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Publication numberUS1932516 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1933
Filing dateJun 9, 1932
Priority dateJun 9, 1932
Publication numberUS 1932516 A, US 1932516A, US-A-1932516, US1932516 A, US1932516A
InventorsGilleland Edgar B
Original AssigneeNewton Cross
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hand device for making hooked rugs
US 1932516 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1933- E. B. GILLELAND HAND DEVICE FOR MAKING HOOKED RUGS Filed June 9, 1932 Patented Oct. 31, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT, OFFICE 1,932,516 HAND DEVICE FOR MAKING HOOKED BUGS Application June 9, 1932.

Serial No. 616,177

6 Claims. (01. 112-80) My invention relates to a hand device for making hooked rugs.

Hooked rugs are usually made by hand using a small, hollow awl with which a series of bights are formed in a piece of taut burlap on which is traced a pattern. A plurality of different colored yarns are used to fill in the pattern. The bights are then cut off and the result is a piled fabric having a design therein made of colored yarns.

The awl which is used to form the bights is usually of considerable diameter in order to clamp or hold the preceding loop or bight in place while a new one is being formed. Considerable care must be taken to keep the yarn with which the bight is being formed loose in order to prevent the preceding bight from being pulled out. Frequently the loops or bights are of irregular length, and the distance between adjoining bights 20 of a hooked rug, made by hand with the ordinary instrument, will vary. The hooked rug which results is somewhat loose and after a time it will be found that the bights which form the rug will become loose and the rug will become threadbare in places. Obviously, this procedure requires a considerable amount of time and it is tedious work.

One object of my invention is to provide a small hand device for making hooked rugs in which the length of the bights formed thereby are of uniform length.

Another object of my invention is to provide a hand device for making hooked rugs in which the distance beiween the bights formed thereby is uniform.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a hand device for making hooked rugs which is adjustable to vary the length of the bights.

A further object of my invention is to provide a hand device for making hooked rugs in which the disfance between the bights formed thereby is adjustable.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a device in which the awl penetrates the fabric only a sufficient amount to clamp the preceding stitch.

Other objecfs of my invention will appear from the following description.

In the accompanying drawing which forms part of the instant specification and is to be read in conjunction therewith and in which like reference numerals in the various views are used to indicate like parts:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of a device embodying one mode of carrying out my invention.

Fig. 2 is a side view, with part of the handle and the yarn holding cage broken away, of the device shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view of part of the device shown in Fig. 1, showing the needle actuating mechanism and the stitch advancing action.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary diagrammatic View showing the needle in position clamping the preceding bight down at the instant just before the bight is formed.

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view showing the bight forming step.

Fig. 6 shows a series of bights just prior to cutting.

In general, my invention contemplates a bight forming mechanism in which the needle penetrates the burlap or fabric upon which the hooked rug is being made a given distance, clamping the preceding bight and followed by the formation of the bight by means of a follower member which moves to a greater extent than the needle.

Referring now to the drawing, a frame 1 is provided with a handle 2 of any suitable shape, and carries a yarn holding cage 3, in which ball of yarn 4 is disposed. A gear 5 is carried by the frame member 1 for actuation by handle 6 and crank arm '7. Meshing with gear 5 is gear 8, which is keyed to shaft 9 and adapted to rotate it. To shaft 9 is secured a disk 10 adapted to be rotated thereby. Upon disk 10 is mounted a crank 11 upon which is pivotally mounted, connecting rod 12 by means of strap 33. It will be appreciated that as disk 10 rotates crank 11 will reciprocate connecting rod 12 according to the eccentricity of the crank. To connecting rod 12 is secured in any suitable manner hollow needle 13, which will hereinafter be referred to as awl 13. A guide member 14 provides a bearing for the reciprocating motion of the awl 13. Guide member 14 is adjustably mounted in slot 15 formed in the frame 1. It will be appreciated that as guide member 14 is adjusted vertically in the slot 15, the pivot for the motion traverse to the axis of the frame 1 will be adjusted. As the guide member 14 is moved toward the bottom of the slot 15, the amplitude of the traverse motion will be decreased. This traverse motion is the stitch advancing motion and determines the distance between successive bights. To increase the length of a stitch, the guide member 14 is moved toward the upper portion of the slot 15 and the distance between the full line position and the dotted line position of the awl in Fig. 3 will be increased. The crank 11 has rigidly secured to the end thereof a lever 16 which will move in a circular path with. the disk 10 due to the fact that it is rigidly secured to the shaft 11. slidably mounted upon the connecting rod 12 by means of a head 17 is a follower member 18. This follower member will be hereinafter referred to as a follower. The follower is secured rigidly to head if. Head 17 has a U-shaped cross section and is held upon connecting rod 12 by means of rivets l9, screws, or in any other suitable manner.

Pivoted to head 17 by means of screw 20, or in any suitable manner, is a connecting link 21 which is pivoted to lever 16 by means of pin 22 which is secured to link 21 in any suitable manner. Lever 16 is provided with a series of ad lusting holes 23 for the reception of pin 22, it being understood that link 21 is made of material which is resilient enough to permit its flexing for the removal of pin 22 from a given adjusting opening 23.

It will be appreciated that when pin 22 is seated in the outermost hole 23 of the link 16, the amplitude of the reciprocation imparted to the follower is at a maximum, and when the pin 22 is seated in the hole 23 nearest the point of connection of the lever 16 to the crank 11, that the reciprocation of the follower will be at its minimum.

From the above construction it will be apparent that as the operating crank I is turned to turn gears 5 and 6, the disk 10 will revolve, reciprocating the connecting rod 12 and the awl 13. At the same time, the lever 16 will revolve in a circular path to reciprocate the head 1? and the follower 18 upon the connecting rod 12. The follower is mounted to reciprocate through the hollow awl 13. The position of the respec tive pivot points 22 and 11 is such to give the desired timing, that is, when the awl and the follower member are fully retracted the awl is moving from the dotted line position to the full line position in Fig. 3. The follower does not begin its downward motion until the awi has pierced completely through the fabric, and does not engage the yarn for the loop forming operation until the preceding bight has been locked. The awl will remain substantially in stitch looking position until the follower member has completed its downward motion which forms the bight, following which the awl will lead the follower member in the upward motion. The motion of the awl will lead the reciprocating motion of the follower member, inasmuch as the direction of rotation is that shown by the arrow in Fig. 3.

As can be seen by reference to Fig. 1 there is an angle of approximately 90 between the crank operating the awl and the crank operating the follower. As can also be readily seen by reference to Fig. 1 the amplitude of reciprocation of the follower is considerably greater than that of the awl. The full line position of the awl shown in Fig. 3 is the position of the awl after it has entered the fabric and is about to complete its downward motion. As the crank 11 moves through 180 the awl will move from the full line position to the dotted line position advancing the device in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 3, through an amplitude determined by the setting of the guide it in the manner explained above.

In operation, a ball of yarn is inserted in the yarn carrier 3, and is threaded through fair-lead 25 which may be of any suitable design and threaded through hollow awl 13. The device is placed upon the work with the loose end of the yarn trailing toward the rear end of the device, that is, in a direction to the right of the fair lead in the position shown in Fig. 1. As the crank is turned to revolve the disk 10 in the direction of the arrow. in Fig. 3, the awl will move downwardly pushing apart the yarns of the burlap and clamping the looseend of the yarn between one side of the awl and a portion of the yarn of the burlap. This is shown clearly in Fig. 4, in which the yarn 26 which is being used to form the rug is shown clamped between the face 27 of the awl and one yarn 28 of the burlap upon which the rug is being made. It will also be appreciated that due to the fact that the awl 13 is made of considerable size the distortion resulting from its penetration of the burlap will push yarn 28 of the burlap against yarn 29, so that a prior bight 30 will be clamped by the yarns 28 and 29.

As the crank 7 continues to rotate, disk 10 carrying crank'll and lever 16 will continue to rotate moving follower 18 by means of link 21 and head 17 downwardly. The result of this motion is shown in Fig. 5. The follower 18, the end of which is rounded and formed with a little fillet 31, engages the yarn 26 and pushes it downwardly to form the bight. Inasmuch as the yarn is clamped by the awl face 27 and the burlap yarn 28, the bight will be formed by feeding from the ball of yarn 4 down through awl 13. After the bight has been formed, a continued rotation of the disk 10 will move the needle out of the burlap followed by the follower, thus forming thebight in place. This action is repeated and it will be readily appreciated that a series of bights or loops will be formed in the burlap in succession. The ends of the bights or loops cut, forming a series of bights which are held in. place .by the burlap and extending to one side as shown in Fig. 6.

It will be appreciated that l have accomplished the objects of my invention. I am enabled to make hooked rugs rapidly and to have the stitches or bights of equal length and of equal spacing, forming a closely woven hooked rug in which the piles may be as deep as desired. I am enabled to adjust the distance between bights in event that a looser woven rug is desired. The awl does not penetrate the fabric upon which the rug is being woven any more than is necessary, which. enables my device to be operated with a minimum expenditure of energy and with great rapidity without the danger of breaking the yarn of the burlap. The clamping action efiected by my needle prevents the preceding stitch from. being pulled out while a new one is being formed.

It will be understood that certain features and sub-combinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and sub-combinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of my claims. It is further obvious that various changes may be made in details within the scope of my claims without departing from the spirit of my invention. It is, therefore, to be understood that my invention is not to be limited to the specific details shown and described.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A device for making hooked rugs including between the short crank and said awl whereby rotation of the crank is adapted to impart a combined vertical and lateral reciprocating movement to said awl, means for adjusting said guide member to vary the amplitude of the lateral component of said reciprocating movement, a follower extending through said awl and slidably positioned on said connecting rod, and means for adjustably connecting said follower to said long crank for reciprocation thereby through a predetermined amplitude.

2. A device for making hooked rugs including in combination a frame, apair of rotatable cranks extending at a predetermined angle to each other mounted on said frame, a guide member, a hollow awl slidably positioned in said guide member, a connecting rod extending between one of said cranks and said awl whereby rotation of the crank is adapted to impart a combined vertical and lateral reciprocating movement to said awl, means for adjusting said guide member to vary the amplitude of the lateral reciprocation, a follower extending through said awl and slidably positioned on said connecting rod, and a link for joining said follower to the other of said cranks for reciprocation thereby.

3. A device for making hooked rugs including in combination a frame, a short crank and a long crank extending at a predetermined angle to each other mounted for rotation on said frame, a hollow awl, a connecting rod extending between said awl and said short crank, a follower extending through said awl and slidably positioned on said connecting rod, and means for adjustably connecting said follower to said long crank for reciprocation thereby through a predetermined amplitude.

4. A device for making hooked rugs including in combination a frame, a pair of cranks extending at a predetermined angle to each other mounted for rotation on said frame, a hollow awl, a connecting rod joining said awl and one of said cranks for reciprocation thereby, a follower extending through said awl and slidably positioned on said connecting rod and a link for joining said follower to the other of said cranks for reciprocation thereby.

5. A device for making hooked rugs including in combination a frame, a pair of rotatable cranks extending at a predetermined angle to each other mounted on said frame, a slot in said frame, a guide member adjustably mounted in said slot, a hollow awl slidably positioned in said guide member, a connecting rod joining said awl and one of said cranks for reciprocation thereby, a follower extending through said awl and slidably positioned on said connecting rod and a link for joining said follower to the other of said cranks for reciprocation thereby.

6. A device for making hooked rugs including in combination a frame, a pair of cranks extending at a predetermined angle to each other mounted for rotation on said frame, a hollow awl connected to one of said cranks for reciprocation thereby, a follower extending through said awl connected to the other of said cranks and adapted to be reciprocated thereby.

EDGAR B. GILLELAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3132612 *Jan 7, 1960May 12, 1964Cabin Crafts IncMachine for producing cut and uncut pile fabrics
US3356047 *Aug 2, 1965Dec 5, 1967Callaway Mills CoTufting needle and method of making same
US4006694 *Jun 12, 1975Feb 8, 1977Rumplestiltskin's Craft Shop, Inc.Hand held tufting machine
US4475473 *Sep 16, 1982Oct 9, 1984Constantin SamoilovHand-held embroidery machine
US5555826 *Jul 5, 1995Sep 17, 1996Spencer Wright Industries, Inc.Shifting needle carpet mender
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/80.5
International ClassificationD05C15/00, D05C15/06
Cooperative ClassificationD05C15/06
European ClassificationD05C15/06