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Publication numberUS1931750 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1933
Filing dateFeb 13, 1931
Priority dateFeb 13, 1931
Publication numberUS 1931750 A, US 1931750A, US-A-1931750, US1931750 A, US1931750A
InventorsBlaski Aloyzius R
Original AssigneeFrank Hussey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Skylight construction
US 1931750 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 24, .1933. A. R. BLAsKl SKYLIGHT CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. l5, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet l Oct. 24, A1933.

A. R. BLAsKl .SKYLIGHT CONSTRUCTION 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 13, 1931 Patented Oct. Z4, 1933 -Uireo sTATEs SKYLIGHT CONSTRUCTION Aloysius E. Blaski, Chicago, Ill., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Frank Hussey, Chicago, Ill.

' Application February 13,

20 Claims.

My invention relates to skylight construction' and has for its object the provision of a new and improved form and'arrangement of parts whereby the construction of either a stationary skylight or amovable Ventilating skylight may be CII facilitated, whereby there shall be increased exibility in the matter of making the factoryprepared parts fit `different conditions on the job, and whereby there shall be the maximum of strength in proportion to the weight of material employed.-

To these ends, it is one of the objects of my invention to provide improved means for connecting together the bars making up the frames which support the glass of the skylight, and particularly to provide an improved arrangement by 'which the side and intermediate bars which extend in inclined position between the top and bottom rails of the frame are capable of being secured very firmly in position in any desired location longitudinally of the rails with a minimum of work on the job for supporting pieces of glass of different widths.V Y

It is another object of my invention to provide improved frame bars in the formy of extruded structural shapes of aluminum alloy so shaped as to provide the desired bearings for the parts and as to have the requisite strength with respect to the stresses applied thereto in ordinary use.

It is another object of my invention to provide an improved form of hinging means for the sections employed in a Ventilating skylight structure such that the sections may be easily operated and whereby they shall be held firmly against displacement by the wind when in either a fully closed position or in a fully opened position It is another object of my invention to provide an improved arrangement of bearing surfaces for the glass and putty whereby a more secure joint may be procured between the glass and the frame.

It is another object of my invention to provide improvements in devices of this type in sundry details hereinafter pointed out. The preferred means by which I have accomplished my several Objects are illustrated in the drawings and are hereinafter specifically described. That which I believe to be new and desire to cover by Letters Eatent is set forth inthe claims.

In the drawings,-

Fig. 1 is a vertical section through a Ventilating skylight embodying my improvements, the closure section at one side being shown in open position land being broken away for clearness of illustration;

Fig. 2 is a cross section through one of the 1931. Serial No. 515,513

(Cl. 10S- 16) intermediate cross bars which extend between the top and bottom rails of the structure of Fig.

1, and showing the pieces of glass in position thereon;

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross section through my 60 improved bottom rail as shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a vertical cross section through the top rail of said Fig. 1;

Fig. `5 is a View similar to Fig. 2, but showin the arrangement at the end of the skylight rather than at an intermediate point;

Fig. 6 is a vertical section taken at of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but showing a modified form of structure as applied to a stationary skylight;

Fig. 8 is a perspective View, partly in section, showing a short length of the form of ridge pole structure as used in Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a perspective view, partly in section, 75 showing the form of the upper end portion of the cross bar by which it is enabled to have notched engagement with the ridge pole structure as shown in Fig. '7.

Fig'. 10 is a sectional view taken atthe end of 80 the skylight section as shown in Fig. '7, being taken as looking obliquely upwardly toward the ridge pole; Y n

Fig. 1l is a vert'cal section through the curb and associated parts at the end of the skylight immediately below the end cross bar as shown in Fig. 10; f L

Fig'. 12 is a cross sectional View through a modi.- ed formof intermediate cross bar;

Fig. 13 is a cross sectional View through another 90v modified form of cross bar, and showing the pieces of glass mounted in position thereon; and l Fig. 14 is a View showing a modified form of connection between the cross bars and the ridge pole structure, and showing the enclosure glass in position. y

Referring now to Figs. 1 to 4, in whichcorresponding parts are indicated by the same. reference characters, 20 indicates a side plate: com- Y prising a portion of the curb of my improved skylight construction. 2l indicates an angle bar eX- tending from the plate 20 at one side of a skylight opening to a similar plate at the opposite side not shown. An upright bar 22 rising from the middle portion of the horizontal bar 21 is 105 vconnected at its upper end with rafters 23. The gable end, in the construction shown, is closed by a piece of sheet metal 2 4 (see Figs. 5 and 6).

At the upper end of the upright bar 22 atvthe end of the skylight, a heavy cast plate 25 is se- 110 rline 6 6 v cured in position upon the upper edge of the sheet 24, one of such plates being provided at each end of the structure for supporting sheet metal ridge pole members 26 and 27, as is best shown .in Fig. 1. The vertically spaced members 26 and 27 may, of course, be connected at intervals by bracing and spacing means if desired.

The bottom rail of my improved closure section is best shown in Fig. 3, in the forni of an extruded structural shape of aluminum alloy, comprising a web portion 28 having an upwardly extending flange 29 near the upper edge of the web, the outer edge portion S0 of saidv flange being turned downwardly parallel with the web 28. At its lower edge portion, the .veb23 is provided with a return bend portion 3l substanw tially opposite the downwardly turned edge portion 30, the upper edge of the 'return bend portion 3l being provided with an oblique flange portion 32. A horizontally disposed flange 33 is provided at the lofwerinos't return bend portion, and a down'- waiidly extending' flange" 34 is provided at tliis saine-point. Y

The top rail of my improvedstructure'is .W wise in the form of an extruded structural Snape of aluminum alloy'co'mpr'ising' a web S5 having a etur'nbend pfirtionl 36 at its lower edge,- at the upper edge ofwhich is provided ar iiangc 37 vet-A tending obliquely downwardly. The" 'web 85 1s oi'fset slightly Yat an intermediate point, the upper edge portion 38g thereof is in posi-- tio-1i with respect `to theposition of the fnain p tion of the web. Flanges 39 and 40 are-pra vided in spaced relation to each other on the inner face of the top rail, the flange 4Q being provided at its outer edge with a downwardly turned e portion 41 located opposite the return bend portion 36. As is clearly-shown in Figs. 3 and 4, the upper faces of the flanges 29 and 40 are p1 vided with longitudinally extending ribs be" made possible by reason 'of the production of the rail'sb'y an extrusion operation.

'The cross bar as 'shown in Fig. 2, and the cap device also shown in said figure are also in the form of Aextruded structural shapes 'of aluminum* alloy; The cross bar comprises a web 42 pro# 'I inafteijset forth. The cap as shown in Fig. 2

vded with laterally disposed flanges 43 at opposite faces thereof near its upper edge, and provided with troughesh'aped `laterally disposed flanges 44 at its lower edge of said width to extend outwardly beyond the edges of the flanges 4.3'. The upper edge portion of the web 42 is 'made considerably heavier for the purpose of providing bearings for securing screws as heren 1s in the formof a channel with outwardly entendNk ing flanges at opposite sides, the cap as a whole being indicated by the numeral 45. The bottom 'faces of the anges of the cap 45 and the top faces ofthe ilang'es 43 of the 'c'ross'bar 'are pro-` vided with longitudinally extending ribs, and the bottom faces of the flanges 44 are longitudinallycorrug'ated.

Inthe arrangement shown in Fig. 1,' the top and bottom rails are arranged in spaced rela tion to each other with a length of cross bar extending therebetween, the cross bar being provided at each end with a bracket 46 secured in position by` means of a bolt 4'7. Each of the brackets 46 comprises a portion 43 of greater Ascope than the lug portions by which the brackets are secured in position, the arrange# ment being such that the brackets are adapted to have a dove-tailed connl'ecti'o'nY with the top and bottom rails, the downwardly directed flanges irre- `flange 52 thereon a short distance above the lower edge uof the bar.

flange 5l is provided with longitudinally extendrails by means of machine screws such as the screws 53 as shown in Fig. l which extend through openings in the top and bottom rails and are tapped intosorew threaded openings in the brackets. The arrangement is such that the flange 29 rof the bottom rail stands directly opposite to theilange 51 of the end rail at its lower end, and such ilange 51 at its upper end stands directly opposite to the flange 4D of the upper rail. With the in such arrangement', a piece of glass 54 (see Fig. 5) is placed in position upon the flanges 5l, 29 and 40, imbedded in 'putty thereon so as to nll the space adjacent to the end barbeti'zveen the top and bottom railsI An intermediate cross 'bar is next secured 'slidably in position in the top and bottom rails by means of brackets 46 .so asto be'moved longitudinally of The upper face of the` `ing ribs and the bottom face of the flange 52 is f tillv 'lilfl the top and bottom rails into the desired posi tion for receiving the edge of the glass above the fiange 43 at that side of ythe bar, a suitable supply of putty being provided upon such ange for providing tliedesired tight joint. A second piece of glass 55 is then placed in position in a proper bed of putty upon the flanges 43, 29 and 40, and a second intermediate cross bar `is secured in position at the opposite edge of such piece of L" glass 55. When the closure section has reached the ldesired length, after the insertion of the required number of pieces of glass and intermediat'e cross bars, the opposite end of the closure section is arranged in substantially the same way j .l

as is above described in connection with the construction as shown in Fig. 5.

By the provision of the slidably mounted inat each point between two adjacent pieces of glass, as is best shown irrFig. 2.

The arrangement is preferably such that the bottom bar of the closure section rests directly upon the curb plate 2O or upon the flashingat 'this point if aflasning is used. in the construction shown in Fig. 1, a flashing .57 is employed at the face of the curb. 1

In the arrangement shown in Fig. 1, the closure section is hingedly mounted iny position by means of an upwardly turned flange 58 at the edge of the ridge member 27, the lowermost portion of the top rail being bent at a fairly sharp angle for providing in effect a knife support for the rail in the angle between the flange 58 and the main portion of the plate 27,. In the arrangement shown, the angular upper edge portion 38 of the top rail is brought into close relationship with the top ridge pole plate 26, the lower edge of such ridge pole plate 26 being turned downwardly and inwardly forproviding a `flange 59 adapted normally to stand in close proximity to the flange 39 of the top rail.

- By the provision of the trough shaped flanges 44 at opposite `sidesof the intermediate rails, I am enabled to take care of any water which might possibly nd its way through the joint between the pieces of glass, such water being adapted to flow down the troughs provided by the flanges 44 and to empty into the gutter provided by the return bend portion 31 of the bottom bar, such moisture being adapted to escape onto the roof through an opening 31a in suitable position through the web 28. Any water of condensation which may gather upon the lower faces of the flanges 44 is caused to flow down the grooves of the corrugations so as to empty into the gutter provided by the return bend portion 31, the flange 32 being adapted to insure this result, being disposed obliquely downwardly to'- ward the bottom rail while being at the same time in divergent position upwardly with respect to the bottom faces' of the cross bars.

. Referring now to Figs. 7 to 12 inclusive, in which corresponding parts are indicated bythe same reference characters, 60 indicates the side bars of a curb connected at their ends by transverse curb bars 61. In the arrangement shown in Fig. 7, it is not necessary to use an arrangement of rafters as isl shown in connection with Fig. l, since the stationary closure sections are themselves adapted to support the load. In the arrangement shown in Fig. 7, a bottom rail 62 is employed of substantially the same arrangement as that above described, except that a flange 63 is employed extending obliquely downwardly and inwardly in lieu of the horizontally disposed flange 33 of the bottom rail rstdescribed, and except that a downwardly extending flange 64 is employed differing slightly from the vertical flange 34. The flange 64 is secured permanently in position by means of bolts 65 passing through the flange and through an angle bar. 66 flxedly mounted upon the curb bar 60. The arrangement as shown in Fig. 7 does not require the use of a top rail such as is shown in connection with the constructionl of Fig. 1. In lieu of such top rail, a ridgepole construction 67 is employed for holding 'the cross bars in position. In the arrangement shown, the ridge pole is in the form of an extruded structural shape of aluminum alloy comprising'a vertically disposed web 63 and obliquely disposed spaced flanges 69 and 76 at each side of the web. The upper faces of the flanges 76 are provided with longitudinally extending ribs corresponding to theribbed arrangement of the bars as shown in Fig. 1.

The cross bars employed in the arrangement as shown in Fig. 7 for the-stationary skylight structure are in the form of extruded structural forms of aluminum alloy originally formedvery much nlike the intermediate cross bars as shown in Fig.'2, except that they are providedjwith laterally extending flanges 71 at theupper edges of the vertically disposed web 72,such flanges 71 being in spaced relation to the flanges :73 which correspond with the flanges 43 of the first described cross bar. For the joint betweenr the upper ends of the cross bars and the ridge pole structure, the flanges of the ridge pole construction Vare notched at their side edges at 74 for receiving a 4key portion 75 of the web 72, as is clearly shown in Fig. 9,v the web 72 also being notched at 76 for receiving a portion of the` web 70. For permitting this arrangement, the end portions of the flangesk 73 are cut loose from the web 72 and are bent downwardly so as to stand in contact with the lower faces of the flanges 70, as is clearly shown in Fig. 7. By this arrangement, the cross bars are connected With the ridge pole construction so as to be held against movement vertically with respect tothe ridge pole structure and so as to be held against movement longitudinally of such ridge pole construction. The upper faces of the flanges 73 are provided with longitudinally extending ribs, and

the bottom faces of the trough forming flanges v 77-are corrugated.

As is clearly shown in Fig. 9, the web 72 orf the cross bar is extended slightly beyond the upper ends ofthe trough flanges 77 so as to provide a fastening lug 78, such lug portion being offset laterally to a slight extent to provide for the connection of two oppositely disposed cross bars to each other by a bolt 79 as is clearlyshown in Fig. 7. The lower ends of the cross bars are provided with brackets 46 by which sliding en-` gagement is effected with the bottom rail in the manner above described in connection with the construction of Fig. 1.

The end cross bar as shown in Fig. 10 is of the same arrangement as that shown in Fig. 2, comprising a vertically disposed web 80 having bearingflanges 81 near is upper edge and through lflanges 82 extending laterally at its lower edge,

corresponding with the flanges 43 and 44 of the earlier described structure. As is clearly shown in Fig. 10, the sheet metall closure member 83 which closes the gable end is turned outwardly and downwardly at its upper end providing a flange 84 which hasl snug engagement with a sheath flashing 85 which is Vsecured in position upon the cross bar by means of a plurality of screws 86, the inner edge of the flashing bearing upon the top face of a piece of glass 87 imbedded in putty upon the bearing flange 81. As will be readily understood, the piece of glass 87, and' the other pieces of glass at opposite sides of the intermediate cross rails have their lower` ends imbedded in putty upon the flange 29 of the bottom rail, and their upper ends imbedded in putty between the flanges 69 and 70 of the ridge pole structure. An intermediate piece of glass 88- is shown 'in Fig. 7.

As is clearly shown in Fig. 11, in the construc-v t by brackets 92 above the sill member 60 underf neath the obliquely disposedflange 63 in position to receive the water from the gutter provided/by the bottom rail, openings '93 Vbeing provided i or the escape of the water into such trough.

In'Fig. 12, I have shown a vertical cross section of the intermediate cross rail employed in the construction of Figo?.

Y Inasmuch as the arrangement and operation of the construction as shown in Figs. 7 to l2 is very similar to that already described in connection` with Figs. l to 6, it is believed to ybe unnecessary to describe the vsame further herein.

In Fig. 13, vI have shown a modied form of cross rail for use in connection with the structure of either Fig. 1 or Fig. 7. This modiiied orm of rail comprises Va vertically disposed web portion 94 which is thickened at its upper edge portion to receive a machine screw 95, bearing flanges 96 being provided at the top edge of the web portion rather than at a point slightly below such top edge as is shown in Figs.` 2 and l2. Trough flanges 97 are provided corresponding to the flanges 44 and "I7 of the formerly described structures. A cap 45 is held in position by the screws 95 above ythe edges of pieces ofglass 98 and`99 which are imbedded in putty as above described.

The construction shown `in Fig. 14 is slightly diferent from that shown in Fig. '7. The original form of the cross bar as shown in Fig. le is the same as that shown in Figs. 'l to 12. The final form of the bar is different, however, in that bolts 100 are employed for securing the cross bars to the ridge pole construction in lieu of the arrangement as shown in Figs. 8 and 9 comprising the notches 74 and 76. The arrangement shown in Fig. 14 also diiers from that formerly described in that two bolts 79a are employed in lieu of the single bolt '29. In Fig. 14 the two pieces of glass shown mounted upon the cross bars are indicated by numerals 101.

In both constructions shown, the several top and bottom rails, and the crossbars, as well as certain of the other parts are in the form of extruded structural shapes of aluminum alloy, made ready for use with a minimum of hand worli thereon. Each of these forms is more or less complicated, but by reason of my improved ar-` rangement I am able to produce such parts in extruded metal which is adapted to withstand successfully all ordinary weather and climate conditions without any noticeable deterioration from year to'year, and to withstand severe acid atmospheric conditions such as would in a very short time destroy unprotected iron or steel structures. I have found that these forms canbe produced successfully upon a commercial basis in an aluminum alloy oi .such characteristics as to Yenable the metal to resist successfully seashore atmospheric conditions without any appreciable oxida-I tion. By the useof myvconstruction by which the cross bars 42 can readily be' secured in any desired adjusted position along the top and bot-- torn rails, my constructionis capable of very quick and Aeasy installation. The required length of top and bottom rails can be sent to a job, together with the required number of cross bars, and such frame structure parts can be readily applied to their final operative form regardless of the width of the pieces of glass which may be available for the job. If desired, different widths of glass can be used to advantage upon a single job, it being only necessary to provide openingsfor thescrews 53 at the' desired points i'or holding the cross bars in position. As a matter of fact, it would not even be necessary to employ screws "3 in connection with intermediate cross bars, it being sufficient if desired that merely the cross bars atthe ends of a section be secured to the top and bottom rails, although I prefer to secure each of the cross bars in rigid position by the use of such bolts 53. l

While I prefer to employ the construction 'as shown in my drawings, it will be understood that my invention is not limited thereto except sorfar as the claims may be so limited by the prior art, it being understood that changes might well be made in the form of the' construction without departing from the spirit of my invention.

l. A skylight comprising in combination a longitudinally extending bottom rail, a longitudinally extending top rail 'in 'spaced relation to said bottom rail, crossbars connected for sliding ad# justrnent with said top and bottom rails, and pieces of glass supported by said rails and bars and serving to space said orossbars in operative position with respect to each other.

2. A skylight comprising in combination a longitudinally extending bottom rail, a longitudinally extending top rail in spaced relation to said bottom rai-, crossbars having dovetailed head and groove connections with said top and bottom rails adjust-ably movable to any desired positions along said rails, and pieces of glass supported by said here and serving to space said crossbars at the de ed distance apart.

3. A s ylight comprising in combintion a longitud'nally extending bottom railya longitudinally extending top rail in spaced relation to said bottom rail, said'top rail having a longitudinal dove'- tail groove along its inner face opening towards saidbottom rail, crossbars, means connecting said crossbars with said top and bottom rails and comn ing pieces of glass liing the spaces between said crossbarsirom said top'rail to thebottom rail.

V4. A skylight'ccncprising in combination a longitudinally. extendi g bottom rail, a longitudinal ly extending top rail in spaced relation to said bottom rail, said bottom rail having a dovetail groove therealong on its'inner .face opening towards Vsaid top rail7 a plurality of crossbars in inclined position between said top and bottom rail-sisecured in position on said bottom rail in anyV desired adjusted position` therealong .by headsV having dovetailed connection with said groove, and pieces oi glass vinterposed between said crossbars serving to space said crossbars from each other.

5. A skylight coin incom'oinatien a longitudinally. extending bottom rail, a longitudinally extending top rail in spaced relation to said bottom rail, said top and bottom rails having longitudinal dovetail grooves in their inside faces, crossbars, connecting plates extending,Y from the ends of said crossoars with.

enlarged head portions engaging said dovetail groo es for connecting said Vcrossbars with the top and bottom rails'7 pieces oi glass supported by said rails ane 'crossbars and controlling the spacing between said crossbars.

6. A. skylight. comprising in combination a longitudinally extending bottom rail, a longitudinally extending top rail in spacedrelation to said bottomrail, top bottom rails having longitudinal dovetail grooves their inside faces, cross bars, connecting plates extending from the ends of said cross bars .vith enlarged portions engaging said dovetail grooves for connecting cross with the top and bottom rails, said cross `bars having flanges extending laterally therefrom at points below the upperV edges oi the icc ng heads in said groove., and means eompris l bars and one of said rails having a groove on the inner face opening toward the other rail, and pieces of glass extending into said groove between said cross bars and resting on said flanges. n

7. A skylight comprising in combination top and bottom rails in the form of extruded. structural shapes of aluminum alloy and each having oppositely disposed web portions directed toward each other forming a dovetail groove therealong, cross bars having head portions at opposite ends `adapted to be slid longitudinally of the rails into position to be held by said groove-forming web portions, and pieces of glass filling the spaces between the several bars and supported by said bars. l

8. A skylight comprising in combination a top rail in the form of an extruded structural shape of aluminum alloy having oppositely disposed web portions directed toward each other forming a dovetail groove therealong, a bottom rail, cross bars having head portions adapted to beslid longitudinally of the top rail into position to be held by said groove-forming web portions, said top rail being provided with a flange portion in spaced relation above the upper one of said groove-forming web portions serving to provide a second groove in said rail open toward the bottom rail, and pieces of glass extending into said second groove in said top rail and filling the spaces between the several cross bars,

9. In a skylight, the combination of top and bottom rails in the forni oi extruded structural shapes of aluminum alloy comprising web portions forming the bodies of the rails, and each having bearing portions at opposite edges thereof located opposite the body portion in spaced relation to the body and in spaced relation to each other, cross bars having at opposite ends head portions of greater span than the distance between said bearing portions and adapted to be slid longitudinally or" the rails into position to be held by said spaced parts, and pieces of glass filling the spaces between the several cross bars.

l0. In a skylight, the combination of a bottom rail in the form of an extruded structural shape of aluminum alloy comprising a web portion forming the body of the rail, having a flange at its upper edge located opposite the body portion in spaced relation thereto and having a return bend portion at its lower edge in spaced relation to the body portion and in spaced relation to said ange portion, cross bars having head portions of greater span than the distance v between said flange and said return bend portion adapted to be slid longitudinally of the bottom rail into position to be held by said iiange and return bend portion in snug engagement with the body portion, and pieces of glass nlling the spaces etween the several cross bars, said return bend portion serving with the body of the rail to form a trough for gathering and carrying away the water of condensation from thel structure through openings at the lower edge of the rail.

11. In a skylight, the combination of a bottom rail in the form of an extruded structural shape of aluminum alloy comprising a web portion forming the body Iof the rail, having a iiange at its upper edge located opposite the body portion in spaced relation thereto and having a return bend portion at its lower edge in spaced relation to the body portion and in spaced relation to said flange portion, cross bars having head portions of greater span than the distance between said ange and said return bend portion adapted to be slid longitudinally of the bottom rail into positionto be held by said flange and returnbend portion insnug engagement with the body portion, pieces of glass filling the spaces between the several crossbars, said return bend portion serving withthe body of the rail to form avtrough for gathering and carrying away the water of condensation from the structure through openings at the lower edge of the rail, and a web portion carried by the bottom rail extending obliquely upwardly from the top edge of said return bend portion in divergent relation to the bottom faces of said cross bars for directing water from the cross bars to said trough.

12. In a skylight, the combination of a longitudinally extending bottom rail, a plurality of cross bars extending obliquely upwardly and inwardly from said bottom rail and connected thereto and each in the form of an extruded structural shape of aluminum alloy comprising a vertically disposed web portion forming the body of the cross bar, flanges extending in both directions from said web portion near its upper edge providing supporting bearings, other flanges providing condensation gutters at opposite sides of the bar below said rst named flanges, said last named 'lianges being provided with longitudinally extending grooves on their bottom faces, pieces of glass supported by said bearings and serving to close the spaces between said cross bars, and trough means below the lower ends of said cross bars in position to receive the water of condensation from said grooves at the lower ends of the cross bars.

13. In a skylight, the combination of a longitudinally extending bottom rail comprising a turned back flange portion providing a trough along its bottom edge, a gutter supported inside and below said bottom rail, a flange extending inwardly and downwardly from the lowermost return bend portion of said trough arrangement and overhanging said gutter, cross bars connected at their lower ends with said bottom rail, and pieces of glass filling the spaces between said cross bars. y

14. In a skylight, the combination of two longitudinallyextending bottom rails at opposite sides of the skylight opening, a ridge pole structure in elevated position between said bottom rails, cross bars comprising vertical disposed webs, means for directly connecting the upper ends of the webs of said cross bars together, means for connecting the lower ends of the said cross bars to the bottom rails, said webs being provided with transversely disposed flanges at their upper edges and being attached at such iianges to the ridge pole structure. Y

15. In a skylight, the combination of two longitudinally extending bottom rails at opposite sides of the skylight opening, a ridge pole structure comprising two vertically spaced fianges on either side of a central web, cross bars comprising vertically disposed webs, means for directly connecting the upper ends of the webs of said cross bars together and for connecting the lower ends of the cross bars to the ybottom rails, the vertically disposed-web of each cross bar being provided with laterally extending anges near the upper edge thereof, the web of each cross bar and one of the flanges of said ridge pole structure having notched engagement with each other.

16. In a skylight, the combination of a gable supporting structure, a plate extending along the peak thereof with a marginal portion sloping downwardly at either side of saidl peak, and provided with an upwardly extending flange at each longitudinal edge forming a condensation gutter, and movable window frames, each including an upper rail extending` into said gutter at the base of the respective flanges to form a hinged connection for the respective frames.

i7.' In a skylight, the combination of a longitudinal plate supported in elevated position and provided with a sloping marginal portion flanged at its lower edge to form a gutter, and a movable window frame including an upper rail extending into said gutter at the base of said flange to form a hinged connection for the frame.

18. In a skylight, the combination of alongitudinal plate supported in elevated position and provided with a sloping marginal portion flanged at its lower edge to form a gutter, and a movable window frame including an upper rail extending into said gutter at the base of said flange to form a hinged connection for the frame, said frame including a plurality of .rafters with the upper rail provided with a groove on its lower `face for connection with said rafters.

19. In a skylight, thel combinatio-nof a plate u supported in elevated position with a sloping mar- 'Meo ginal portion, and a flange at the lower edge of said portion, a ridge member supported above said plate and provided with an inwardly bent flange on its under side and a movable window framef'includin'g an upper rail` extending at its lower edge into the juncture of said plate and flange thereof to form ahinged connection, said upper rail being provided also with av pair of spaced anges at its upper edge adapted to receive there between the ange on the ridge member when the frame is in closed positionrto form a seal between the frame 'and the ridge member.

20. In a skylight, the combination'of a longi' tudinally extending bottomv rail, a plurality of cross bars extending obliquely upwardly and in-v said cross bars in position' to receive the water or condensation from said grooves at the lower ends of the cross bars.

- ALOYZIUS R. BLASKI.

102', nog

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/72, 52/209, 52/409, 52/846, 52/461, 52/94, 52/395, 52/92.2, 52/460
International ClassificationE04D3/02, E04D3/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04D2003/0881, E04D2003/0831, E04D2003/0806, E04D3/08, E04D2003/0875
European ClassificationE04D3/08