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Publication numberUS1936143 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1933
Filing dateMay 23, 1928
Priority dateMay 23, 1928
Publication numberUS 1936143 A, US 1936143A, US-A-1936143, US1936143 A, US1936143A
InventorsShea Bernard F
Original AssigneeShea Bernard F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf practice apparatus
US 1936143 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 21, 1933. B. F. SHEA GOLF PRACTICE APPARATUS Filed May 23. 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet l B. F. SHEA 1,936,143

GOLF PRACTICE APPARATUS Nov. 21, 1933.

Filed May 23, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 no r v aiku m4 mifdm Nov. 21, 1933. SHEA GOLF PRACTICE APPARATUS Filed May 23, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Nov. 21, 1933. B. F. SHEA GOLF PRACTICE APPARATUS Filed May 23, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 a 40014 t o z Bf/P/VARD E SHE/1 95 M flaw W QM Patented Nov. 21, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 22 Claims.

This invention relates to golf practice apparatus. More particularly, the invention relates to instrumentalities whereby a golf player's stance may be improved or practiced.

In order that the flight of a golf ball be true and that it may not deviate to one side or the other in its flight, it is necessary that the face of the club strike the golf ball in a plane normal to the intended direction of flight. This precision with which the golf ball is struck has been found to be dependent upon the accuracy with which the head of a golf club is caused to travel in an are including the center of the ball. It has been found by experience that the head of the golf club travels through the major portion of the stroke in the arc of a circle of which the players head is the center or, at any rate, that if the player's head is maintained without vertical or lateral movement during the stroke that the head of the golf club remains in the required arc and strikes the ball squarely.

One object of the present invention is, therefore, the provision of practicing devices which shall hold the players head against movement in vertical or lateral directions, but which will not interfere with the proper swinging of the club.

Accordingly a helmet or head brace is provid- \.ed, properly supported against movement, in which the player places his head. More particularly, such devices are adjustable to permit the head holding device to be regulated for the highth of the player and for his normal stance.

One of the features which assists in keeping the head in proper position is the maintenance of the hips against lateral movement. In other words, during the swing the hips should substantially pivot about the axis of the body, but should not move laterally, because they would then carry the head to one side also. The present invention therefore, also seeks a device which will retain the hips against substantial lateral movement while affording ample facility for pivotal movement. To this 'end a brace is provided formed of a pair of rigid arms adapted to receive the hips therebetween.

The accuracy with which the ball is struck depends also in some measure upon the position taken by the player in addressing the ball, that is, upon the position of the feet. Some players are in the habit of playing in what is called a closed stance, that is, with both heels on a line parallel to the proposed flight of the ball while others play in what is called an open stance in' which the left foot is dropped back slightly from such a line. The present invention therefore also contemplates the provision of foot rests which are movable relative to one another, so that the player's feet may be substantially held in the desired relative position.

It has furthermore been found that the dis- 60 placement of the hips during a swing is also contributed to by the displacement of the left heel. This invention therefore further has for its object the positioning of the left foot to prevent the left heel moving outwardly and contributing to the displacement of the hips. Accordingly, the left foot rest is desirably formed with a heel brace within which theheel of the foot is disposed.

Still another object of the invention is an instrumentality whereby the foregoing objects may be realized and which shall be practical from the standpoint of ease and cheapness of manufacture and convenience in use.

These and other objects of the invention and the means for their attainment will be more apparent from the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, illustrating embodiments by which the invention may be realized, and in which:

Figure 1 is a view, in perspective, showing the golf practice apparatus according to this invention, a player being indicated in outline.

Figure 2 is a detail view showing the head positioning element and its means for adjustment.

Figure 3 is a vertical sectional view taken on the plane indicated by the line 3-3 in Figure 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional detail view on the line 4-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a section taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a section Figure 3.

Figure '7 is a detail view showing the hip positioning device in side elevation.

Figure 8 is a plan view of the structure shown in Figure 7.

Figure 9 is a detail view of Figure 8.

Figure 10 is a sectional view taken on the line 100 10l0 of Figure '7.

Figure 11 is a detail view, in plan of the foot rests.

Figure 12 is a section taken on the line 12-12 of Figure 11.

Figure 13 shows a modification of the invention wherein the helmet and hip brace are both supported from the same standard.

The several instrumentalities whereby the player is prevented from moving out of the proper ll0 taken on the line 6-6 of taken on the line 9-9 stance are adapted to be mounted upon or carried with a base 20, 21 which conveniently may also serve as the container for the several parts when not in use.

As shown, the base is formed in two parts 20 and 21 each having the general configuration of a tray with bottoms 22, 23, respectively, and walls 24 and 25. One of the adjacent walls, say 24, may be provided with hook-like engaging parts 26 adapted to overlie the adjacent wall 25 of the other tray 21 and thus hold the two rigidly together when in use. In one of these trays, say 21, there may be disposed a cocoanut fibre mat 27 or the like upon which the golf ball 28 may be placed and from which it may be driven. In the other tray 20, and with its top surface in the same plane as the top of the cocoamat 27 there may be disposed a platform 29 upon which the player, indicated in broken lines at 30, practicing his stance, may stand. This platform 29 is adapted to be removable and replaceable by a cocoa-mat, say, if advantage is not to be taken of the foot rests or feet positioning members 31,

32 which will be described more fully hereinafter.

At corresponding points in remote walls of the respective trays 20 and 21, brackets 35 and 36 are adapted to be positioned, preferably removably fastened to the bottom and side walls and which brackets are adapted to receive standards 3'? and 38 holding the respective head and hip positioning instrumentalities. The standard 3'7 supporting the helmet or head brace 40 is conveniently a tubular element formed in two parts for convenience in packing and adapted to be secured together in any convenient fashion which will permit the sleeve 41 to pass from one section to the other. This sleeve 41 has an inner diameter to be slidably received on the standard 37 and is formed inwardly with a recess 42 within which is secured, as by a rivet 43, a leaf spring 44 adapted to be yieldingly driven against the standard 3'7 to grip the same along practically the entire length of the leaf spring by means of a set screw 45 threaded into a boss 46 near the upper part of the sleeve 41 and having an enlarged and irregular head 47 to facilitate grasp by the hand. Through the instrumentality of the spring, the finish of the standard is not marred. The sleeve 41 also carries a bearing portion 48 formed with a rectangular passage 49 horizontally therethrough which is adapted to receive a slide 50 supporting the head brace 40. The passage 49 is also recessed as at 51 to receive a plate spring 52 adapted to bear over substantially its entire area on the slide 50 and to be pressed thereagainst by a set screw 53 similar to the screw 45 holding the sleeve 41 in place on the standard 37.

The outer extremity 56 of the slide 50 is bifurcated (Fig. 4) and both ears 5'7 and 58 comprising the bifurcated end are formed with rectangular apertures 59, 60 respectively. The head brace or helmet 40 is carried at the outer end of an arm 61. If desired it may be pivotally mounted or swivelled thereon as at 62 so that the players neck may turn. The inner end 63 of the arm 61 is received between the ears 5'7, 58. This end 63 of the arm 61 may be formed, on each side, with frusto-conical recesses 64 and is apertured, as at 65, to receive a locking bolt 66. Also disposed be tween the ears 5'7 and 58 and adjacent the end 63 of the arm 61 is a washer 67 having a rectangular apertured boss 68 on one side which is positioned within the rectangular aperture 60 in the ear 58. The bolt 66 is adapted to draw the ears 5'7, 58 together into clamping engagement with the end 63 of the arm 61 and hold it rigidly in adjusted position. The bolt 66 is preferably formed with a large disc-like head 69 adapted to engage the outside of one of the ears, say 57, and with a squared shank portion '70 to be received within the rectangular aperture 59 in the car 57 and to be thus held against rotation. The parts are drawn into clamping engagement with each other by a nut 71 engaging the threaded end of the bolt 66 and bearing against the squared boss 68 on the washer 5'7.

When, therefore a player takes his position upon the platform 29, and assumes the correct stance, the sleeve 41 may be moved up or down the standard 37 to the proper position and secured at that point by means of the set screw 45. The slide 50 may then be moved back and forth in the passage 49 until the head brace 40 is in approximately proper position to engage the head of the player and secured in that position by means of the set screw 53. The final adjustment may be effected so that the helmet 40 may hold the players head at the desired elevation by the angular adjustment of the arm 61 while the bolt 66 is loosened. It may then be clamped in position by tightening the nut 71 on the bolt 66. It will be noted that the passage 49 and slide 50 are at one side of the standard 37. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the golf player in standing over the ball, carries the greater weight upon the right leg so that a vertical plane passing through the center of gravity of the players body is nearer the right foot than the left. The head, being also substantially bisected by this plane, is therefore to one side of the center line as defined by the standards 37 and 38. It is for this reason that the slide 50 and therewith the helmet is preferably disposed at one side of the standard 3'7'and is thus in proper position in the embodiment shown.

As the object of this device is not only to keep the head from being raised during the stroke but also to keep it from being lowered, or in other words, to maintain it in its proper position, it may be found convenient to provide an elastic chin strap 73 on the helmet 40 adapted to be passed under the chin to prevent the head from moving away from the helmet 40. The helmet may be suitably cushioned or padded in the interest of comfort, as shown at 74.

The bracket 36 on the opposite end of the base is adapted to receive an extensible standard formed by an outer cylindrical bottom portion 38 and a telescoping part 77 slidable therein and adjustably positioned by means of the set screw 78. This extensible portion '77 of the standard is provided at its upper end with a head '79, formed with a horizontally extending passage 80 adapted to receive the slide 81 carrying the hip brace. This passage 80 in head 79 is also formed with a recess 82 containing a spring plate 83 by which the slide 81 may be engaged over a material area thereof and clamped in place under the influence of the set screw 84. At its outer extremity, the hip slide 81 is of reduced diameter as at 85 or is cut away above as at 86 and similarly cut away below as at 8'7. It is formed with a pivot hole 88 and a pin hole 89, and carries an eye 90 to which a pin 91 may be attached with a chain.

A bifurcated bearing member 94 is pivotally mounted upon the end of the slide 81 by means of the pivot pin 95 which passes through registerprevent the left heel from moving outwardly dur-.

ing holes in the ears 96, 97 and the pivot hole 88 and this bearing member 94 is adapted to receive the adjustable hip brace. As illustrated, the hip brace comprises a pair of arms 98, 99 adjustable or movable with respect to one another and having an extended bearing surface to bear upon the hips. These arms 98, 99 are secured, respectively, to telescoping slides 100, 101 disposed within the bearing 94 and movable with respect to one another therein to vary the distance between the arms 98, 99 to accommodate players whose hips differ in width. At the top the bearing member is provided with a set screw 102 adapted to exert pressure through the instrumentality of the plate spring 103 upon the telescoping slides 100, 101 to secure the arms 98, 99 adjustably in position. If desired, the players body may be secured within the hip brace by means of a belt 104 which may be conveniently passed between the extremities of the arms as shown in Figure 8. To this end, the bearing surface of the arms may be apertured as at 105.

It may be found desirable to permit the hip brace to turn in a horizontal plane about its pivot because of the extreme pivot taken by some players in a full swing. To this end, one of the ears, say 96, on the bearing member 94 is of increased length and is adapted to be releasably secured to the slide 81 by means of the pin 91 passing through cooperating holes in the slide 81 and ear 96.

The platform 29 for use when the position of the feet is to be controlled is illustrated in Figures 11 and 12 as well as in Figure 1. The platform 29, which may be of any convenient material, is formed with a transversely extending slot 110 and with two longitudinally extending but shorted and parallel slots 111 and 112 opening into the transverse slot 110 at one side, and at the left end. The foot brace for the right foot is shown as formed by a sole shaped pad 32 of a shape commensurate with the human foot and having an ear 113 on one side by which a clamping screw 114 may secure the foot brace in position, the head of the clamping screw 114 being slidable in a recess 115 beneath the slot 110. The foot brace 31 for the left foot is similarly shaped but the ear for the clamping screw 116 is disposed on the opposite side thereof. For the closed stance, the left foot brace clamping stud 116 is maintained in the transverse slot 110 but for an open stance the clamping ostud 116 is adapted to be directed into either one of the longitudinal slots 111 or 112 depending upon the desired spacing of the feet. Of course, the foot braces 31, 32 are rotatable about their clamping studs so that their axes will extend in any desired direction. If desired, and in order to ing the swing, which is to be avoided, the left foot brace 31 may be formed with a heel plate 118 within which the players heel may be positioned.

1n the modification illustrated in Figure 13 the helmet 40 is supported from the standard 38 by means of a flexible arm 120 which may be suitably mounted upon the head 19 in the form of a goose neck and may be curved to lie closely adjacent the players body so as to be out of the way of the golf club in its swing.

It will thus be seen that the devices are provided to position the players head during the practice of the-swing so that the head will not move vertically or laterally, while at the same time, if desired, permitting the neck to be turned. There are also provided devices by which the hips are prevented from lateral movement although pivotal movement of the body is permitted. Furthermore the feet may be fixed for either a closed stance or an open stance. The entire apparatus is such that it may be taken down and packed within one of the trays forming the base while the other tray may be used as a cover and thus the minimum space occupied in storage.

Various modifications will occur to those skilled in the art in the composition and configuration of the various component elements going to make up the golf practice apparatus as a whole. Furthermore certain of the component elements are capable of use independently of others as well as in conjunction with certain others of them. No limitation is intended by the phraseology of the foregoing description or illustrations in the accompanying drawings except as indicated in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Golf practice apparatus comprising a base receptacle, a standard, a sleeve adjustable on the standard, a slide adjustably carried with the sleeve, an arm carried by and adjustable in the plane of the slide, a head brace carried with the arm. 7

2. Golf practice apparatus comprising an adjustable standard, a slide adjustably carried with the standard, a bearing pivotally carried with the slide and expansible stops for the players hips adjustably carried with the bearing.

3. Golf practice apparatus comprising a platform formed with a transverse slot, a foot pad and a locking stud in the slot and carried with the foot pad.

4. Golf practice apparatus comprising a platform with a transverse slot and a longitudinally extending slot communicating therewith, a foot pad and a locking stud in the slot and carried with the foot pad.

5. Golf practice apparatus comprising a platform formed with a transverse slot, a foot pad and a locking stud in the slot and carried with the foot pad, said pad having a heel positioning portion.

6. Golf practice apparatus comprising a pair of trays, means to position the trays adjacent one another, a standard carried with each tray, a head restraining element adjustably carried with one 125 standard and a hip restraining element carried with the other standard.

'7. Golf practice apparatus comprising a pair of trays, means to position the trays adjacent one another, a standard carried with each tray, a head restraining element adjustably carried with one standard, a hip restraining element carried with the other standard and feet positioning elements carried with one of the trays.

8. Golf practice apparatus comprising a platform formed with a transverse slot and a plurality of longitudinally extending slots communicating therewith, a foot pad and a locking stud movable in the slots and carried with the foot pad.

9. Golf practice apparatus comprising a platform formed with a transverse slot and a longitudinally extending slot communicating therewith and a pair of foot pads slidable in said slots.

10. Golf practice apparatus comprising a platform formed with a transverse slot and a longitudinally extending slot communicating therewith, a pair of adjustable foot pads and locking means carried by each pad and engageable in said slots.

11. Golf practice apparatus comprising a plat- 50 form formed with a transverse slot and, a longitudinally extending slot communicating therewith, a pair of foot pads adjustable in said slots, locking means carried by each pad and engageable in said slots, said pads being adjustable rotatably.

12. Golf practice apparatus comprising a platform formed with a transverse slot and a longitudinally extending slot communicating therewith, a pair of foot pads adjustable in said slots, locking means carried by each pad and engageable in said slots, said pads being adjustable rotatably about said locking means as a pivot.

13. Golf practice apparatus comprising a standard, a sleeve on the standard, a slide carried with the sleeve, an arm pivoted on the slide and movable in the plane thereof and a head brace carried with the arm.

14. Golf practice apparatus comprising a base receptacle, a standard, a sleeve adjustable on the standard, a slide adjustably carried with the sleeve, an arm carried by and adjustable in the plane of the slide and a head brace pivotally carried with the arm.

15. Golf practice apparatus comprising a swivelled helmet in which the skull portion of the player's head is disposed, means to prevent movement of translation of the helmet and a chin strap to retain the head against downward movement with respect to the helmet.

16. Golf practice apparatus comprising a swivelled helmet in which the skull portion of the players head is disposed, means to prevent movement of translation of the helmet and a chin strap to retain the head against movement with respect to the helmet.

17. Golf practice apparatus comprising a swivelled helmet in which the skull portion of the player's head is disposed, means to prevent movement of translation of the helmet and a chin strap to retain the chin against movement with respect to the helmet.

18. Golfv practice apparatus comprising a universally adjustable support, a helmet carried by said support and means whereby the helmet may pivot about the axis of turning of a player's head. v

19. Golf practice apparatus comprising a helmet provided with a pivot pin, a support having a bearing receiving said pivot pin, and means to adjust the support whereby the pivot pin may lie in any angle to the vertical.

20. Golf practice apparatus comprising a standard, a sleeve adjustably carried with the standard, a slide carried in the sleeve and reciprocable therein at an angle to the standard, an arm pivotally carried with the slide and adjustable in one plane therewith and head engaging means carried on the arm.

21. Golf practice apparatus comprising a support, laterally extending means carried thereby to oppose backward movement of the hips and to guide the hips in lateral movement thereof, and arms to limit lateral movement of the hips adjustably carried on said means and means permitting pivotal movement of said laterally extending means.

22. Golf practice apparatus comprising a standard, a sleeve slidable on the standard, means to secure the sleeve in adjustable position on the standard, a bearing carried with the sleeve, a slide carried solely in the bearing, means to adjustably secure the slide in the bearing, an arm pivoted to the end of the slide, means to secure the arm in adjusted position with respect to the slide, a helmet swivelled on the arm and in which the skull portion of the player's head is disposed and chin engaging means to retain the head against movement with respect to the helmet.

BERNARD F. SHEA.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2531853 *Jul 12, 1948Nov 28, 1950Larman Julius ESnapper party hat
US2611610 *May 16, 1950Sep 23, 1952Rikuo Hara JamesMechanical golf player's stance positioner
US2626151 *Jan 28, 1949Jan 20, 1953Jenks George M TroutmanGolf practicing apparatus
US2690911 *Jan 25, 1951Oct 5, 1954Newgren Arvid ETraining device for golfers
US3079152 *Jun 24, 1960Feb 26, 1963Gilbert Cushing EugeneGolf practicing device
US3215438 *Dec 22, 1961Nov 2, 1965Levinson David JHip movement training device for golfers
US3415524 *Jan 28, 1965Dec 10, 1968Robert M. VickersGolf swing training apparatus
US3510135 *Sep 25, 1967May 5, 1970Gentile Vincent LTraining device for golfers
US4513972 *May 2, 1983Apr 30, 1985Empie John EGolfer's head movement restraining device
US4659084 *Aug 16, 1985Apr 21, 1987Vuick Michael CGolf swing training apparatus
US4993716 *Apr 20, 1990Feb 19, 1991Waller Malcolm CGolf stance alignment device
US5830079 *Dec 5, 1997Nov 3, 1998Charles S. Fizer, IIIStance and movement swing training apparatus for golf and other sports
US6343998 *Oct 5, 1999Feb 5, 2002Joseph Leonard TarulliGolf swing practice apparatus
US6375582Oct 10, 2001Apr 23, 2002George P. HarrisGolf swing aid with alignment and positioning rule
US6497627Mar 28, 2001Dec 24, 2002Michael D. CollinsGolf swing instructional device and method
US6575844Feb 24, 2001Jun 10, 2003Richard R. Gray, Jr.Golf stance and movement training device
US6843730 *Aug 12, 2003Jan 18, 2005Miro D. BellagambaGolf training apparatus
US6988957Sep 8, 2003Jan 24, 2006Benolt, LlcGolf swing training method and apparatus
US7150683Feb 13, 2006Dec 19, 2006Benolt, LlcGolf swing training method and apparatus
US7591734May 5, 2008Sep 22, 2009Jeff MazzoneGolf swing aid
US7815518 *Oct 14, 2008Oct 19, 2010Doyle Robert STraining apparatus for improving a golf swing
US8079917 *Oct 13, 2010Dec 20, 2011Doyle Robert STraining apparatus for improving an athletes swing
US8308580May 9, 2011Nov 13, 2012Raymond Felix JasinskiGolf alignment and posture training device
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/208, 473/271, 473/216
International ClassificationA63B69/00, A63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2225/09, A63B69/3673, A63B69/3608, A63B69/0059
European ClassificationA63B69/36B