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Publication numberUS1936746 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1933
Filing dateMar 22, 1930
Priority dateOct 18, 1927
Publication numberUS 1936746 A, US 1936746A, US-A-1936746, US1936746 A, US1936746A
InventorsBaker Nelson M
Original AssigneeAmerican Optical Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eye protector
US 1936746 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 1933. BAKER 1,936,746

EYE PROTECTOR 3 Original Filed Oct. 18, 1927 IN VEN TOR BY flelsm 771. Baker: WWI/2r A! 2270 NEY Patented Nov. 28, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE-f I American Optical Company, Southbridge,

Mass, a voluntary association of Massachusetts 7 Original application October 18, 1927, Serial No. 226,900, new Patent No. 1,807,681, dated June 2, 1931. Divided and this application March 22, 1930. Serial No. 438,204

3 Claims.

This invention relates to eye protectors for goggles, and has particular reference to a goggle adapted for the use of aviators. This application forms a division of my application Serial Number 226,900, filed October 18, 1927, patented June 2, 1931, $1 1,807,681.

The principal object of this invention is to provide means whereby the, amount of ventilation in an eye protector may be varied to suit the condition under which said eye protector is used.

Another object of this invention is to provide an eye protector particularly adapted for aviation and other high speed occupations, by having ventilating means variable according to the velocity of the external air.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved means for fitting such a device to the face of the wearer, whereby the air or wind from the outside will not enter the eyecup, except as provided for ventilation.

Another object of this invention is to provide simple and economical means of accomplishing said reduction or increase of the ventilating air supply to an eye protector.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, and it will be understood that many changes may be made in the details of construction and. arrangement of parts without departing from the spirit of the invention, as expressed in the accompanying claims. I, therefore, do not wish to be limited to the exact details shown and described, as thev preferred forms only have been shown by way of illustration.

Referring to the drawing, Fig. I is a front view of the device in place on the face of the wearer.

Fig. II is a top view of Fig. I.

Fig. III is a cross section on line IIIIII of Fig. II.

Fig. IV is a cross section on line IV--IV of Fig. I11.

Fig. V is an enlarged sectional view of the ventilation opening shown in Fig. III.

Fig. VI is a cross section on line VI-VI of Fig. V.

Fig. VII is a partial cross section on line VII-VII of Fig. III.

Fig. VIII is a view similar to Fig. V, showing one end of the air chamber closed.

Eye protectors for aviators, automobilists, and others engaged in high speed occupations are usually ventilated by a suction device of some nature, which is dependent upon the velocity of the wind and the speed of the machine for its operation. Usually, the wind thus created, is allowed to pass through a specially designed chamber and to draw, as it goes, the warm air from the interior of the eye protector. It will readily be seen from this operation that a device which is quite eflicient at slow speed by giving sulficient ventilation,will invariably give too much at a higher rate of speed. The contrary is, of course, true, and if the ventilation is made for a high rate of speed such as is usual in combat planes, it will be too restricted for use in ordinary transport work. It is the prime object of my invention therefore, to provide a ventilating device for these eye protectors which will vary the flow of air to the interior of the eye protector, according to the speed at which the user is traveling, or the velocity of the wind across his head.

Referring to the drawing wherein similar characters of reference denote corresponding parts throughout the several views, the improved goggle comprises a pair of eyecups l carrying lenses 2. The eyecup 1 comprises an outer rim or ring 3, having a flanged lens seat 4 and an inner ring or rim 5 between which is held the flange 6 of the resilient face contacting member 7. The face contacting ring 7 has the enlarged portion 8 for engagement with the face and this ring is made preferably of soft rubber. The eyecups 1 are secured one to the other, by the bridge 9. In Fig. I it will be noticed that on the nasal side of theeyecup there is a projection 12 of the resilient ring 7, fitting into the nasal socket. It has been found from experience that ordinarily, goggles ofthis type do not fit snugly into the nasal socket or canthus; hence, an open space is left which allows the wind to be driven in through the opening in the eyecup. This defeet is overcome by enlarging the enlarged portion 8 to fit into the nasal canthus, as has been described. This is an important feature of the present invention. It will be understood that the projections 12, being of tough rubber, are very resilient, and fit themselves naturally and easily to noses of various sizes and to contours of the nasal canthus of various shapes. are ventilated through the openings 29 in the rim 3 and 30 in the rim 5 on one side of the eyecup, and by the tubular lug 31 having a tubular sleeve 32 with a plurality of openings 33, aligning with the opening 34. in the rim 3, see Fig. V. The sleeve 32 in Fig. V is open at both ends. In Fig. VIII the sleeve is closed at one end, as shownat 35. The tubular lug 31 is fitted The eyecups with the pin 36 which fits into an elongated slot 37 in the sleeve 32.

By rotating the sleeve 32 in the lug 31, either one or more of the openings 33 may be'thrown into line with the opening 34 in the rim 3, and in this way, the amount of ventilationmaybe regulated. The pin 36 holds the sleeve 32 in the A extreme open and closed positions, and against removal therefrom. The construction andop eration are best shown in Figs. V and A suction is caused by the air rushing through the tube of the lug 31. This draws the air in through the openings 29 and 30 in the rims 3 and 5. In Fig. VIII the air, instead of rushing through the tubular lug 31, rushes over thetop, and past the orifice of the member 32. From the above de scription it will be seen that when the speed'of the plane is reduced, or the velocity of the wind drops, the suction in the ventilation means will correspondingly grow less. The sleeve 32 in the lug 31 may thereupon-be rotated until the desired amount of ventilation is obtained. From the foregoing, it will be readily seen that. I have provided extremely simple and novel means of accomplishing the objects of this invention, particularly in providing means of reducing the suction in an eye protector when increased speed or greater wind velocity necessitates said reduction for the comfort of the wearer.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. In an ophthalmic mounting, an eyecup having orifices on opposite sides thereof, a sleeve bearing adjacent one of the orifices, and a rotatable sleeve in the sleeve bearing and having an orifice aligned with the orifice in the eyecup whereby by rotating the sleeve in the sleeve-bear- .ingthe orifice in the sleeve may be brought to open into the orifice in the eyecup or the orifice in the eyecup may be closed by the non-perforate portions of the sleeve.

2. In an ophthalmic mounting, an eyecup having orifices on opposite sides thereof, a sleeve bearing adjacent one of the orifices, and a rotat able sleeve in the sleeve bearing and having a plurality of orifices aligned with the orifice in the eyecup whereby by rotating the sleeve in the sleeve bearing a selected number or" the orifices in the sleeve may be brought to open into the orifice in the eyecup or the orifice in the eyecup may be closed by the non-perforate portion of the sleeve.

3. In anophthalmic mounting, an eyecup having orifices on opposite sides thereof, bearing means adjacent one of the orifices, movable valve means in the bearing means and having an orifice aligned with the orifice in the eyecup whereby by moving the valve means in the bearing means the orifice in the valve means may be brought to open into the orifice in the eyecupor the orifice in the eyecup may be closed by the non-perforate portion of the valve means. NELSON M. BAKER.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4755040 *Jul 28, 1986Jul 5, 1988Sharp Plastics Mfg. Ltd.Swim goggles
US5191364 *Oct 23, 1990Mar 2, 1993Kopfer Rudolph JProtective eyewear for use in sports and the like
US5428411 *Jan 8, 1993Jun 27, 1995Kopfer; Rudolph J.Protective eyewear device and lens therefor
US6233342Jun 29, 2000May 15, 2001Pan-Optx, Inc.Sunglasses with adjustable ventilation
US6550914Oct 26, 2001Apr 22, 2003Pan-Optx, Inc.Eyewear with filtered ventilation
US6641263Aug 14, 2001Nov 4, 2003Joel William OlneySunglasses with removable sealing member
US7036927Apr 8, 2004May 2, 2006Kopfer Rudolph JFace foam free protective eyewear with inner liner and vent
US7083276Oct 23, 2003Aug 1, 2006Panoptx, Inc.Sunglasses with removable sealing member
US7237891Jul 5, 2005Jul 3, 2007Kbc America, Inc.Eyewear with removable shield
US7278733Feb 10, 2006Oct 9, 2007Panoptx, Inc.Sunglasses with removable sealing member
US7520604Oct 21, 2004Apr 21, 2009Kbc America, Inc.Multi-purpose eyeglasses
WO2002002039A1 *Jun 29, 2001Jan 10, 2002Pan Optx IncSunglasses with adjustable ventilation
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/440, 2/437
International ClassificationA61F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F9/028
European ClassificationA61F9/02V