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Publication numberUS1936089 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1933
Filing dateSep 15, 1932
Priority dateSep 15, 1932
Publication numberUS 1936089 A, US 1936089A, US-A-1936089, US1936089 A, US1936089A
InventorsHenry R. Jacquerod
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for printing for the blind
US 1936089 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 21, 1933- R JACQUEROD 1,936,089

PROCESS FOR PRINTING FOR THE BLIND Filed Sept. 15, 1932 INVENTOR- Hagg R. Jawv aop ATTORNEY- Patented Nov. 21, 1933 UNITED sT rEs PATENT OFFICE Application September 15, 1932 Serial No. 633,237

12 Claims.

- up from the back leaving a cavity in the back) is used for reading by the sense of touch. Such raised. characters generally are composed of different arrangements of dots. This type of printing is very expensive, but not very durable in that after repeated reading-the readers fingers pass so many times over the raised surfaces that they become worn and cannot be read further. In order to make the printing as durable as possi ble very thick paper is used and consequently the books so printed are very thick but contain very little printing matter. T

To better understandthe invention the old process used in printing for the blind is now given. A special machine having a key board with six keys and a control, is arranged so that any combination of the keys produce a corresponding arrangement of pins which are adapted to correspondingly form a special kind of matrix. This matrix is composed of two zinc sheets; or other soft materi-.-com1ected together on one end. The machine operates very similarly to a typewriter to form the matrix, these matrix sheets moving to new positions upon each operation of the control. The paper sheet material is next formed by placing the paper between the sheets of the matrix and applying pressure thus embossing the paper. n a

It is an object of this invention to provide a process whereby the monotype, linotype, or any other similar machine or hand set type may be used to form the characters for blind printing and whereby the paper may be printed upon a conventional letter press printing press or similar press. The gaining of this object is of great advantage for various reasons. First of all the monotype, linotype, and other machines are highly developed comparedwith the crude machines now used exclusively for printing for the blind. The superior development of the linotype and monotype, etc. is due to the fact that it is used in regular printing. Furthermore the feature which allows the paper to be printed at a regular printing press is so great an advantageaover the printing of sheets from the matrices previously here explained that there is absolutely no comparison between the two as regards speed. The reason for this lies in the fact that the printing machines are highly developed, since they are used for regular printing, as contrasted with the apparatus used for printing for the blind.

It is a still further object of this invention to reinforce the raised characters on the paper material on their under side. The ascertaining of this object is a tremendous improvement over the present reading material for the blind. When the raised characters are reinforced these characters are more durable under the wearing action of the tips of the fingers during reading. Further a thinner sheet of paper may be used and consequently the book printed is much thinner but contains much more reading matter inrelation to books printed according to present methods.

A still further object of this invention is to take advantage of the printing press for the application of adhesive on the under side of the raised characters which is adapted to hold the reinforcement material. I

The invention still further proposes the provision of a process as mentioned which is simple and which may be efficiently carried out in practice.

For further comprehension of the invention, andof the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are moreparticularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawing forming a material part of this disclosure:-

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary plan view of a sheet of paper printed according to this invention.

Fig. 2 is .a fragmentary enlarged sectional view taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1. 90

To understand the invention the following is given as one of themost approved sequences of steps to carry out the process: e I

First type is set on the monotype, linotype or other machine or hand set and used as a male die. 7 The standard machines and type may be slightly altered so as to have the necessary characters for reading by the blind. Next a female die should be formed-from the male die. This preferably should be done by placing the male die within a conventional printing press and causing the press to engage the male die against a material which now forms the female die. The dies and press are now ready to print according. to this inventiom' r The press should be run in a conventional manner and the sheet material passed in between the male'and female dies. The maledie should be-wetted with adhesive material so as to 11c engage into the under sides of the raised characters formed by the printing. Preferably the adhesive material should be printers ink, but might be any other material.

Next a resinous material or shellac, or fusible powder or other material should be engaged upon the rear side of the printed sheet while the ink or adhesiveis still wet. Thefinal step is the application of heat to cause it'to fuse to the adhesive. When it becomes hard it serves to reinforce the characters. Material which sets instead of fuses may also: be used to accomplish the reinforcing and so eliminate the heating step. Also material which sets or fuses and itself sticks may be used and so the step of applying the adhesive may be eliminated.

In Figs. 1 and 2, a sheet of paper printed according to this invention has been disclosed. Reference numeral 10 indicates the paper upon which the blind characters 11 are arranged. These characters are formed by pressing the paper up from the back so as to form a cavity 12 on the back side of the paper. Within this cavity there is engaged adhesive material 13, engaged therein by printing as previously described. Reinforcement material 14 is fused together with this adhesive material preferably by dusting powered resinous or other fusible material or material which is capable of setting and sticking to the adhesive material 14, upon the back side of the sheet 10 so as to fill in the cavities, 12. If the material 14 is of the fusible type the printed sheetmust be passed through a suitable heater tov cause fusing.

It should be understood that the raised characters 11 are produced on a conventional printing press by a male and female die. Further it must be borne in mind that the male die is inked by the conventional printing press with printers ink or adhesive material so that simultaneously with the printing which causes the raising of the characters, the adhesive material is deposited within the cavities on the back side of the sheet. While this adhesive material is still wet, or in adhesive condition, the reinforce-' ment material 14 is engaged in place. 7

It will be readily understood that printed matter according to this invention will bemore durable than printed matter according to previous processes. When the blind' read printed matter they pass their fingersover the raised characters, which, after continuous use wear down and become unreadable, but withthe reinforcement'upon the under side of the raised characters they maintain their raised conditions for'much greater wear and tear during use. 'In' addition the sheet material 10 may be of thinner material than ordinary blind printing in that the strength of the material itself is not depended upon for maintaining of the raised characters in proper reading condition.

While I have illustrated and described my invention with some degree of particularly, I realize that in practice various alterationstherein may be made. I therefore reserve the right and privilege of changing the form of the details of construction or otherwise altering the arrangement of the correlated parts without departing from the spirit or the scope of the: appended claims. 7

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:-

1. Printed matter for the blind, comprising sheet material having characters raisedfrom the surface forced up from the under sides and rein forcement material in the under side of each of the raised portions of the characters and within the bottom surface of said sheet material.

2. Printed matter for the blind, comprising sheet material having characters raised from the surface forced up from the under side and reinforcement material. in the under side of each of the raised pcrtionsof the characters and within the bottom surface of said sheet material, said reinforcement material being fusible material adhesively engaged in place.

3. Printed matter for the blind, comprising sheet'material having characters'raised from the surface forced up from the under sides and reinforcement material in the under side of each of the raised portions of the characters and within the bottom surface of said sheet material, said reinforcement material being fusible material adhesively engaged in place, said fusible material being a powder.

4. Printed matter for the blind, comprising sheet material having characters raised from the surface forced up from the under side and reinforcement material in the under side of each of the raised portions of the characters and within the bottom surface of said sheet material, said reinforcement material being a fusible powder fused into place.

5. Printed matter for the blind, comprising sheet material having characters raised from the surface forced up from the under side and reinforcement material in the under side of each of the raised portions of the characters and within the bottom surface of said sheet material, said reinforcement material comprising adhesive material engaged in the under sides of said charac ters, and fusible material fused together with said adhesive material.

6. Printed matter for the blind, comprising sheet material having characters raised from the surface forced up from the under sides and rein-' forcement material in the under side of each of the raised portions of the characters and within the bottom surface of said, sheet material, said reinforcement material comprising adhesive material engaged in the under sides of said characters, and fusible material fused together with said adhesive material, said adhesive material being printers ink.

'7. A process for'printing for the blind, consisting of printing material with a male and female die, adding adhesive material on said male die during the printing to engage it on the under side of said raised characters, and while the adhesive is still active, applying and fusing material therewith to reinforce the characters.

8. A process for printing for the blind, consist ing of printing material with a male die and a female die, adding adhesive material on said male die during the printing to engage it on the under side of said raised characters, and while the adhesive is still active, applying and fusing material therewith to reinforce the characters, said adhesive material being printers ink. I

9. A process for printing for the blind, consisting of printing material with a male and female die, adding adhesive material on said male die during the printing to engage it on the under side of said raised characters, and while the ading of using characters asa male die, forming ;a 5

female die from said male die, printing sheet material from said male and female dies, applying adhesive material on said male die during printing to engage the adhesive material upon the under side of the raised characters, placing fusible powder in the raised characters, and applying heat to fuse the powder to said adhesive material.

11. A process for printing for the blind, consisting of using characters as a male die, forming a. female die from said male die, printing sheet material from said male and female dies, applying adhesive material on said male die during printing to engage the adhesive material upon the un-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3132962 *Jun 18, 1962May 12, 1964Burroughs CorpRecord means and method of making same
US3197889 *Sep 21, 1960Aug 3, 1965Micropoulou Evangelia AMethod of forming letters and numbers readable by the blind
US5993089 *Feb 3, 1997Nov 30, 1999Burrell, Iv; James William8-bit binary code for use as an 8-dot braille arrangement and data entry system and method for 8-key chordic binary keyboards
US6227572Mar 1, 1999May 8, 2001Eric A. LyenDurable tactile indicia for banknotes/documents and method of making same
WO2000051824A1 *Feb 29, 2000Sep 8, 2000Canadian Bank Note Company, LimitedTactile markings for banknotes and method of making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/32, 156/219, 101/368
International ClassificationB41M3/16, B41M3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41M3/16
European ClassificationB41M3/16