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Publication numberUS1937219 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1933
Filing dateApr 18, 1932
Priority dateNov 23, 1931
Publication numberUS 1937219 A, US 1937219A, US-A-1937219, US1937219 A, US1937219A
InventorsDriggs Jr Louis L
Original AssigneeInternat Flare Signal Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flare supporting and firing device
US 1937219 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 1933.

L. L. DRIGGS, ,JR 1,937,219 FLARE SUPPORTING AND FIRING DEVICE Original Filed Nov. 25, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR Louis 1:. nmess rn,

ATTORNEYS Nov. 28, 1933. 1.. DRIGGS, JR 1,937,219

' FLARE SUPPORTING AND FIRING DEVICE Original Filed Nov'. 23. 1931 Z SheetS-Sheet 2 I J 2 w i 7K I i g 1 I f M. N l

v A a xi 2. k

. WJ a u N LOUIS z.pR1ess,J;-.,y I 1- J 7 ATTORNEY:

Patented Nov. 28, 19 33 r ori'ioa 1,937,219 FLARE SUPPORTING AND FIRING DEVICE Louis L. Driggs, Jr., Tippecanoe City, Ohio, as-

signor to International Tippecanoe City,

Flare-Signal Company,

Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Original application November 23, 1931, Serial 576,667. Divided and this application April 18, 1932. Serial No. 605,844

20 Claims. (01. 102-24) This invention relates to improvements in means for supporting and firing flares, and has for its object to provide a flare, the firing of which may be electrically controlled from a switch which permits of remote control for the discharge of the flare.

It is also an object of this invention to provide means for controlling an electric circuit to prevent accidental discharge of the flare, and means cooperating therewith for discharging a plurality of flares as a unit or successively.

It is a further object of this invention to pro vide means for supporting and discharging, and for controlling the discharge of pyrotechnic flares from airplanes, and similar means of conveyance.

These and other objects will appear from the following description taken in the drawings.

This'application is a division of copending application Ser. No. 576,667, filed November 23, 1931.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure '1 is a cross section through the fuselage of an airplane, showing one of the wings in ele- 'vation'and the location of the control mechanism, batteries, flares and switchboard for discharging the flares.

Figure 2 is a diagrammatic view of the control system for firing six flares andof the six flares and their holders connected to a battery, with the parts in firing positions.

Figure 3 is a similar view, with the parts in nonflring or inoperative positions.

Figure 4 is a side elevation of the upper end of one of the flares. I

Figure 5 is a vertical, longitudinal section through the upper end of one of the flares. Figure 6 is a side elevation of the upper end of one of the flares and its holder.

Figure 7 is a rear elevation of the upper end of one of the flares, showing the back of the holder. a

Figure 8 is a top plan view of one of the flares. Figure 9 is a vertical section through the firing plug and its supporting structure, forming part of the upper end of the flare.

Figurelo is a section on the line 10-10 of Figure 2.

.Figure 11 is a section through the flare fuse.

It is to be understood that the flares may be fired in any direction, vertically, upwardly,

downwardly or laterally. But by way of illustration the flares are shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3 in a position to be discharged vertically.

Each flare consists of a cylindrical metal conconnection with tamer 1, which is permanently supported within a supporting bracket having side plates2, a rear plate 3, and a top plate 4, and each flare is supported by means of bolts 5 and nuts 6. The top of each bracket has'an aperture 7 therein for receiving the crown piece, later to be described. Each bracket has reenforcing flanges 8. 9 and 10, clearly shown in Figures 6, 7 and 8.

Projecting through the aperture 7 is a crown piece 11, which is in the shape of an inverted cone and forms the upper end of the metal container. 1. Interposed between this crown piece 11 and the bottom of the top plate 4 is a rubber ring 12, which acts as a shock absorber when the flare is discharged by firing. The upper end 50f the crown piece is-formed into a vertical cylindrical collar 13, which is internally threaded to receive a cylindrical firing plug 14, which has in its upper end a retracted opening 15 through which a binding post 16 extends.

0n the lower end of this binding post and insulating it from the adjacent parts of the firing plug is a washer 17, while on the upper end thereof is an insulating washer 18. By means of these washers the binding post is securely insulated from the firing plug. Attached to one end of the binding post is a wire 20, while to the other end there is attacheda wire 19, which has at its free end a loop of fine wire 21 that becomes incandescent when the current is placed -on the line in order to ignite powder 22, lo-

cated in a cylinder '23. The cylinder 23 with the powder 22 therein is embedded in powder 24 inclosed within the firing plug 14 by means of a a cardboard disc 25.

The crown piece 11 together with a gas check disc 28'f0rms a firing chamber 26, into which one end of a fuse 27'projects. This fuse extends through an opening or hole provided therefore in the gas check disc 28, of felt or other suitable material.-

Inside of the container 1 is a projectile casing 29, which has in .its upper closed end an annular wooden block 30 which forms a cent'ralcavity that contains a cup 31 inclosing the lower end which is made 9 of. the fuse 2'7, and which contains powder 32 in which the fuse is embedded. Below the annular block is a layer of powder 33, below which is the flare material 34 filling'all of a pasteboard' carton 35 located within the projectile casing, and supporting a parachute suitably attached to its lower end. In Figure 1 there is shown in section part of the fuselage 36 of an airplane, with an instrument board 37 therein, with one wing 38 extend- 1 ing from one side thereof. The numeral 39 indicates a flare casing, supported in a wing of an airplane. As shown in Figure 2, the numeral 40 is-used to indicate a ground wire extending from the flare casing 39 to a ground 41, which is any suitable part of the airplane.

In this Figure 2 the different flares are indicated bythe letters A, B, C, D, E and F. The flare A is connected by a wire 42 to a terminal '79 of a switch 43. The flare B is connected by means of a wire 44 to a terminal '79 of a switch 45. The flare C is connected by awire 46 to a switch 47. The flare D is connected by means of a wire 48 to a switch 49 while the flare E is connected by means of a wire 50 to a switch 51. Each of these wires 42, 44, 46, 48 and 50 is similar to wires 20, found in connection with the flare F and connecting this flare to a switch 52.

The numeral 53 is used to designate a source of current, such as'a battery, and has extending from one side thereof a wire 54, which through wire 55, is grounded at 56 to some suitable part of the airplane frame. This wire 55 also has a branch extending to a dash light 5'7. This light is also connected by means of a. wire 58 to the terminal 59 of a master switch 60.

This wire 58 is connected by wires 61, 62, 63 and 64 respectively to the switches 4'7, 49, 51 and 52, which have switch arms 65, 66, 6'7 and 68. From the other side of thebattery from a terminal 69 extends a wire '70, to a terminal '71 in the master switch opposite the terminal 59. The switch plate of this master switch is indicated by the numeral '72 and'is operated by means of a handle or switch lever '73.

The numeral '74 is used to designate a bar, suitably supported and extending from the switch lever or handle '73 to which it is operatively connected. In this bar is a plurality of notches for receiving the switch arms 65, 66, 6'7 and 68. The handle for operating the switch 43 is shown in Figure 10, and is indicated by the numeral '76. This handle operates a switch plate '77 adapted to contact with the terminals '78 and 79, to which wires and 42 are attached. The two terminals '78 and the terminal 59 are connected by the wires 80. For the purpose of holding this plate '77 in operating position there is provided a spring 31, which is adapted to force the plate into a transverse groove 82. In order to-adjust .the switch the handle '76 is operated to withdraw the plate,7'7 from the groove 82 so that it may be rotated into contact with the contact members.

The switch structure shown in Figure 10 illustrates the switches 43 and 45. By the operation of the handle '73 the bar 74 may be shifted to any one of two positions, as shown in Figures 2 and 3. When this bar '74 is in the position shown in Figure 3 the switch arms 65, 66, 6'7 and 68cannot be operated for switching purposes. Therefore at this time the flares connected to these switches cannot be discharged, and in order to operate these switches .the bar has to be swung to the position shown in Figure 2, at which time the master switch forms a connection between the contacts 59 and '71 and the switch arms 65-, 66, 6'7 and 68 may be moved into the notches '75 for closing circuits through the switches 4'7, 49, 51 and 52.

In order that the flares connected to the switches 43 and 45 may be discharged these switches must be thrown into the position shown in Figure 2. With the parts in the position shown in Figure 3 none of the flares can be discharged without operation of the switches. In order that the flares C, D and F connected to switches 65, 66, 6'7 and 68 may be discharged the handle '73 must be shifted from an off position, as shown in Figure 3, to an on position, as shown in Figure 2, and in order to discharge flares A and B switches 43 and 45 must be moved to theposition shown in Figure 2. Switches 43 and 45 act independent of switch 60 but can only form complete circuits when the switch 60 is in On position. Each switch 65, 66, 6'7 and 68 can be operated independently when the handle '73 is in on position, but cannot be operated at all when it is in off position.

In order that any flare may be discharged the switch 60 must be in On" position, as shown in Figure 2. When the switch 66 is in the position shown in Figure 2 a circuit is formed from the terminal 69 of the battery to the switches 43 and 45 so that when the switches 43 and 45 are closed a circuit is formed through these switches to the flares A and B.

If switches 43 and 45 are closed the closing of switch 60 will cause a simultaneous discharge of flares A and B. However, if switches 43 and 45 are open the closing of switch 60 will have no effect on these flares A and B. After switch 60 is closed the switch arms 65, 66, 6'7 and 68 may be moved to form electric circuits from the terminal 69 to the flares C, D, E and I desire to comprehend within my invention such modifications as may be embraced within my claims and the scope of my invention.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patcut, is:

' 1. In combination, means for supporting a plurality of flares, a plurality of switches connected on one side to each of said flares, means for grounding said flares, a source of current, a master switch in circuit therewith and with the other sides of said independent switches, whereby upon the closing of the master switch current is made available to the circuits of all flares and upon closing the independent switches each flare can be flred, and a common means on said master switch for locking each of the independent flare switches simultaneously.

2. In combination, means to support a flare, means to ground said supporting means to electrically fire aflare, a switch connected to a source of current, a wire from said switch to the flare, an electric switch for controlling the application of the source of current, and means in the firstmentioned switch whereby it is necessary to first move said switch meansoutwardly and then rotatively before closing the circuit to fire the flare.

3. In a flare support, a bracket having side plates, a rear plate and a top plate having a hole therein, a flare having a crown piece projecting through the hole, and means'for attaching the flare to the top plate.

4. Ina flare support, a bracket having side plates, a rear plate and a top plate having a hole therein, a flare having a crown piece projecting through the hole, means for attaching the flare to the top plate, and a rubber block around the crown piece and between the crown piece and the top plate.

5. In a flare support, a bracket having a hole therein, a cylindrical container having a coneshaped crown piece projecting through the hole, means to hold the container on the bracket, and a resilient washer around the crown piece and between the crown piece and the bracket.

6. In a flare support, a bracket having a hole therein, a container having a cone-shaped projection thereon extending through the hole, a. pad between the projection and the bracket, and a firing plug in the projection.

7. In a flare support, a bracket having a hole therein, a container having a cone-shaped crown piece terminating in a cylindrical collar projecting through the hole, a yielding member between the bracket and the crown piece, and a, firing plug threaded into the collar.

8. In a flare support, a bracket having a hole therein, a container having a cone-shaped crown piece terminating in a cylindrical collar projecting through the hole, a yielding member between the bracket and the crown piece, and a firing plug threaded into the collar, said plug having powder therein and means to fire the powder.

9. In a flare support, a bracket having a hole therein, a container having a cone-shaped end projecting through the hole, means to yieldingly hold the container on the bracket, a firing plug supported in the projection, a cylinder having powder therein in the plug, powder in the plug around the cylinder, and means to fire the powder in the cylinder.

10. In a flare support, a bracket having a hole therein, a container having a cone-shaped crown piece projecting through the hole, a firing plug having powder therein supported in the crown piece, one end of said crown piece being closed with a conductor therein, a cardboard disc closing the other-end, and means to cause the conductor to become incandescent whereby the powder explodes.

11. In a flare support, a cylindrical container having at one end a cone-shaped crown piece, means to yieldingly support the container, a firing plug in the crown piece, a flare carton in the container, a flare material in the carton, a fuse extending from. the carton into the crown piece, said plug having powder therein, and means to fire the powder.

12. In a flare support, a bracket having side plates, a back plate, a top plate having thereon reenforcing flanges, and a flare container supported by the top plate adjacent the side plates V and the back plate.

13. In a flare supporting and firing device,

the crown.

, 3 a plurality of brackets, a container supported by each bracket, an explosive in each container, and

' means to fire the explosive, said means including a master switch having a locking-bar attached thereto and a plurality of other switches adapted to be locked against action by the locking bar.

14. In a flare, a casing, a firing plug in the casing, a bracket for supporting the casing, and, a yielding connection between the bracket and the casing.

15. In a flare, a bracket having a top plate with an aperture therein and side plates, a casing supported by the side plates and having a crown projecting into the aperture, and a yielding member around the crown and between the top plate and the casing.

16. In a flare, a bracket having a top plate with an aperture thereinand side plates, a casing supported by the side plates and having a crown projecting into the aperture, a yielding member around the crown and between the top plate and the casing, and a detachable-firing ported by the supporting members and having a.

crown projecting into the aperture, and a rubber ring around the'crown between the top plate and the casing. y

18. In a flare, a bracket having a top plate with an. aperture therein and supporting members on opposite sides of the aperture, a casing supported by the supporting members and having a. crown projecting into the aperture, a rubber ring around the crown between the top plate and the casing, and a detachable firing plug in 19. In a flare, a bracket having a top plate with an aperture therein and supporting members on opposite sides of the aperture, a casing supported by the supporting members and having a crown projecting into the aperture, a rubber ring around the crown between the top plate and the casing, a

' detachable firing plug in the crown, and an elecside plates, and yielding means between the casing and the top plate.

- LOUIS L. DRIGGS, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2682770 *Apr 11, 1949Jul 6, 1954Greyhound CorpMeans for testing the efficiency of vehicle brakes
US2956478 *Aug 21, 1957Oct 18, 1960Ream Jr Joseph TRubber shear mount
US3055269 *Jul 5, 1960Sep 25, 1962Benruth Engineering And Mfg CoAutomobile warning device
US3181822 *Nov 13, 1963May 4, 1965Foote Kenneth R"wheels-up" flare warning system
US3353446 *Jan 28, 1966Nov 21, 1967Goodyear Aerospace CorpExpulsion apparatus
US4158323 *Jan 27, 1978Jun 19, 1979The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyTraining flare dispensing system
US4934273 *Jun 20, 1989Jun 19, 1990Spectra Diode Laboratories, Inc.Laser flare
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/1.51, 244/1.00R, 102/338, 89/35.1
International ClassificationF41A19/69, F41A19/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A19/69
European ClassificationF41A19/69