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Publication numberUS1937220 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1933
Filing dateMay 25, 1932
Priority dateMay 25, 1932
Publication numberUS 1937220 A, US 1937220A, US-A-1937220, US1937220 A, US1937220A
InventorsDriggs Jr Louis L
Original AssigneeDriggs Jr Louis L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flare signal
US 1937220 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 1933. L. 1.. muses, JR

FLARE S IGNAL Filed May 2.5, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet l \\J-F m i J 3 m fiuuuhnhmw wnwmn m H H mm RD E5 H W A o Patented Nov. 28, 1933 I UNITED STATES PATENT oer cs FLARE SIGNAL Louis L. Briggs, In, Tippecanoe City, Ohio Application May 25, 1932. Serial No. 613,375

, 16 Claims. (Cl. 102-24) This invention relates to improvements in flare Figure 3 is a vertical longitudinal section signals, and particularly to improvements over through the cartridge case with the charge, the the flare signal described and claimed in appliflare material and the parachute inclosed within cation Ser. No. 576,667, flled November 23, 1931. the cartridge case.

This invention has for its object to provide a Figure 4 is a section on the line 44 of Fig- 60 plurality of flare casings, and means for supporture 2. ingthese casings so they may be fired from a Figure 5 is an enlarged view of the lower end single point remote from the casings, such as by of the flare casing showing the lower end of the electric firing. cartridge case in section.

It is an object of this invention to provide Figure 6 is a side elevation of the frame for 65 means for connecting the flare casings so they supporting the flare, with the flare shown theremay be easily removed and may be securely held in. I when in position. This means consists of a rec- Figure 7 is a fragmentary view showing one side tangular frame having a part to receive one end of the container and the container support takof each of a plurality of casings, together with en on the line 7-7 of Figure 8. 70

means for receiving the other end of these cas- Figure 8 is a vertical section through the upings and gripping this end so that the casings are per end of the container and the adjacent part securely held in position against removal and of the frame for supporting the container. displacement. In Figure l the various flares, three in num It is a further object of this invention to proher, are shown to be supported by means of a 75 vide a flare casing which has at one end a rolled casing, rectangular in shape, having a base memneck structure providing amouth, which is easily her 1, side members 2 and a top 3. The base and readily inserted into a suitable opening in member has a plurality of holes, not shown, for

the support, and which also serves as a recepreceiving the neck or mouth end of the flare castacle or container for the expelling charge. ing. The top has an equal number of larger holes 80 It is also an object of this invention to proto receive the other ends of the flare casings.

vide an especially formed cartridge case for 2. These ends of the casings project into sleeves 4 fuse therein for igniting the charge, and a flare located in the holes in the top.

material adapted to be inserted into the casing. Each sleeve has a flange 5, which serves to en- There is also provided, in connection with the gage the top and support the sleeve from down- 85 I cartridge case, means for supporting a paraward movement therein. The lower'reduced end chute and means for properly positioning the 6 of each sleeve has a plurality of slits 6a, which parachute when supported, and holding the parts make it possible for this end to be brought into thereof in adjusted spaced relationship. For clamping engagement with the flare casing by this purpose there is provided a plurality of means of aclamp 7, which fits around this slit end 90 thrust members which prevent the parachute of the sleeve. The reduced end of the sleeve from becoming compressed to insure its opencontacts directly with the outer wall or periphing, and to facilitate its loading in the case in cry of the flare casing or container 8, while the the container provided therefor. enlarged upper part of the sleeve provides space 40 It is my object to provide a common source of for the seating of a cap located on the upper end 95 electricity, suchas a battery, a plurality of lines of the flare casing. For properly supporting the to the individual flares to be fired, and indecontainer within the sleeve there is provided on pendent switches for each line with independent the upper end of the container a bead 8a, which locks therefor. engages a rubber ring 8b resting on the reduced These and other advantages will appear from end 6 of the sleeve for supporting, in a resil- 109 the following description taken in connectionient manner, the container in the sleeve. with the drawings. One end of the container or flare casing is-re-" Referring to the drawings: duced in size, and has a neck 9 between the body Figure 1 is a view showing the complete layof the casing or container and a mouth 10 locatout of the flare structure, together with the wired beyond the neck from the body. The mouth ing and the switchboard usedin connection part is cylindrical in shape, and provides a houstherewith. ing for containing the expelling charge. The end Figure 2 is a vertical longitudinal section of the mouth is turned in and forms a somewhat through the flare casing showing therein the reduced hole 11. Located on the inside of the 55 cartridge case in position for firing. mouth is a cup 12, which rests upon the turned-in electric conductor is attached for grounding pur-- poses. The bottom of the cup and the plate 16 have holes therein in which there is an insulating ring 19. Resting upon the plate 16 and the insulating ring 19 is an insulating disc 18, while below the bottom of the cup there is a second insulating disc 20. These discs and ring are held together by means of a copper bolt 21, which has its head resting upon the insulating disc 18.- Cooperating with the head for clamping the insulating discs and the insulating ring are two nuts 22. These nuts not only serve to hold the bolt in position on the mouth of the container, but they serve as a clamp for clamping the end of a wire conductor 23.

Within the inclosure formed by the cup 12 and the hard paper disc 14 is powder 24 adapted to be ignited for expelling purposes. Embedded in this powder is a cylinder 25, which also has powder 26 therein. In the powder 26 within the cylinder 25 is a fine wire 2'7, which is caused to glow by the passing of an electric current therethrough. To one end of this fine wire is attached one end of a conducting wire 29, which leads to the upturned end of the plate 16 for grounding purposes. The other end of this fine'wire is connected by means of a wire 28 to the head of the bolt 21.

The other end of the cartridge case or container is closed by means of a cap 30, which is adapted to rest in the enlarged part of the sleeve in the top of the supporting frame. Within each container or flare casing is a cartridge case 31, shown in section in Figure 3. Adjacent one end of this cartridge case is an inwardly directed head 32, which serves as a shoulder for limiting the inward movement of an annular cup member 33. The end of the cartridge case adjacent the bead is spun over, as at 34, to engage the periphery of the outer wall of the annular cup, as clearly shown in Figure 5. Within the annular cup there is a cup 35, which has around its periphery at the closed end thereof, a flange 36 engaged and supported by means of the turned-over or spun end 37 of the inside wall of the annular cup. This cup has a seat thereon similar to the cup 12, which supports a disc 36 heid in position on the seat or shoulder by a turned-over edge 39. Extending into the bottom of the cup is a fuse tube 40, closed at one end 41, with laterally extending holes 42 therein adjacent the closed end. The end of the cartridge case Justdescribed rests upon a thick, heavy circular metal disc 43, which has a hole in the center thereof to receive the fuse tube 40. On this fuse tube is a shoulder 44, which prevents the disc from leaving the adjacent part of the cartridge case.

Adjacent the disc 43 and around the fuse tube is a relatively thick felt disc 45, held in position by means of a second thinner metal disc 46, also having a hole through which the fuse tube passes. The lower end of the fuse tube is open, and has lateral holes therein. Located above the annular cup is a second felt disc 47, which has in the center thereof a hole 46 directly above, the cardboard disc38.

Fitting within the cartridge case is a cylindriable material. This carton is cylindrical in shape, and has its lower end closed by means of a metallic cap 50, with a hole 51 in the center in line with the hole 48. This carton rests on top of the felt disc 47, and has in its bottom a layer of powder 52.

Above the layer of powder 52 and filling the carton, is flare material 53. The upper end of this carton is closed by means of a disc 54. The cup 35 andthe fuse tube have therein powder 55. Attached to the disc 54 is one end of a wire 55a. To the other end of this wire is attachedone end of each of a plurality of strings 56,.which have their other ends attached to a parachute 57.

This parachute and the strings are properly folded and placed within the cartridge case above the carton containing the flare material. The wire is coiled above the disc 54 and passes between the side of the cartridge case and a felt packing 58 located immediately above the carton containing the flare material.

Immediately above and below the packing 58 is a thin disc 59 of some suitable material. The upper disc supports within the'cartridge a tube 60, which forms a casing for the folded parachute. In the upper end of the cartridge case and resting on the upper end of the tube 60 is a packing 61. This tube 60 with the packing 61 and one of the discs 59 form a casing or housing in which the folded parachute is contained before it is discharged, and when in position to be discharged.

Within the tube 60 and between the packing 61 and ihe upper disc 59 is a plurality of flat spacers or thrust members 62, about which the parachute is coiled for support within the tube. These strips of suitable material prevent the parachute from becoming compressed and hold the parts in proper position so that when the fiare is discharged the parachute will properly open without interference.

The numeral 63 indicates a battery for supplying an electric current for discharging the charge of powder within the mouth of each container. From one end of this battery a ground wire 64 extends. From the other end a lead 65 extends to a binding post 67 of a switch case 66. From this post 67 wires lead to a plurality of contacts, one for each of a plurality of switches. Each switch is opened or closed by means of a lever 68, 68a or 68?). By operating the lever 68 contact is so made that a current will flow from the battery, through a wire 70 attached at one end to a binding post '71. This wire is connected at its other end to one of the wires 23, attached to the copper bolt ofone of the flare casings.

For locking the lever 68 in position so that it cannot be operated for making contact and closing the circuit, there is provided a lock member 69. When the switch lever is in off position, as shown in Figure '1 and the lock is in the vertical position, the switch cannot be moved for making contact, and cannot be moved until the lock is moved from the vertical position, or from one. end of a slot 69a to the other end.

, The switch lever 68a is operated to make contact so that the current will flow from the battery, through a wire 70a attached at one end to a binding. post 71a. The other end of this wire unites with one of the wires 23.

The switch lever 68b is operated to form an electrical connection between the battery 63 and the wire 70b connected at one end to a binding postflb. The other 'end of this wire 70b is connected to one of the wires 23.

position, as shown in Figure 1, the switch levers cannot be moved. When they are moved to the right-hand end of the slot 690 the switch levers may be moved for contacting purposes so that each of the flares may be discharged. The current passing through the wires 70, 70a and 70b causes the small wire to glow and discharge the powder around it.

It will be further understood that the tube 60 may be split at 72 so that it will readily fall apart and free the parachute when the appropriate time comes for the parachute to open.

It will be further understood that I desire to comprehend within my invention such modifications as come within the scope of my claims and my invention.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

e 1. In a flare support, a frame having a lower member having holes therein to receive the flring ends of flares and an upper member having holes therein to receive the discharge ends of flares, and means in the holes of one member to grip and support the flares.

2. In a flare support, a frame having a lower member having holes therein to receive the flring ends of flares and an upper member having holes therein to receive the discharge ends of flares, and means on one member to grip and support the flares, said means consisting of sleeves supported by the frame and engaging the flares.

3. In a flare support, a sleeve having a large end and a smaller slitted end adapted to. receive one end of a flare and support the flare, a flange and a cylindrical mouth somewhat larger than the neck, a cup in the mouth for containing an explosive, and electrical means for firing the explosive.

6. In a flare, a container consisting of a metal cylinder having one end reduced to form a neck and a cylindrical mouth somewhat larger than the neck, a cup in the mouth for containing an explosure, a copper insulated binder post bolt acting to hold the cup in the mouth, and a wire in the cup connected atone end to the bolt and at the other end to a ground.

'7. In a flare, a container consisting of a metal cylinder having one end reduced to form a neck and a cylindrical mouth somewhat larger than the neck, a cup in the mouth, said cup having a shoulder around its rim, a disc on the shoulder held in place by the turned-over end of the cup, an explosive in the cup, and electric means for firing the explosive.

8. In a flare, a container consisting of a metal cylinder having one end reduced to form a neck and a cylindrical mouth somewhat larger than the neck, a-cup in the mouth, acopper insulated binder post bolt serving to hold the cup in the month, a glow wire in the cup connected atone end to the bolt and grounded at the other end, an explosive in the cup around the wire, a disc for closing the cup, and a cartridge in the 'container supported on the reducedend thereof and having a fuse adjacent the cup.

9. In a flare, a container consisting of a metal cylinder having one end reduced to form a neck and a cylindrical mouth somewhat larger than the neck, a cup in the mouth, a copper insulated binder post'bolt serving to hold the cup in the mouth, a glow wire in the cup connected at one end to the bolt and grounded at the other end, an explosive in the cup around the wire, a disc for closing the cup, and a cartridge in the container supported on the reduced end thereof and having a fuse adjacent .the cup, said cartridge being supported in the container by means of a pair of discs and an intermediate layer of felt through which the fuse extends.

10. In a flare, a cartridge consisting of a case having at one end a carton containing a flare material, at the other end a tube, said tube being closed at one end by a disc adjacent the carton and closed at the other end by a felt pad in the case, a parachute in the tube, and a plurality of small plates between the disc and the pad with the parachute folded about them.

11. In a flare, a container for a parachute consisting of a tube closed at one end by a disc and at the other end by a felt pad, a plurality of spacer plates in the tube between the disc and the pad, and a parachute in the tube folded back and forth about the plates. I

r 12. In combination, a rack comprising a frame having end members with apertures of different sizes in the respective end members, a flare-supporting tube having a restricted head fltted in the smaller of said apertures, the other end of which is fitted in the larger of said apertures, said tube being longer than the distance between the end members having the apertures, and detachable clamping means mounted adjacent the larger aperture for detachably clamping said tube in position to prevent its making its exit from said rack.

13. In combination, a rack comprising a frame having end members with apertures of difierent sizes in the respective end members, a flare-supporting tube having a restricted head fltted in the smaller of said apertures,'the other end of which is fitted in the larger of said apertures, said tube being longer than the distance between the end members having the apertures, detachable clamping means mounted adjacent the larger aperture for detachably clamping said tube in position to prevent its making its exit from said rack, a flare casing mounted in said tube adapted to be expelled therefrom, and means for sealing said flare in said tube.

14;. In combination, a rack comprising a frame having end members with apertures of diiferent sizes in the respective end members, a flare-supporting tube having a restricted head fitted in the smaller of said apertures, the other end of which is fitted in the larger of said apertures, said tube being longer than the distance between the end members having the apertures, detachable clamping means mounted adjacent the larger aperture for detachably clamping said tube in position to prevent its making its exit from said rack, a flare strlcted end 01' said tube adapted said flare.

15. In combination, a plurality o1 v iflaresi, a plurality of tubes, one for each flare, a plurality of at will we expel 5 electric circuits, one connected to each tube, an

expelling charge fired thereby in eachtube, a common source of electrical energy, and independent Lows L; mums, .m.

tie

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2606495 *Sep 30, 1947Aug 12, 1952Kilgore IncPyrotechnic device
US2717533 *Jun 7, 1951Sep 13, 1955Wells Willis LPhotoflash cartridge ejectors
US3336870 *Sep 17, 1965Aug 22, 1967Gunyan Robert BRemotely controlled flare firing device and method
US4130060 *Dec 8, 1976Dec 19, 1978Pains - Wessex LimitedPyrotechnic devices
US4158323 *Jan 27, 1978Jun 19, 1979The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyTraining flare dispensing system
US4934273 *Jun 20, 1989Jun 19, 1990Spectra Diode Laboratories, Inc.Laser flare
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/1.51, 102/338
International ClassificationF42B4/28, F42B4/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B4/28
European ClassificationF42B4/28