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Publication numberUS1931579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1933
Filing dateFeb 13, 1931
Priority dateFeb 13, 1931
Publication numberUS 1931579 A, US 1931579A, US-A-1931579, US1931579 A, US1931579A
InventorsWilliam L Gilchrist, William T Hoofnagle
Original AssigneeRowe Slug Ejector Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple coin separator
US 1931579 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 24, 1933. w. l.. en cHRls-r Er AL MULTIPLE COIN SEPARATOR Filed Feb. `1:5

4 Sheets-Sheet INVENToRs. W.L. G/LCHR/ST W 7'. HF/VHGLE a E: 9 u f 6 ATToR EY.

Oct. 24, 1933.. w. L. GxLcHRlsT x-:r AL

MULTIPLE COIN SEPARAT'OR Filed Feb. 15.1951 4 sheets-sheet 2 INVENTORS. W. L. G/LCHRIST W- T. HOOFNHGLE I ATTRNEY.

Oct. 24, 1933.

4W. L. GILCHRIST El' AL MULTIPLE COIN SEPARATOR 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb..\l3. 1931 INVENTORS.

A TTORNEY.

I 06h24,' 1933- w. l.. GlLcHRls'r l-:r AL 1,931,579

MULTIPLE COIN SEPARATOR Filed Feb. 13. 1931 A Sheets-Sheet 4 I 16a 163 A I I lINVENTORJ.

[54 WL. GLCHRST.

7.' HFNIQGLE A TTORNEY.

Patented Oct. 24,L1933 UNITED STATES PATENT. oFFicn:

l 1,931,579 MULTIPLE com sEPARA'roR William L. Gilchrist, 4Los Angeles, Calif., and

William T. Hoofnagle, Glen Ridge, N. J., assignors to Rowe Slug Ejector Co., Ltd., Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of Nevada A Application February 13, 1931. Serial No. 515,464

4 Claims.` (Cl. 194-101) 150 pro- Other objects and advantages of this invention l5 will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a side view of our improved coin selecting device.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged section taken on line 2?-2 of Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a section taken on line 3 3 of Fig. f2.

Fig. 4 is a section taken on line 4-4-oi Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged section taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged section taken on line 6 6 of Fig. 3.

Fig. f1 is a section taken on line 7-7 of Fig. 6. Fig. 8 is a section similar to Fig. 5 showing a modified form of coin chute.

Fig. 9 is a similar section showing a further modified form of coin chute.

Fig. 10 is also a view similar to Fig. 5 showing a still further modified form of coin hute.

Fig. 11 is an enlarged .fragmentary section through the housing showing a modied form oi magnet arrangement. v

Fig. 12 is a view similar to Fig. 1l showing a further modication of the magnet arrangement. Fig. 13 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig.

3 showing a modified arrangement of the opposed magnets.

Fig. 14 is a section taken on line 14-14 of Fig.

Fig. 15 is an end view of a modiiication of our invention. Fig. 16 is a Asection taken on line 16-1'6 of Fig. 15. Y

Fig. 1'? is a section taken on line 17-17 of Fig.

Fig. 18 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the side of the housing shown in Fig. 16 showing the magnet in detail, and

Vm"liig-.Miilis a'section taken on line 19--19 o! Fig. 17.

Referring to the drawings by reference characters we have indicated our improved coin se lecting device generally at 10. This device is.; adapted to be used in combination with token or vcoin controlled machines, change making devices or can'be used independently for testing coins or for other purposes.

As shown the device 10 comprises a housing 12 which .is made of brass or similar material and includes side members 13 and 14. The side mem- 65 ber 13 is provided with a front flange `15, a back Aflange '16, a bottom ange 17 and a top flange 18.

TheI side member 14 is shown as secured to the side member 13 by aplurality of screws 19.`

Within the housinglZ we provide guide rails 20 and 21 which form the bottom of a coin chute -22 and as shown the rails 20 and 21 are secured to the side member 13 by screws Y2l. A member 23 which is secured to the side member 13 by screws 24 includes a guide portion 25 which forms VVone side of acoin chute 26, a guide portion 27 which forms the bottom? rail of a coin chute 28, a

guide. portion 29 which forms one side of va coin chute 30 and a guide portion 31 which forms the top of the lower portion of the coin chute 30. 30 The other side of the coin chute 30 is formed by a guide rail 32 which is secured to the side member 13 by screws 33 and which includes an arcuate upper guide portion 34 and an angular bottom 85 guide portion 35.

An anvil member 36 which is loosely'mounted on screws 3'? securedto the yside member 14, includes a vertical portion 38 which forms one side of a coin chute 39 the opposite side of whichvis formed by the ange 15 of the side member 13. 90 The anvil member 36 further includes an inclined i'ace 40 which forms'a portion of the bottom oi a coin chute'41 and a portion 42 which extends above the inclined face 40 to form a separating point. Adjacent the loose anvil member 36 we 95 provide an anvil 43 which is rigidly secured to the l side member 14 by screws 44 and which includes an angular face 45 which forms 'a portion oi' the bottom of the coin chute 41.

Spaced from the anvil member 43 we provide a guide rail 46 which is secured tothe side member 14 by screws 47. The rail li6 includes an arcuate portion 48 which forns a portion of the bottom of the coin chute 41; a portion 49 which forms one side of a coin chute 5g and a portion 5 1-which forms the bottom'of the 'coin chute 50. 'Ihe end of the arcuate portion 48 adjacent the anvil 43 extends above the upper surface of the arcuate porticato. form a coin separating point 52 and 110 the ilange 16 of the sidemember 13.

Spaced below the guide rail 46 we provide a guide rail 53 whichis secured Ato the side member .ics

,14 by a plurality of screws 54 and which forms the bottom of a coin chute 55A The inner end of the guide rail 53 is spaced from the flange 15 of the side member 13 and includes an upwardly extending portion which forms a coin separating point 56.-

Spaced from the inner end of the guide rail 53 We provide an anvil member 57 which is rigidly secured to the side member 14 by screws 58 and which forms the bottom of the coin` chute 39.

In the coin chute 22 we, provide a magnetic member which is shown in the form of a horseshoe magnet 60 which is positioned in a similarly shaped aperture inj the side member 13 and is secured to the side member 13 by a cross bar 61, a bolt 62 and a nut 63 (see Figs. 1, 3 and 4). The poles of the magnet 60 form portions of the bottom of the coin chute 22 and are flush with the upper surface of the guide rails 20 and 21.

At the portion 35 of the coin chute 30 we provide a pair of 'opposed `inagnet members 65 which are shown as of the horseshoe type; As shown the pole ends of the magnets are positioned in apertures 66 provided in the side members 13 and 14 and are ush with the inner, faces of the side members. As shown the magnets are mounted on lips 6'7 turned out from the side members and clamped to the lips by bars 68 and 69 and screws 'IOL The magnetic members 65 may each be one solid piece as shown or they may be each made lup of a plurality of separate magnetic members.

The members 20 and 21 of the coin chute 22 are inclined downward from the front fiange 15 and are adapted to direct tokens onto the portion 2'7 of the coin chute 28.

In the coin chute 26 we 'provide an aperture '72 in the side member 13. The topof the aperture '72 is positioned below the upper surface of the guide rails 20 and 21 and below the upper surface of the portions 2'7 of the member 23. On the side of the aperture '72 adjacent the magnet 60 an inturned ange '13 is provided. The aperture 'I2 opens into a coin chute '75 which is formed by an upper guide rail '76 whichv is 'secured to the side member 13 by countersunk screws '7'7 and a lower guide rail '78 which is secured to the'side member 13 by countersunk screws '79 (see Fig. 4). The coin chute '7 5 includes an inclined portion 80 which is adapted to direct tokens towards a coin chute-81. Arranged at an angle to both the coin chute and the coin chute 81 we provide a coin chute 82.

The coin chute 82 is formed by an upper guide 4rail 83 which is secured to the side member 13 by a plurality of countersunk screws 84 and by a lowerguide rail 85 which is secured to the side member 13 by countersunk screws 86. Thecoin chute 82 includes a curved portion 8'7 which is adapted to direct tokens into a coin chute 88. One side of the coin chutes '75, 80, 81 and 82is formed by the side member 13 and the other side of these coin chutes is formed by a plate which isv secured to the guide rails by screws 91 and which include side anges 92, 93, and 94, of which the flange 92 forms one side of the coin chute 81.

In the side member 13 and in the coin chute 39 we provide an aperture 95 which'opens into thecoin chute 81. The upper edge of the aperture 95 is spaced below the coin separating point 42 of the anvil 36 and below the upper edge of the guide rail 85. j

`In the side member 13 and in chute .portion Li1 between the anvil 43 and the guide rail 46 we provide an aperture 96 which opens into the coin chute 88. The upper edge ofthe aperture 96 is below the upper surface of the anvil 43, below the coin separating point 52 and below the upper portion of the guide rail 85.

Between the anvil 5'1 and the guide rail 53 an aperture 9'7 is provided in the side member '13 which opens into the coin chute 88. The upper edge of the aperture 9'7 is positioned below the upper surface of the anvil 5'7 and below the coin separating point 56 of the guide rail 53.

Coins or tokens are adapted to pass from within .the housing 12 through the aperture '72 into the coin chute '75 and from within the housing through the apertures 96 and 9'7 into the coin chute 88 while coins or tokens are adapted to pass from the coin chute 81 through the aperture 95 into the housing 12.

i In Figs. 6 and '7 we have shown one means for directing the coins or tokens through the apertures '72, 95, 96, and 9'7. In these gures the means for directing coins or tokens through the aperture 96 is illustrated but the same means is used in connection with all the apertures men flanges 99 which are bent inwardly from the side members in which the aperture is positioned.

In the portion 80 of the coin chute '75 we prolill@ vide a magnet member 100 which is shown as oi the horseshoe type. This magnet is positioned in an aperture in the plate 90 and is secured thereto by a cross bar 101 and a screw 102. The pole ends of the magnet 100 are flush with the working surface of the guide rail '78 and the lower side 103 of the magnet is flush with the guide rail 83 of the coin chute 82. The lower corner of the pole of the magnet is rounded into the lower side 103 as indicated at 104.

Coins or tokens are shown as adapted to be delivered to' the coin chute 22 by a coin chute 105 and spurious coins or tokens are adapted to be directed from the coin chute 88 away from the device 10 through a coin chute 106. Certain good coins are adapted to be directed from the coin chute 4l into a coin chute 107, others from the coin chute 50 into a coin chute 108 and still others from the coin chute 55 into a coin chute 109,. 'I'he coin chutes 10'7, 108 and 109 may direct the coins to coin actuated mechanisms such as when' the device 10 is used in a vending machine or lill@ merely to separate compartments such aswhen the device is used in a change making machine.

As stated the device 10 is adapted to separate good coins or tokens from spurious coins or tokens and to separate good coins vor tokens of dilerent denominations. As shown the device 10 is adapted to separate spurious coins or tokens from United States twenty five cent, ten cent and five cent pieces, and Canadian five cent pieces.

In operation all coins are delivered through the coin chute 105 to the coin chute 22 which directs them towards the coin chute 28. Spurious coins or tokens which contain ferrous material will, when they pass over the magnet 60, be subjected to the influence of the magnet so that their speed will be reduced and they will follow around the side of the magnet into the coin chute 26 and as they pass downward they contact with the flange 'I3 and become disengaged from the magnet 60' whereupon they pass through the aperture 72 into the coin chute 75. The strength of the magnet 60 is insuflicient to cause tokens containing ferrous material to adhere thereto in deiiance of gravity. As Canadian nickels contain-a ferrous material they will be directed through the aperture 72iinto the coin chute 75 along with ferrous slugs.

All non-ferrous coins or tokens will not be slowed down by the magnet 60-and will jump the 'gap formed by the coin chute 26 onto the portion 27 in the coin chute 28. 'IIhe portion 27 of the coin chute 25 is inclined upward fromthe coin chute 26 towards the entrance tothe coin chute 30 to slow the coins down so that they will not strike the guide rail 32 with syfiicient force to cause them to rebound and roll back into the coin chute 26. From the coin chute 28 the coins or tokens pass down the coin chute730 `tothe inclined portion 35. A good twenty five cent piece upon leaving the coin chute 30 will strike the anvil 45, rebound and jump thegap between the anvil 45 arating-point 52 and roll along the portion 48 and the guide rail 46 and pass' overthe coin septhereof which directs it into the coinchute 107.

As the coin chute'50 is substantially equal in width to the. diameter of la ten cent piece, the

twenty-five cent piece will pass thereover into the coin chute 107. A good ten centpiece upon leaving the coin chute 3Q will follow the same course as Qthe twenty-five cent piece until it reaches the coin chute 50 whereupon it will fall down the coin chute 50 and will be directed into the coin chute rail 53 and pass over the coin separating point 56 into the coin chute 5'5 whereupon it will roll alon'g\ the guide-rail 53 and into the coin achute 109.

As some spurious twenty-five cent and ten cent pieces pass the magnets 65 the eddy currents set upby the coins rolling through the flux field will effect the v locity thereof in a manner whereby gravity wil direct them downward between the i anvil and the separating point 52 whereupon they will pass through the aperture 96 into the coin chutev 88. .Still other spurious twenty-five and ten cent pieces will'be affected by the eddy currents as they pass through the ilux iield ofthe magnets which will effect the velocity thereof in a manner whereby the force of gravity will direct them to strike theloose anvil 36. As thej anvil 3 6 is loosely supported. the momentum of the spurious coins will be damped upon striking the anvil 36`and will pass over the face 45 of the anvil 43 and pass through the aperture 96 into the coin chute A88. l

From the foregoing'descripticn it will be apparent .that all good United States twenty-ilve and ten cent pieces will be directed to strike the .anvil 43', rebound and pass over the coin separating point 52 and pass along the portionY 48 of the guide rail 46 from which the twenty-five cent piecespass into the coin chute 107 vand the ten cent pieces into the chute 5 0 and thence to the coin chute 108. And that all good U. S. ve cent pieces are directed to pass over the coin seperating point 42 and pass down the coin chute 39, strike the anvil 57 and rebound and pass over the coin separating point 56 and pass along the guide rail 53 to the coin chute 109.

The spurious coins and tokens which contain ferrous material and Canadian nickels upon en. tering the coin chute 75 roll therealong and passy 80 the magnet 100 in the portion 80. The magnet 100 is of a strength which will attract the ferrous l material ofa Canadian iive cent piece with such little force that the force of gravity readily overcomes the magnetic force at the same time the magnetic strength of the magnet 100 is such that the force of gravity does not so readily overcomev the magnetic force on spurious coins containing more ferrous material than a Canadian nickel.

Thus when a Canadian nickel passes the magnet.100 the force of gravity causes it to fall into the coin chute 81 and thence through the apeture into the coin chute 39 and thereafter it follows the same course as the U. S. nickel.

As the more ferrous spurious coins pass over 95 the poles of the magnet the force of gravity carries them downward but the magnetic force causes them to adhere to the side- 103 of the magnet and they roll therealong until they engage the guide rail 83 of the coin chute 82 whereupon 100 they pass along the coin chute 82 and thence into the coin chute 88.

As shown, half of the magnet 100 is positioned on the inside of the plate 90 and half on the outside thereof. Across the poles of the magnet 105 100 onthe outside of the plate.90 we provide a keeper whichis shown as secured to a lip 112 on the crossbar 101 by a screw 113. The screw 113 is positioned in an elongated aperture 114 in the lip 112 so that the keeper may be moved to 1,10 various positions on the poles to adjust the magnetic force of the magnet on the ferroustokens.

When the coins pass the magnets`65 it is desirable that they have the same relation threto at all times and as the coin chute 30 is of a thick- 115 ness sufficient to vallow a twenty-ve cent piece to pass therethrough there is more than enough room for a ten cent piece which mightnever pass the magnets in approximately the same position. To cause the ten cent pieces to all pass the magnets 65in approximately the same position we bevel the portion 35 of the guide rail 32 as indlcated at 116 and clearly shown in Fig. 5. By

^so beveling the portion 35 all of the ten cent pieces are directed towards one ofthe magnets 65 and thus they all pass the magnets 65 in approximately the same position.

In Fig. 8 we have shown the portion 35 of the guide rail 32 as provided with a V shaped groove 117 `which will cause `the ten cent pieces to vbe inclined towards one magnet or the other as indicated by the dotted lines. Thus as the ten centpieces pass the magnets they all have approxl mately the same relation thereto.

In Fig. 9 we have shown the portion 35 of the guide rail 32 as provided with a straight sided groove 118 with the edges thereof beveled as indicated at 119. As the ten cent pieces pass4 the magnets 65 in this instance they are positioned in the. groove 118 and are retained in a vertical position midway between the opposed magnets 65 thus' all ten cent pieces pass the magnets in the same relation thereto.

In Fig. 10 we have shown the portion 35 of the guide rail`32 provided with an'elliptically shaped groove 120 and with shoulders 121. Oneach side thereof. VAs a ten cent piece passes the'magnets 65 in the groove 120 it is tilted towardsone magnet or the other similar to the ten cent pieces as vTwenty ve cent pieces and five cent pieces do not enter the groove but pass thereover on the shoulders 121.

Instead of using the pair of opposed magnets 65 we may use a single magnet 125 which is po'- sitioned on one side of the coin chute with a keeper 126 opposite therefrom as shown in Fig. 11.

Coins or tokens rolling between the magnet and the keeper 126 will set up eddy currents in the ux eld which will affect the coin or token in a manner similar to that described in connecflux field extends across the coin chute from the' poles of the magnets to the associated ends of the keeper in a manner similar to that when the opposed magnets 65 are used.

lin Figs. 13and 14 we have shown a modification of the arrangement of the opposed magnets wherein a pair of horseshoe magnets 131 are arranged in the portion 35 of the coin chute 30 at right angles to the position of the magnets 65.

` As shown the pole ends of each of the magnets 131 are positioned in longitudinal alignment with the coin chute with one pole adjacent the top of the coin chute and the other adjacent the bottom of the coin chute. The action of the coins or tokens as they pass through the flux iield of the magnets 131 is the same as previously described in connection with the magnets 65.

In Figs. 15 to 19 inclusive wehave indicated generally at 135 a modification of `our device wherein a portion of the device 10 is used as a single unit for separating Canadian nickels from U. S. nickels and spurious coins.

As shown the device 135 comprises a housing 136 which includes a side member 137 and a side member 138. The side member 137 includes upper and lower inturned anges 139 and 140 land inturned side iianges 141 and 142 and the side member 138 is secured to the side member 137 by a plurality of screws 143.

Within the housing 136 we provide an ncl/ined coin chute 145 which includes a guide rail 146, secured to the side member 137 by a plurality of screws 147 and a guide rail 148 which is secured to the side member 135 by a. plurality of screws 149. f i i At an angle to and communicating with the coin chute 145 we provide another coin chute 150,

a portion 151 of which is approximately, at right angles to the coin chute 145, and a portion 152 The c oin,

of which is approximately vertical. chute includes a guide rail 153 which is secured to the side member 137 by a plurality of vscrews 1,54 and a guide rail 155 which is secured to the `side member 137 by a plurality of screws 156. l

Adjacent the side of the housing 136 opposite the coin chute`150 weprovide a. coin chute 158 which is approximately vertical and at its yupper end communicates with the coin chute 145 and at its lower end communicates with a coin chute One side of the coin chute 158 is formed opposite side is formed by the flange 142 of thel side member 137. The upper end of the guide rail 160 is preferably beveled to correspond to the angle of the coin chute 145 and to form a coin separating point 162.

The coin chute 159 includes a bottom guide rail 163 whichu is secured to the side member 138 by a plurality of screws 164 and is inclined from the horizontal and includes a curved upper face portion 165 which rounds into the coin chute 158.

Positioned between the coin chute 150 and the coin chute 158 we provide an aperture 166 in the side member 137. One side of the aperture 166 is in line with the juncture of the upper side of the coin chute with the coin chute 145 and the top of the aperture is below the angular portion 151 of the coin chute 150.

The upper portion of the guide rail 155 of the coin chute 150 terminates in line with the adjacent side of the aperture 166 and includes a coin separating point 167.

The aperture 166 opens into a coin chute 168 which is formed by a housing 169. To direct coins or tokens through the aperture 166 we provide a tongue 170 which is stamped out of the side member 138 and bent across the space between the side members 137 and 138 with the lower end thereof positioned in the aperture 166 (see Figs. 17 and 19). On the side of the aperture 166 opposite the guide rail 160 we provide a flange 171 which is formed from the material of the side member 137 and is bent inwardly towards the side member 138.

At the juncture of the upper portion ofy the coin chute 150 with the coin chute 145 we provide a magnetic member 172 which is shown as of the horseshoe type. The magnet 172 is positioned in a similarly shaped aperture in the side memvmember 137 by a cross bar 175 and a screw 176,

Across the pole ends of the magnet 172 on the outside of the side member 137 we provide aA keeper 177 which is shown as secured to a lip 178 on the cross bar 175 by a screw 179. The screw, 179 is positioned in an elongated aperture 180 in' the lip 178 so that the keeper may be moved to various positions on the poles to adjust the magnetic force of the magnet on ferrous coins or tokens.

For delivering coins or tokens to the coin Achute 145 we provide a coin chute 182 and for conveying coins or tokens away from the housing 136 we provide afcoin chute 183. f

A's Shown the device 135 is adapted to separate spurious coins or tokens and U. S. nickels from Canadian nickels.

In operation the coins or tokens are delivered through the coin chute 182 to the coin chute 145 which directs them downward past the magnet 172. All non-ferrous coins as they roll down the coinchute 145 gain sufficient velocity to jump the gap between the magnet 172v and the coin separating point 162 and pass over the coin separating point 162 into the coin chute 158. 4'i'hus nonferrous slugs and U. S. nickels enter the coin the gap in said fourth coin chute and chute 158 and pass to the coin chute 159 and thence into the coin chute 183. As coins or tokens containing ferrous material pass the magnet 172 the magnetic force thereof acts against the action of gravity and slows them down an amount dependent upon the quantity of ferrous material contained therein. The magnetic strength of the magnet 172 is so adjusted that when Canadian five cent pieces pass the lower pole of the magnet the force of gravity thereon will overcome the magnetic attraction and the Canadian five cent piece will fall vertically and pass between the coin separating points- 162 and 167 and pass through the aperture 166 into the coin chute 168.

Coins or tokens containing more ferrous material will, as they pass the lower pole of the magnet 172, continue to be attracted to the magnet with such force that the force of gravity does not entirely overcome the magnetic force but causes the coins or tokens to roll downward along the side 173 of the magnet. When the coins or' tokens engage the guide rail 153 the force of gravity thereon overcomes the magnetic forceA and the coins fall into the vertical portion 152 of the coin chute 150 and thence into the coin chute 159 which directs them into the coin chute 183.

Throughout the specification and claims we have usedthe word ferrous as'typical of all para-magnetic coins or tokens and the word non-ferrous as typical of all dia-magnetic coins or tokens.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that we have provided a novel coin selector which is simple in construction andv highly efficient in use.

Having thus described our invention, we claim: 1. In a coin separator, a housing, a coin chute in said housing, said coin chute being inclined, means to deliver coins to said coin chute, a second coin chute in said housing spaced from said first coin chute to form a gap therebetween, said second coin chute being positioned below said first `coin chute and being inclined opposite to said first coin chute, a magnetic member yassociated with said rst coin chute and positioned adjacent said gap, said magnet being adapted to cause ferrous coins to fall through said gap between said rst and second coin chutes, non-ferrous coins being adapted to jump said gap frm said 'first coin chute to said second coin chuteQ'a third coin chute, said third coin chute communicating with said second coin chute and being inclined 'at a sharper angle than said'second coin chute,

a pair of opposed magnetic members associated with said third Acoi chute, said magnets being of the horseshoe type with their poles associated with the side walls of said third coin chutes, a fourth coin chute in said housing positioned below said third coin chute, a gap in said fourth coin chute, there being an aperture Ain said housing.

adjacent said gap, a rigid anvil adjacentone side of said gap in said fourth coin chute, a guide rail in said Ifourth coin chute having a coin separating point adjacent said gap, a loosely mounted anvil adjacent said rigid anvil, said opposed magnets being adapted to affect certain good'coins in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause said good coins to strike said rigid anvil ,and'rebound and jump said gap in said fourth coin chute, said opposed magnets being ladapted to affectcertain spurious coins in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause them to enter pass through said aperture, other spurious coins being affected by said opposed,v magnets'iri a manner whereby the force of gravity causes them to strike the loose anvil thereby damping the momentumy thereof so that said other spurious coins cannot jump said gap in said fourth chute.

2. In a' coin separator, a housing, a coin chute in said housing, said coin chute being inclined, means to deliver coins to said coin chute, a second coin chute in said housing spaced from said first coin chute to form a gap therebetween,.,said second coin chute being positioned below said first c'oin chute and being inclined opposite to said .\rst coin chute, a magnetic member associated with said first coin chute and positioned adjacent said gap, said member being adapted to'cause ferrous coins to fall through said gap between said first and second coin chutes non-ferrous coins being adapted to jump said gap from said rst coin chute to said second coin chute, a third coin.y chute, said third coin chute communicating with said second coin chute and being inclined at' a sharper angle than said second coin chute, a pair of opposed magnets associated with said third coin chute, a fourth coin chute in said housing positioned below said third coin chute, a gap in said fourth coin chute, and an aperture in said housing adjacent said gap,`a rigid anvil adjacent one side of said gapin said fourth coin chute, a guide rail in said fourth coin chute having a coin separating point adjacent said gap, a loosely mounted anvil adjacent said rigid anvil, said loose anvil having a coin separating point thereon, a fifth coin chute adjacent said loose anvil,

` said opposed magnets being adapted to affect certain good coins in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause said goodcoins to strike said rigid anvil and lrebound and jump said gap in said fourth coin chute, other good coins being affected by said opposed magnets in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause said other good coins to pass over said coinrseparating point on said loose anvil and enter said fifth coin chute, said opposed magnets being adapted to affect certain spurious coins in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause them to enter the gap in said fourth coin chute and passl through said 120 aperture, other spurious coins being affected by said opposed'inagnets in a manner wherebythe force of /gravity causes them to strike the loose .anvilthereby damping the momentum thereof so that said other spurious coins cannot jump said gap in said fourth coin chute, a sixth coin chute in said housing arranged at an angle to said fifth coin chute, an anvil in Asaid fifth coin chute, a guide rail in said .sixth coin chute spaced from said anvil in said fifth coin chute to form a gap therebetween, there being an aperture in said housing adjacent said gap in said sixth coin chute, good coins in said fifth coin chute being adapted to .strike said anvil and jump said gap and ass over said coin chute, `spurious coins in said fth 135 coin chute being adapted to strike said anvil in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause them to pass through said gap in said sixth coin chute and pass through said associated aperture.

l 3.l In acoin separator, a housing, a coin'chute in said housing,l said coin chute being inclined,

means to deliver coins to said coin chute, a second coin chute in said housing spaced from said first coin chute to form a gap therebetween, said second coin chute being positioned below said 145 first coin chute and being inclined opposite to said rst coin chute, a` magnetic member assoi ciated with said first coin chute and positioned adjacent saidgap, said magnetic member being said gap between said first and second coin chutes, non-ferrous coins being adapted to jump said gap from said flrst coin chute to said second coin chute, a third coin chute, said` third coin chute communicating with said second coin chute and being inclined at a sharper angle than said second coin chute, a pair of opposed magnetic members associated with said third coin chute, said magnets being of the horseshoe type with their poles forming a portion ofthe side walls of said coin chute, a fourth coin chute in said housing positioned below said third coin chute, a gap in said fourth coin chute, and an aperture in said housing adjacent said gap, a rigid anvil adjacent one side of said gap'in said `fourth coin chute, a guide rail in said fourth magnets in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause said other good coins to pass over said coin separating point on said loose anvil and enter said fifth coin chute, said opposed magnets being vadapted to affect certain spurious coins in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause them to enter the gap in said fourth coin chute and pass through said aperture, other spurious coins being affected by said opposed magnets in a manner whereby the force of gravity causesthem to strike the loose anvil thereby damping the momentum thereof so that said other spurious coins cannot jump said gap in said fourth coin chute.

e. In a coin separator, a housing, a coin chute in said housing, said coin chute being inclined, means to deliver coins to said coin chute, a second coin chute in said housing spaced from said first coin chute toform a gap therebetween, said second coin chute being positioned below said first coin chute, a magnetic member associated.4

the pole associated with the side lwall of said third coin chute, a fourth coin chute in said housing positioned below said third coin chute, a gap in said fourth coin chute, there' being an aperture in said housing adjacent said gap, an anvil adjacent one side of said gap in said fourth coin chute, a guide rail in said fourth coin chute having a coin separating point adjacent said gap, a second anvil adjacent said first anvil, said horseshoe magnet being adapted to affect certain good coins in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause said good coins to strike said first anvil and rebound and jump said gap in said fourth coin chute, said horseshoe magnet being adapted to affect certain spurious coins in a manner whereby the force of gravity will cause them to enter the gap in said fourth coin chute and pass through said aperture, otherspurious coins being affected by said opposed magnets in a manner whereby the force of gravity causes them to strike the second anvil thereby damping the momentum thereof so that .said other spurious coins cannot jump said gap in saidl fcurth chute.

\ WILLIAM L. GILCHRIST.

WILLIAM T. HOOFNAGLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2436701 *Jun 20, 1946Feb 24, 1948Sundholm Edwin PGrease-gun head construction
US2528690 *Apr 26, 1947Nov 7, 1950Nat Slug Rejectors IncParamagnetic coin separator
US3059748 *Feb 10, 1959Oct 23, 1962Zygmut S KrysiakMultiple coin separator
US3452849 *Aug 29, 1967Jul 1, 1969Wilson M StewartMagnetic coin tester
US3556276 *Mar 29, 1968Jan 19, 1971Vendo CoDual path coin sorting and validating device
US4465173 *Jun 9, 1981Aug 14, 1984Fuji Electric Co., Ltd.Coin selector
US6966417 *Feb 10, 2003Nov 22, 2005Cummins-Allison Corp.Coin chute
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/326, 453/3, 194/344
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/08, G07D3/00, G07D5/00
European ClassificationG07D3/00, G07D5/08, G07D5/00