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Publication numberUS1936151 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1933
Filing dateFeb 28, 1930
Priority dateFeb 28, 1930
Publication numberUS 1936151 A, US 1936151A, US-A-1936151, US1936151 A, US1936151A
InventorsAllen Jr George, Simpson Fredrick C
Original AssigneeGeorge Allen & Son, Allen Jr George
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Furnace setting
US 1936151 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 'Nov. 21, 1933. G ALLEN. JR T AL 1,936,151

FURNACE SETTING Filed Feb. 28, 1930 2 Sheets-Sheet l IN ENTOR 680,91? 6120 J! z'ed 7-: 046 $707,050"

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ATTOR EYS NOV. 21, 1933; G ALLEN, JR" r AL 1,936,151

FURNACE SETTI'NG FiledfFeb. 28, 1930 2 sheets-4585 2- Course Z7 Course 24* 17L 1g E V i f f 29 A A 5 i I 10 7 I I 23 6' L (ha/3'6 Z6 0 00/56 Z5 2 g 5 Q i K 19 B A 537 5 A X 1' f g0 15 y 57 5 I i/ 5 5 /'g. 10

ATTORNEYS Patented Nov. 21, 1933 PATENT OFFICE 1,936,151 FURNACE SETTING George Allen, Jr., New York, N. Y., and Fredrick C. Simpson, West SomervilleyMass, assignors" to George Allen & Son, a firm consisting of Jane Allen, William Allen, and George Allen, In, all of New York, N. Y.

Application February 28, 1930. Serial No. {132,056

12 Claims. I (Cl. 72-491) This invention relates to expansion joints for a furnace setting. v

-An object of our inventionis to build a furnace setting having an expansion joint comprising a vertical slot'extending through a plurality of tile or brick courses.

Another object of the invention is to provide for the staggering of the tiles or bricks in adjacent courses in building such a slot;

stillanother object of the invention is to build an expansion joint which provides for the unequal expansion between the inner and outer rows of furnace tile.

It is common practice to lay furnace tile or brick in one direction for a number of coursesand at regular intervals to layvone course at'right angles thereto, in order to lend strength to the furnace setting. .The jointsbetweenthe tiles or bricks in each course are staggered with reference to joints in adjacent courses, and as it is desirable that a uniform expansion joint be provided extending the :height of the furnace setting, some means must be provided to maintain this staggered ar-' rangement of the tile or. brick with such a joint. To this end we provide a pair of special tiles shaped in the form of an L and having dimensions which-are multiples of one-half the width of anormal'tile. The width of one of these tiles is a different multiple of one-half the width-of .a normal tile than is thewidth of the other, and by properly positioning the two L-shaped tiles a straight slot may be formed, still maintaining, however, the'tile joints in their staggered relation. Due to the difference in heating of the inner and outer rows of brick, less expansion occurs in the latter, for which reason it may be filled with A better understanding of the invention may be had-from the following description, together with the accompanying drawings, wherein?- Figure 1 is aplan view showing expansion joints in a furnace setting in the corner and the center of therear wall; V

Figure 2 is a plan 'view in greater detail of a cory'ner expansion joint;

' Figure 3 is apartial vertical section through an expansion joint, showing the asbestos rope packing; r 4 1 Figure 4 is an isometric view of apair of special L-shaped tiles;

Figures 5to 9 are plan views of a series of five successive tile or brick courses; a Figure 10 is a partial section through a sequence of six successive courses;

Figure 11 is a partial innerelevation of a furnace setting showing the expansion joint.

Referring more particularly to the drawingsa furnace 10 is shown having rear and side settings 11 and 12,'in which the expansion joints 13, and 14 are locatedin desirable positions. The joint preferably consists of a vertical slot 15 extending from the inner face 16 of the furnace setting into the wall between the special tiles A and B and another-vertical slot 17 off-set from the slot 15 and extending from the unexposed face of the special tiles to the outer face 18 of the furnace setting. The width of the slot 15 depends upon the coefficient of expansion of; the parts of wall and the. temperature to whichv the furnace is to be heated. Inasmuch as the outer section of the setting through which the portion of the slot 17 extends doesnot expand as much as the inner section wherein is situated the portion 15, the portion 1'7 has been packed with a suitable insulating material, as forinstance asbestos rope19. Our type of expansion joint does not necessitate extra labor or expense of that necessitated in an ordinary furnace to repair or replace the'side Walls. This is partly due to the fact that the tiles A and B allow the bricks to be set in regular courses in the conventional manner.

In order better to understand the construction of the inner part 15 of the expansion joint, reference may be had to Figures 5 to 11. Examining the left portion of Figure 10 which is the part adjacent the furnacecompartment and Figure 11 which is an inside elevation of the furnace setting, it may be noted that in the courses numbered 23, 24, 25 and 26 the ends of the tiles are exposed to the heat of the furnace, while in the course 27 the tiles are laid at right angles thereto, thus exposing the long side of the tile.

Examining the outer portion of the wall which is shown at the'right-of Figure 10, it is noted that four courses'of tile are laid with the long side of the tile exposed, while the tile of the fifth course havethe ends exposed. Laying tile in this fashion binds it more firmly, thereby lending strength to the furnace setting; Furthermore, the tile in adjacent courses are staggered; so that in the courses numbered 23, 24, 25and 26 wherein the ends of the tile are exposed, the joints between the tiles in one course are positioned one-half the width of a tile away from similar joints in the adjacent course. The linear distance between these staggered joints, which, as mentioned before, is onehalf the width of a normal tile, we have taken as a unit called D and have designed a pair of tiles having face dimensions multiples of this unit D, which tiles, when properly positioned with their plain faces in juxtaposition and interchangeably positioned in adjacent courses, provide a slot extending through a plurality of courses and which at the same time permit the proper staggering of the tile.

An isometric view of these special tiles A and B is shown in Figure 4 and, with the letter D representing one-half the width of a normal tile, as mentioned heretofore, the length of the tiles A and B is 6 or 1 times the length of a normal tile; the greater width of the tile A is 3D; the smaller width 2D; the cutout portion D x 4D. The greater width of tile B is 4D; the smaller width, 3D and the cut-out portion D x 4D. Thus, it will be seen that both widths of the tile B are greater than the corresponding widths of the tile A by the unit D, and also in the case of both tiles the face dimensions of the projecting portion at the larger end of the tiles are D x 2D.

An idea of the way in which the tiles A and B are laid in the setting, in order to give the staggering effect and produce the joint, may be had by referring to Figure 11 and its sections 5-5, 6-6, 7-7, 8-8, and. 9-9 shown respectively in Figures 5 to 9. Thus Figure 5 shows a plan view of the course 27 (Figure 11). In this course the face tile of the row 28 have their long side exposed, while the tile of the continguous row 29 are positioned at right angles thereto. The tiles A and B have their larger ends exposed, the cut-out portion permitting the staggering of the joints betweenthe tiles in the outer row 28 and those in the row 29. In Figure 6, which is a plan view of the course 26, the tiles of the outer row 30 have their ends exposed, while the tiles in row 31 contiguous thereto are positioned at right angles. In other words the tiles 30 and 31 have their positions reversed with reference to those in rows 28 and 29. In this case the tiles A and B have also been reversed end for end, thus giving the staggering effect between the two rows. The staggering between the tile of the courses 26 and 2? is effected in this case as the tiles in row 30 of course '26 have the same relative position with reference to the joints between the tiles 28 of course 2? as the tiles 29 have to the joints of tiles 28.

Figure '7 is a plan view of the course 25. In this course the rows of tile 32 and 33 are laid similarly to the rows 30 and 31 respectively, so that in this case provision must be made for staggering the tile joints of the courses 26 and 25. This is done by interchanging the positions of the tiles A and B. Thus as the tile B is one unit, namely D greater in width than the tile A, the joints between the tiles in the course 25 will be displaced one-half the width of a tile from the corresponding joints in the course 26 thereby providing the staggering effect. This is best seen in Figure 11.

Figure 8 is a plan view of the course 24. The rows of tile 34: and 35 are laid similarly to the rows of tile 32 and 33 and have the same relative position theretoas the rows 36 and 31 of Figure 6. By positioning the tiles A and B in the same manner as in Figure 6, the tiles in the rows 34 andv 32 of the adjacent courses are staggered.

Figure 9 is a plan view of the course-23. The tiles in the row 3'7 are positioned similarly to the tiles in row 34 in Figure 8, the staggering effect being accomplished by interchanging the position of the tiles A and B with reference to their position in course 24. In the course 23, as shown in Figure 9, the tiles in the contiguous rows 37 and 38 are similarly positioned the staggering therebetween being provided by the projections of the tiles A and B in the manner shown.

A plan view of the course 39 is not shown. but this being the fifty course, the long side of the tile is exposed to the furnace as row 28 in Figure 5, the tiles A and B being positioned, so that the ends having the projection extend toward the furnace compartment. If the tiles A and B, however, in the course 39 were positioned exactly as in the course 2'7, the joints between the tiles in the course 39 would be coincident with every other joint in the course 23. This is obviated by reversing the positions of the tiles A and B with reference to their positions in the course 27. This is best shown in Figure 11.

It is also desirable that the portion of the slot 19 be outof alignment with the portion of the slot 15 and at the same time out of alignment with any of the joints between the'other tiles. 500 This is accomplished by spacing the portions of the slot a distance D. apart as shown.

7 Although we have described ourinvention with reference to a particular arrangement of tile, it is obviousthat many other arrangements are possi- G05 ble within the spirit of the invention and we desire to be limited therefore only by the prior art and the appended claims.

We claim: 7

'1. An expansion joint for a furnace setting 110 which comprises a plurality of tile courses having the tiles therein staggered and a slot in said setting to accommodate for the expansion of said tiles, said slot being formed by a plurality of pairs of tiles, each tile having a plane face and 115 a cut-away face, said planefaces being in juxtaposition spaced suificiently' apart to provide a slot, the tiles in each pair having widths of different multiples of one-half a normal tile width and adapted when interchanged toaccommodate the staggered tiles of the courses.

2. An expansion joint fora furnace setting which comprises aplurality of tile courses having the tiles therein staggered with reference to adjacent courses, some of'said courses comprising tiles at right angles. to each other in adjacent rows and a slot in said setting to accommodate for the expansion of said tiles, said slot formed by a plurality of pairs of; L shaped tiles having the back faces thereof in juxtaposition to form the slot and the front faces thereof adjacent tiles in contiguous rows, each pair being adapted when interchanged to accommodate the staggered tiles of the courses. g e

3. An expansion joint for a furnace setting which comprises a plurality of tile courses, having the tiles therein staggered withreference to the tiles in adjacent courses, said courses comprising contiguous rows of tiles at right angles, a slot in said setting to accommodate for the expansion of said tile, said slot being formed by a plurality of pairs of L shaped tiles having the back faces thereof in juxtaposition to form the slot, and the front faces thereof adjacent tiles in contiguous rows, the tiles of'a pair being of 145 different widths and being adapted by interchanging their relative positions in adjacent courses to accommodate for the staggering of the tiles therein.

4. An expansion joint for a furnace setting 1150 which comprises a wall consisting of a plurality of vertical courses of tile provided with a slot having two off-set portions, one of which extends from the inner face of the furnace setting to a plane intermediate the inner and outer faces of the setting and the other of which extends from said plane to the outer face of the furnace setting, each offset portion of the slot' being defined by different tile units from those defining the other offset portion, said outer portion of the slot having a packing of fire-proofing material.

5. An expansion joint for a furnace setting which comprises a wall consisting of a plurality of vertical courses of tile provided with a slot having two off-set portions, one of which extends from the inner face of the furnace setting to a plane intermediate the inner and outer faces of the setting and the other of which extends from said plane to the outer face of the furnace setting, each offset portion of the slot being defined by different tile units from those defining the other offset portion.

6. A unit pair of tiles for a vertically extending expansion joint in a furnace setting, each having a width equal to a different multiple of one-half the width of a normal tile, each of said tiles also having a projecting portion having facial dimensions equal to a normal tile width in one direction and a half normal tile width in the other direction. I

7. A pair of tiles to be used together in effecting a staggered relation between tiles of different adjacent courses of a wall into which the tiles are built whereby a continuous vertically extending expansion joint is obtained; the tiles of said pair each having adjacent portions of widths equal, respectively, to an odd and an even multiple of the half width of the other tiles to be used therewith in building the wall; the tiles of said pair varying as between them both as to their greater and lesser widths and so that the tiles of said pair will have their widths of odd multiples, the one at its larger and the other at its smaller end.

8. A tile for use in the building of a wall having a plurality of horizontal and vertical courses, said horizontal courses each including one of said tiles together with others of uniform dimensions; said tile having a side face corresponding in dimensions to a side face of the tiles of uniform dimensions and a side face offset from the first by half the width of the tiles of uniform dimensions and having dimensions corresponding to those of the ends of the tiles of uniform dimensions whereby a vertically extending expansion joint is obtained.

9. A furnace setting comprising an inner portion and an outer portion, said inner portion having a plurality of expansion joints forming continuous vertically extending slots, said expansion joints comprising a plurality of pairs of tiles in juxtaposition to form said slots, said outer portion comprising a plurality of wall sections of substantially the same size as said inner sections and overlapping the next adjacent inner section,

and vertical expansion joints between said outer I sections.

10. A furnace setting comprising an inner portion having a plurality of expansion joints, wall sections intermediate the expansion joints, said joints comprising a plurality of pairs of L-shaped tiles in juxtaposition to form a slot, said L-shaped tiles each having a width equal to a different multiple of one-half of the width of a normal tile, an outer portion comprised of wall sections of substantially the same size'as the inner sections having intermediate vertically extending slots and overlapping the next adjacent inner section.

11. A furnace setting comprising an inner portion having a plurality of expansion joints, wall sections intermediate said expansion joints, said joints comprising a plurality of L-shaped tiles in juxtaposition to form a vertical slot, an outer portion comprised of wall sections of substantially the same size as the inner sections having intermediate vertically extending slots and overlapping the next adjacent inner section.

12. A furnace setting comprising an inner portion having a plurality of expansion joints, wall sections intermediate said expansion joints, said expansion joints forming a continuous vertically extending slot, an outer portion comprised of wall sections of substantially thesame size as said inner sections and overlapping the next adjacent inner section, expansion joints between said outer sections, said expansion joints forming a continuous vertically extending slot.

GEORGE ALLEN, JR. FREDRICK C. SIMPSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2833139 *Jul 12, 1955May 6, 1958Durisol A G Fur LeichtbausoffeWall construction
US7141085Jan 16, 2003Nov 28, 2006Texaco Inc.Refractory protected replaceable insert
US7921533Oct 4, 2006Apr 12, 2011Ge Energy (Usa) LlcRefractory protected replaceable insert
USRE32096 *Mar 5, 1984Mar 25, 1986Resco Products, Inc.End block
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/396.1, 52/442, 52/561
International ClassificationF27D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF27D1/004
European ClassificationF27D1/00A6