends relative to the gutter sides. 'It' will be suflicient at this time to state that the ends of the wooden roof bars '73 are supported by. clasps or brackets '74 which aresecured to the side of the gutter 1. The water of condensation from the drip groove 28 in the roof bars 27 is conveyed tothe side of the gutter, is

dispersed and broken up by the dispersing ridges 68 at the side of the gutter, following the outer surface of the main gutter to'the'bottom concentrating ridge 4 from which point the water is directed to the supplementary drip gutter 6 below themain gutter. It is to be noted that the drip water of condensation from the roof bars in the added'section is conveyed to the side of the guter of the first section, and passes through the space 72 between the top frame member 63 and the'bottom 2 of the gutter and then is discharged into the supplemental drip gutter in these'ction. Sufiicient space, of course, should be left between the top frame member 63 and bottom of the gutter, in order to permit the drip water to freely follow the outer under side of the main gutter, without the liability of the path of the drip water being intercepted by the frame member 63.

Where the detachable sealing strip is employed in combination with a main gutter having a V shaped bottom or the like, a supplementary drip gutter therebelow and with top frame members of the greenhouse side in spaced relation to the gutter bottom, a considerable economy in time and material is effected where it is desired to add an additional section to the width of the original section.

What I therefore claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: Y

1. In greenhouse construction a combined main gutter, drip gutter and glass stop, comprising a main gutter having upstanding sides having a shoulder on the inner side of the upper edge, a hollow sheet metal member within the greenhouse comprising a combined glass stop and drip gutter for receiving water of condensation directly from the glass and also from the roof bars mounted on the upper edge of the gutter side, said glass stop and drip gutter including a depending portion seated on the shoulder of the upper edge of the gutter, the main body of the hollow sheet metal member including a rectangular body portion arranged normal to the depending portion and mounted upon the upper edge of the gutter side, and extending laterally beyond the sides of the gutter, said sheet metal member having'on the top thereof and extending longitudinally thereof, a ridge spaced from the edge and forming a glass stop and one side of a drip or condensation gutter, and a second longitudinally extending ridge spaced from the first ridge and forming the other side of the drip. gutter, and means for conveying the drip water from the drip gutter to the main gutter including drain apertures leading to the interior of the hollow member and a drain aperture in the depending portion to discharge the drip water in the main gutter.

2. In greenhouse construction, the combina-v tion of a main gutter having an upstanding side, and a hollow member within the greenhouse comprising a combination glass stop and supplemental drip gutter, mounted on the upper edge of said main gutter for receiving Water of condensation directly from theglass and also from the roof bars, said combination member including .a tubular portion having on its upper face a plurality of spaced upstanding portions one forming the glass stop and one side of the drip gutter, drain apertures in the bottom of the drip gutter, and other drain apertures in one side of the tubular member for conveying the drip water directly to the main gutter.

3. In greenhouse construction including a combination gutter having an upstanding side, a hollow sheet metal combination member within the greenhouse serving as a drip gutter and glass stop mounted on the upper edge of the gutter for receiving water of condensation directly from the glass and also from the roof bars,' a plurality of ridges spaced on the upper side of the said member, one of said ridges being arranged intermediate to the sides so as to form a glass stop and one side of drip gutter respectively, drain apertures in the drip gutter to carry the water intothe hollow member, and drain apertures in the side of the member to convey the water to the main gutter.

4. In greenhouse construction including in combination a gutter having an upstanding side, a hollow sheet metal combination member within the greenhouse mounted on the upper edge of the gutter side, said member being constructed to serve as a glass stop and a drip gutter for receiving water of condensation directly from the glass and also from the roof bars, said combination member being generally rectangular in form and having on its upper face thereof, a plurality of ridges one of which extends longitudinally of the combination member and is spaced between the sides thereof, and functions as a glass stop on one side of a drip gutter, the other ridge being arranged at the edge of the combination member, drain apertures in the bottom of the drip groove to carry the water of condensation within the hollow member and drain apertures in the side of the hollow member to permit the water of condensation to drain directly into the main gutter, the relative arrangement of theapertures in the bottom of the drip gutter and the aperture in the vertical side of the hollow member being such that a straight implement may be passed therethrough in order to clear the apertures in the event that they become clogged with dirt or the like.

5. In greenhouse construction including in combination a gutter having an upstanding side, having a shouldered portion on the upper edge thereof, a combination drip gutter for receiving water of condensation directly from the glass and alsofrom the roof bars and glass stop comprising a tubular sheet metal member generally rectangular in section within the greenhouse and having a depending hollow portion at the bottom, a drain opening in said depending hollow portion to carry water to the main gutter, a plurality of longitudinally extending ridges on the upper side of said tubular member arranged to form a drip gutter and a glass stop, and a drain aperture in the drip gutter to carry the drip water within the tubular member to the aperture in the depending portion.

6. In greenhouse construction including in combination a gutter having an upstanding side, a wooden roof bar having a drip groove therein, said roof bar also having a seat for receiving glass, a combination drip gutter for receiving water of condensation directly from the glass and also from the roof bars and glass stop comprising a tubular sheet metal member mounted on the upper edge of the gutter, said combination member being generally rectangular in section within the greenhouse and having on the upper face thereof a plurality of ridges one of which is arranged in between the side of the tubular member and serves as a glass stop on one side of the drip gutter, and a second longitudinally extending strip arranged at the outer side of the tubular member and forming the other side of the drip gutter, the end of the wooden roof bars terminating at the drip gutter and having the drip grooves in the roof bar so disposed as toempty the water of condensation directly into the drip groove whereby 'said drip gutter on account of the tubular member receives the water of condensation directly from the glass and from the drip groove in the roof bars, drain apertures in the drip gutter to carry the drip water within thetubular member and other drain apertures in the upstanding sides of the tubular member in order to carry the water of condensation from within the hollow member directly to the main gutter. I

. STEPHEN H. HART.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5513470 *Jun 29, 1993May 7, 1996Cravo Equipment Ltd.Drainage system for retractable roof
US5581954 *Feb 24, 1994Dec 10, 1996Cravo Equipment Ltd.Drainage system for retractable roof
US5809701 *Oct 9, 1996Sep 22, 1998Cravo Equipment Ltd.Drainage system for retractable roof
EP0511717A2 *Jun 5, 1992Nov 4, 1992P.L.J. Bom Beheer B.V.Glasshouse and gutter edge profile therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/14
International ClassificationA01G9/14
Cooperative ClassificationA01G9/1476
European ClassificationA01G9/14G