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Publication numberUS1935656 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1933
Filing dateOct 23, 1923
Priority dateOct 23, 1923
Publication numberUS 1935656 A, US 1935656A, US-A-1935656, US1935656 A, US1935656A
InventorsMortimer Charles W
Original AssigneeBarrett Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shingle strip
US 1935656 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 21, 1933. c w MORTMER 1,935,656

SHINGLE STRIP Filed Oct. 23, 1925 Patented Nov. 21, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SHINGLE s'rmr ol New Jersey Application October 23, 1923. Serial No. 670,260 3 Claims. (01. 1087) This invention relates to shingles or shingle strips comprising a plurality of single shingles joined together and the process of producing the same. It relates more particularly to the type of shingles that is formed by saturating a felt base with a waterproofing material, coating the same with a plastic material and applying thereto a layer of mineral wear resisting material, although it is not restricted to this type of shingle making materials.

By the invention, a shingle or shingle strip may be produced which presents an attractive appearance when installed on a roof, gives opportunity for securing a variety' .of effects and may be produced with a waste of very little, if any, material, and at the same time is easy to install and does not require an inordinate amount of material to cover a roof.

The invention will be understood by reference to the description and the accompanying drawing, in which v Fig. 1 shows how the shingles or shingle strips may be cut from a sheet of roofing material;

Fig. 2 shows a modification oi the same;

Fig. 3 shows how the shingles may be installed upon a roof; and

Fig. 4 shows a difierent way of installing the same shingles.

In the drawing, reference character 1 indicates a sheet of roofing material which may be cut or slit so as to form the shingles or shingle strips disclosed in this application. When the sheet 1 is wide enough to form two shingle strips,-the same will be cut or slit along the zig-zag lines 2 and 3 near its edges and along itsint'ermediate portion following the line 4 so as to divide the sheet into two strips. The cutting or slitting of the sheet along the lines 2 and 3 will form. one edge of the strips with triangularly-shaped tabs or projections 9 and cutting or slitting the sheet along the lines 4 will form strips having tabs or shingle-likeextensions 5 consisting of rectan-- gularly-shaped portions 6 and largerirectangularly-shaped portions '7, which rectangular portions are joined by diagonal lines 8. The tabs or projections on each strip are separated from each other by spaces of the same shape and size as the tabs or projections themselves so that the cut out portions between the tabs on one strip form the tabs on the adjacent strip and the sum of the areas of the tabs on one side of a strip is substantially equal to the sum of the areasoi the spaces cut out to form the tabs. The triangular projections or tabs 9 are so spaced that the vertices of these tabs are opposite the middle points of tabs 5 on the same strip or in other words the shingle-like projections 5 are oppositely disposed with respect to the narrow triangular tabs 9. The sheetl will also be out at intervals along the lines 10 across the narrowest portions of the shingle strips so as to divide the same into single shingles, each having tabs 5 and 9, or into strips comprising two or more of these single shingles.

In the modification shown in Fig. 2 the roofing sheet 1' is similarly out along its edges to form the tabs 9. The sheet is so cut or slit along the intermediate line 4 as to form tabs or projections which are defined by lines 6' perpendicular to the length of the sheet and lines 8 at an acute angle thereto, thus forming tabs or projections somewhat pointed in shape and separated by spaces of the same shape and size as the tabs themselves.

After the strips have been cut as indicated, for example, in Fig. 1, they may be installed as shown in Fig. 3 with the tabs 5 extending downwardly, the lower extremities 11 of each overlying strip being so placed that it coincides with the line 12 defining the extremity of the cut out portion of so the next lower shingle strip and so one for the successive layers in horizontal rows. In this way a double thickness of roofing material will be visible to the observer at the lines corresponding to the lines 11 and 12 over the entire area of the covered roof.

When the shingles are installed as indicated in Fig. 4, the other edge, that is the edge of the strip having the triangularly-shaped tabs 9, is exposed as indicated, the next strip above being so placed that the vertices of the triangular portions are staggered thus exposing somewhat hexagonallyshaped figures to the observer. The installations indicated in Figs. 3 and 4am the reverse of each other, the observer seeing in the one case six- 9&3 sided figures exposed and in the other case, twelvesided figures covering the entire roof as shown. The shape of these figures will depend upon the shape and length of the respective lines defining the tabs as well as the slope of the diagonal lines along which the sheet was out. By having the altitude oi the triangular tabs 9 equal to the altitude of the tabs 5 along the other edge of the strips, four-sided figures would be exposed when the strips are installed according to the showing 10' in Fig. 4 as the point of or extreme end of each triangular tab would coincide with the points that are the extremities of the cut out portions between the triangular tabs of a lower shingle strip.

These installations avoid the danger of leakage 11.

as it is obvious in order for water to get inside the roof, it would be necessary for it to travel or be blown upward from the point P to the point P (Fig. 3) or a corresponding distance when the installation is as indicated in Fig. 4 and this distance from the point P to the point P' may be made as long as desirable by having the width of the narrowest portion of the strips properly proportioned with respect to the length of the tabs. It is obvmithat the joint between the abutting ends of the 's 'ingle strips in horizontal rows as indicated in dotted lines 10 (Fig. 3) will be protected against leakage as this space is covered by the tab of an overlying strip and has underlying the same, a triangular tab of an underlying strip. Certain areas of the roof deck are covered with three layers of material, other areas are covered with two layers and still other areas are covered with a single layer or thickness of material, the size of these respective areas depending upon the dimensions of the tabs with respect to the width of the shingle strips.

The waste of material that occurs because of cutting along the lines 2 and 3 near the edge or the roof can be decreased by having sheets wide enough to cut more than two rows of shingle strips at the same time longitudinally of the sheet of roofing material. The shingle strips may be cut transversely from a sheet of roofing material by cutting across the sheet zig-zag lines to form the triangular tabs and other lines across the sheet between the zig-zag lines the other lines corresponding in outline to the tabs or projections desired along the other edge of the shingle strip.

In the claims the expression shingle strip is intended to include individual shingles as well as a plurality of shingles united to form a shingle strip.

I claim: I

1. A shingle strip having one longitudinal edge formed with spaced triangular tabs, the sum of the areas of the tabs being substantially equal to the sum of the areas of the spaces upon said edge, said shingle strip having the other edge formed with shingle-like spaced extensions each comprising two rectangular portions joined by sloping lines, the sum of the areas of the shinglelike extensions being substantially equal to the sum of the areas of the intervening spaces, said triangular tabs being oppositely disposed with respect to said shingle-like extensions.

2. A shingle strip having one longitudinal edge formed with spaced narrow triangular tabs, said shingle strip having the other edge formed with shingle-like spaced extensions each comprising two rectangular portions joined by sloping lines, said triangular tabs being oppositely disposed with respect to said shingle-like extensions.

3. A shingle strip having one longitudinal edge formed with spaced tabs, the sum of the areas of said tabs being substantially equal to the sum of the areas of the spaces upon said edge, said shingle strip having the other edge formed with spaced shingle-like extensions of a shape different from the shape of said tabs, the sum 01' the areas of the shingle-like extensions being substantially. equal to the sum of the areas of the spaces on said other edge, said shingle-like extensions being oppositely disposed with respect to said tabs.

CHARLES W. MORTIMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5471801 *Sep 1, 1994Dec 5, 1995Gs Roofing Products Company, Inc.Hip and ridge asphalt roof covering
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/555, 52/557, D25/139
International ClassificationE04D1/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26