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Publication numberUS1930929 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1933
Filing dateMay 12, 1931
Priority dateMay 12, 1931
Publication numberUS 1930929 A, US 1930929A, US-A-1930929, US1930929 A, US1930929A
InventorsEisenberg Moses Joel
Original AssigneeEisenberg Moses Joel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hypodermic implement
US 1930929 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1933. M. J. EISENBERG HYPODERMIC IMPLEMENT Filed May 12, 1931 igzZ.

Patented Oct. 17, 1933 UNITED STATES HYPODERMIO IMPLEMENT Moses Joel Eisenberg, Boston, Mass.-

Application May 12, 1931. Serial No. 536,758

4 Claims. (01.128-218) The present invention relates to syringes and is herein disclosed as embodied in a hypodermic needle syringe adapted for medical work.

The hypodermic needle syringe as ordinarily constructed for use in administering local an esthetics and for similar purposes comprises a cylindrical chamber which is fitted at one 'end with a hypodemic needle and is provided with a hand-actuated piston to force the liquid contained therein out through the needle. Drugs suchas novocaine which are utilized for hypodermic injections are commercially put up in small glass ampules hermetically sealed to preserve the strength and purity of the drug. In order to load a syringe from one of these ampules, it is necessary to break off one end of the tube and then to pour or draw the liquid into the cylindrical chamber. This operation is both cumbersome and wasteful.

In carrying out the present invention, a hypodermic needle syringe has been constructed which is provided with a storage magazine connected through a passageway to the vacuum chamber so that liquid may be drawn automatically from one chamber to the other without any danger of contamination by contact with outside sources. In the present embodiment of the invention, a magazine is provided which is particularly adapted to receive the ampules in which drugs utilized for hypodermic injections are commonly put up so that the drug may be drawn into the needle when and in such amounts as it is needed with the least possible inconvenience and waste.

It is to be understood, however, that the invention in its broader aspects is not to be limited to the particular construction of the storage magazine hereinafter described or to the specific method of utilizing the device set forth in connection therewith, but will apply equally well to any suitable type of container and to the use of the device in any useful manner as, for instance, to draw blood or serum through the needle into the magazine where it may be stored without any contact whatever with. outside sources.

The several features of the invention consist in the devices, combinations and arrangement of parts hereinafter described and claimed which, together with the advantages to be obtained thereby, will be readily understood by one skilled in the art from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a hypodermic syringe needle embodying the several features of the invention; and r Fig. 2 is a sectional view of the syringe.

As disclosed in the drawing, the syringe comprises a glass cylinder or tube 4which is supported and protected within a metal frame 6, At' its lower end, the cylinder 4 is provided with aplugS which is bored along its axis to provide. an outlet for the cylinder. and at its outer end has a reduced threaded portion 10 which is screwed into a corresponding recess in a, base block 12. The collar forming the lower end of the frame 6 within which. the glass cylinder 4 is mounted is bent inwardly over a corresponding shoulder 14 on the plug 8 tohold these parts in looking relationship. -The collar formi'ngthe upper end of the frame 6 which surrounds the upper end' of the glass cylinder 4 isthreaded to receive a corresponding nut 16 to hold the glass cylinder securely in place, in its frame. A metal piston or plunger 18 is tightly fitted to slidein the glass cylinder and is provided with a stem 20 which extends upwardly through a corresponding bore in the nut 16. A transversely extending handle 22 is formed on the upper end of the stem 20 and co-operates with a'corresponding cross bar 24 loosely sleeved to turn in a groove 26 in the frame 6 to enable the operator easily by moving one cross bar relatively to the other to operate the piston.

A hypodermic needle 28 is mounted on a hollow bracket or tube 30 which is internally threaded at its base to fit over a. threaded post 32 on the under side of the block '12. A hole 34 is bored through the block to form a passageway from the vacuum cylinder 4 directly to the hypodermic needle.

With the present construction, there is also mounted on the base block 12 a magazine chamber 36 which comprises a cylindrical member internally threaded at its lower end tofit over-a threaded post 38 on the-base block 12. In order to permit an ampule readily to be, placed in the chamber, the. upperend thereof is closed .by means of a screw-threaded-cap 40 with a knurled edge. A hollow stem42 extends upwardly: within the base of the magazine chamber 36 and forms one end of a conduit 44 drilled through the block 12 to interesect the outlet 34 from the cylinder 4 to the hypodermic needle. A washer 48 made. of a soft spongy material; preferably rubber, is fitted around thestem 38 to receive the end of an ampule whichhas been opened by breaking off the hermetically sealed tip and put in the magazine 36, as shown in Fig. 2 of the drawing. A compression spring 50 fitted at one end into a. recess 52 formed on the inner face of the cap 40 bears against the upper end of the ampule to hold it firmly in position against the washer 48.

At the intersection of the conduit 44 leading from the magazine 36 and the outlet 34 extending from the cylinder 4 to the needle is provided a valve which is constructed'to permit a flow of liquid alternatively between the magazine 36 and the cylinder 4 and between the needle and the cylinder 4 through the outlet 34 to the needle. This valve comprises a plug 54 which is fitted into a corresponding recess 56 in the block 12 and is provided with a screwthreaded shoulder 58 adapted for a limited travel between a corresponding shoulder 60 formed on the block and a plate 62 which is secured by screws 64 to cover the open end of the recess. A pin 66 extending perpendicularly through the end of the plug 54 provides a convenientme'ans to the operator to turn the valve to its alternative position. When the valve is turned so that the threaded shoulder 58 is at the outer end of 1 its'travel, a conduit 68 in the plug 54 is positioned to form a. continuous passage from the cylinder 4 to the conduit 44 leading to the magazine 36. When the valve 54 is turned to a position so that the threaded shoulder 58 is at the inner end of its travel, the conduit '70 drilled through the plug will be positioned to form a continuous passage'from the cylinder 4 through the outlet 34 to the needle.

The hypodermic-needle syringe is operated as follows: An ampule containing the drug is opened in the usual manner by cutting off the hermetically sealed tip and is placedin the magazine, the needle at this time being held in an inverted position while the ampule is pushed upwardly into the magazine. The cap 40 is then placed in position with the spring 50 engaging the ampule to seat itagainst the washer 48 and the 'capis then screwed into position. The piston 18 is placed at this time in its depressed position and the valve '54 is screwed outwardly to its limiting position, as shown in Fig. 2, to open the pasageway between the magazine and the vacuum chamber. The piston is now drawn outwardly creating a vacuum in the chamber and in the connecting channels, causing the liquid to be drawn from the ampule into the vacuum chamber. When the syringe hasbeen filled with the desired amount of liq uid, the valve is screwed inwardly to its limiting position to close the passageway to the magazine and to open the passageway between the vacuum chamber and the hypodermic needle. The piston is now forced inwardly to make the injection in the usual manner. If it is desired to hold the syringe in readiness for use, the valve may be-turned to an intermediate position to close both passageways and thus to prevent any escape of the liquid from either the magazine or the vacuum chamber.

It will be seen with the construction and operation of the hypodermic needle syringe herein disclosed as embodying the several features of the present invention that important advantages are obtained overthehypodermic needles ordi narily used for making injections. The ampule is put into a readily accessible magazine so that the vacuum chamber of the syringe can be filled automatically with a minimum of inconvenience in handling the" device. The drug is at all times kept within substantially air-tight containers so that there is no opportunity for outside contacts of the drug with air of foreign objects with possible contamination of the drug. The device may be readily sterilized by boiling or other commonly used means to maintain the metal and glass portions of the syringe which come into contact with the drug free from germs. As compared with the ordinary hypodermic needle, it is possible to secure much more efficient use of the needle, since the ampule chamber may be refilled during the operation of the syringe without hampering its usefulness. 1

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A syringe having, in combination, a chamber, means for drawing in and expelling liquid from the chamber, a hypodermic needle connected by a passageway with the chamber, a magazine comprising a chamber with an outlet forming a passageway to the chamber, a removable cap to permit the insertion of an ampule into the magazine, a spring in the magazine to engage with and seat the ampule over the outlet of themagazine, and valve connections adapted to permit liquid to flow alternatively between the chamber and the needle and between the chamber and the magazine.

2. A syringe having, in combination, a chamber, means for drawingin and expelling liquid from the chamber, a hypodermic .needleconnected by ,a passageway with the chamber, a magazine having an outlet -forming a passageway to the chamber, a removable cap to permit the insertion of an ampule into the magazine, a compression spring mounted in the cap adapted to, engage with and seat the ampule ,over the outlet of the magazine, and valve connections adapted to permit liquid to flow alternatively between the chamber and the needle and between the chamber and the magazine.

3. A syringe having, in combination, a cham- .ber, means for drawing in and expelling liquid from the chamber, a hypodermic needle connected by a passageway with the chamber, a magazine, an outletforming a passageway: to the chamber and comprising a hollow stem extending within the magazine, a collar comprising a spongy substance surrounding the stem to receive the open end of an ampule, spring means within the magazine for seating the ampule on the collar, and valve connections adapted to permit liquid to flow alternatively between the chamber and the needle and betweenthe cham her and the magazine.

4. A syringe having, in. combination, a chamber, means for drawing'in and expelling liquid from the chamber, a hypodermic needle connected by a passageway with the chamber, a closed magazine having an outlet forming a passageway to the chamber, means of access to the magazine to permit the insertion and removal of an ampule, means for seating the open end of the ampule over the outlet to the magazine comprising a collar .formed of a spongy substance connected to, said outlet to receive the open end of the ampule, and means supported by the magazine to maintain the ampule in engage ment with said collar, and valve connections adapted to permit liquid to' flow alternatively between the chamber and the needle and between the chamber and the magazine.

MOSES JOEL EISENBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2744648 *Mar 9, 1953May 8, 1956George H ScherrClosure
US2821193 *Jul 22, 1952Jan 28, 1958Geoffrey W WalkerMultiple injection inoculator instrument
US3220777 *Sep 20, 1962Nov 30, 1965Allis Chalmers Mfg CoHead control for particle counter
US3572556 *Mar 25, 1969Mar 30, 1971Peter PogacarApparatus for metering of liquids
US3874380 *May 28, 1974Apr 1, 1975Smithkline CorpDual nozzle intranasal delivery device
US3874381 *May 28, 1974Apr 1, 1975Smithkline CorpDual nozzle intranasal delivery device
US4364376 *Dec 26, 1979Dec 21, 1982Bigham Keith EMethod and device for injecting a bolus of material into a body
US4941883 *Apr 25, 1988Jul 17, 1990Aldo VenturiniDisposable safety syringe
US5658248 *Aug 4, 1995Aug 19, 1997Localmed, Inc.Double-blind infusion device and method
US5720732 *Apr 12, 1993Feb 24, 1998Whisson; Maxwell EdmundParenteral device
US6270481Jun 16, 1999Aug 7, 2001Breg, Inc.Patient-controlled medication delivery system
US6719728Aug 7, 2001Apr 13, 2004Breg, Inc.Patient-controlled medication delivery system with overmedication prevention
US8556854Jul 20, 2011Oct 15, 2013Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDual chamber syringe with retractable needle
US8556855Jul 20, 2011Oct 15, 2013Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDual chamber syringe with retractable needle
US20100168679 *Dec 29, 2009Jul 1, 2010Kimberly QuinnUltra Low Dose Delivery System of Injectables For Animal Health Care
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/183
International ClassificationA61M5/31
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/31, A61M5/204
European ClassificationA61M5/31