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Publication numberUS1936327 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1933
Filing dateAug 26, 1929
Priority dateSep 17, 1921
Publication numberUS 1936327 A, US 1936327A, US-A-1936327, US1936327 A, US1936327A
InventorsFischer Albert C
Original AssigneeCarey Philip Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roofing element
US 1936327 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 21, 1933.

A. C. FISCHER ROOFING ELEMENT Original Filed Sept. 17, 1921 Patented Nov. 21, 1933 1,936,327 ROOFING ELEMENT Albert C. Fischer, Chicago, Ill., assignor to The Philip Carey Manufacturing Company, a corporation of Ohio Original application September 17, 1921, Serial Divided and this application August 26, 1929. Serial No. 388,456

11 Claims.

The present invention relates to roofing ele ments which are adapted to be applied to a building structure for the purpose of providing an improved weatherproofing covering, and particularly pertains to roofing strips or slabs having oblique stepped sides in which the exposed stepped portions on one or both sides are separated by intervening recesses or the like to simulate individual shingles and give an ornamental design to the roofing. I

This application is a division of application Serial No. 501,443 filed September 1'7, 1921.

Heretoi'ore roofing strips or slabs have been serrated at intervals on one edge to provide a series of exposed tabs for simulating individual shingles, when the strips or slabs are laid horizontally in overlapping courses. Moreover, these horizontally laid strips or slabs have been arranged in the successive courses so that the tabs of alternate courses break joints with the recessed portions between the tabs oi the immediately underlying course. This manner oi laying the strips in the courses gives a roof cover ing oi irregular design, simulating individual shingles, rather than a uniform ornamental design wherein the tabs and recesses are in vertical alignment.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference will be made to the accompanying drawing, in which,

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a roofing strip embodying the present invention;

Figs. 2, d, 6 and 3 are plan views of modified forms of roofing strips; and

'Figs. 3, 5 and 7 are sections of roofing coverings composed of roofing strips such as are shown in respective Figs. 2, 4 and 6.

Referring now to th. drawing, the novel and improved roofing product is shown in one form in Fig. 1 wherein an oblique strip or slab 2 is cut from a sheet of prepared roofing with s epped edges 3 on the side to be exposed. The stepped portions on one or both sides are further set ofi from the body of the strip by recesses '4 which extend into the body preferably to a distance equal to the length or the exposed tab. The strips, thus formed are laid in successive overlapping courses with the tabs 5 and recesses of each course in vertical alignment with the respective tabs and recesses of the other courses, thereby forming a roof covering of artistic and ornamental appearance as well as preventing any tendency of the tabs to curl. The recesses co-operate to form continuous grooves which accentuatc the division lines between the vertical trated in Fig. 5.

tab rows and give them the appearance of relatively thick elements such astile. The thickness of the tab elements may be further accentuated by cutting the tab endsin arcuate form 6 (Figs 2 and 3).

In Fig. 4 the strip is formed of the same gen .eral construction as above described, but with the tab ends on one side of the strip converged to a point 7 to effect the roofing design illus- In Fig. 6 the tabs are of somewhat different configuration and those on one or both edges may be alternately arranged to vary the design of the roofing covering or uniformly arranged as in Fig. 8 and in the other described modlfica- 7o tions.

While I have shown certain specific embodiments for carrying my invention into efiect, it is apparent that various other designs may be produced without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. A roofing strip comprising an elongated body having a series of individual shingles arranged diagonally in offset relation to provide tabs on the weather exposed edge, and recesses provided in the body to separate the tabs.

2. A roofing strip comprising an elongated body having a series of individual shingles arranged diagonally in offset relation to provide tabs on the weather exposed edge, and means formed in the body of the strip to separate the tabs.

3. A roofing strip having a series of uniformly designed individual shingles arranged diagonally in offset relation to provide tabs on the weather exposed edge, and recesses provided in the body to separate the tabs.

4. A roofing strip having a series of uniformly designed individual shingles arranged diagonally in ofiset relation to provide tabs on the weather exposed edge, and means formed in the body of the strip to separate the tabs.

5. A roofing strip having a series of individual shingles arranged diagonally in offset relation to provide tabs on the weather exposed edge, and means formed in the body coextensive with the length of the tab exposure to separate the tabs.

6. A roof covering composed of strips laid diagonally in overlapping courses, each of the strips 1 comprising individual shingles offset in stepped relation to provide tabs on the exposed edge,.recesses formed in the strip between the tabs, and

the tabs and recesses of successive courses being 7. A roof covering composed of strips laid diagonally in overlapping courses, each of the strips comprising individual shingles of uniform design offset in stepped relation to provide'tabs on the exposed edge, recesses formed in the strip between the tabs, and the tabs and recesses of successive courses being vertically aligned to provide an ornamental design.

8. A roofing strip comprising an elongated body having a series of individual shingles arranged diagonally in off-set relation to provide tabs along opposite edges, and recesses formed in the body to further separate the tabs on one edge of the strip.

9. A roofing strip comprising an elongated body having a series of individual shingles arranged in ofi-set relation to provide tabsalong opposite edges, and means formed on the body to further set off the tabs on one edge of the strip.

10. A roof covering composed of strips laid diagonally in overlapping courses, each of the strips comprising individual shingles offset in stepped relation to provide tabs on the exposed edge, division lines formed in the strips between the tabs, and the tabs and division lines of successive courses being vertically aligned to provide an ornamental design.

11. A roof covering of strips laid diagonally in overlapping courses, each of the strips comprising individual shingles of uniform design offset in stepped relation to provide tabs on the exposed edge, division lines formed in the strip between the tabs, and the tabs and division linesof successive courses being vertically aligned to provide an ornamental design. I

- ALBERT C. FISCHER.

Classifications
U.S. Classification52/555, 52/554, D25/139
International ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26