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Publication numberUS1940701 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1933
Filing dateJan 26, 1932
Priority dateJan 26, 1932
Publication numberUS 1940701 A, US 1940701A, US-A-1940701, US1940701 A, US1940701A
InventorsShope Thomas H
Original AssigneeShope Thomas H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air service hose rack
US 1940701 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 26, 1933. T, H. SHOPE AIR SERVICE HOSE RACK Filed Jan. 26, 1932 Patented Dec. 26, 1933 PATENT YoFFICE 1,940,701 AIR SERVICE Hos RACK Thomas H. Shope, South Gate, Calif.

A plication January 26,

1932. sci-s1 No. 589,006

My invention relates to an air service hose rack and has for its principal object, the provision of a relatively simple, practical and inexpensive rack that maybe conveniently employed in automobile 5 servicestations, garages and the like-forsup porting and manipulating the compressed air supply hose that is utilized for inflating pneumatic tires. Y V

Further objectsof my'invention are, to generally improve upon and simplify the construction of the existing forms of airv service hose racks and. reels, to provide a hose supporting rack or reel that is mounted so that itmay be conveniently swung througha horizontalarc of approximately 180 in order to enable the valve that is carried by the free end of the hose to be conveniently manipulated during the tire inflation operations, andfurther, to construct the rack or reel so that the supported .hosemay be readily withdrawn to enable the tire filling valve to beapplied to the filling nipples or stemsof tires and which rack or reel will act-automaticallyafter the tire filling operations, to rewind the-withdrawn portion of the hose upon the swinging rack or reel. a

With, the foregoing and my invention consistsin certain novel featuresof construction and arrangement of parts that will hereinafter be more fully described and claimed 1 andillustrated in the accompanying drawing in which: l A Fig. l is a side elevational view of an air service hose rack' constructed-inaccordance with my invention. l

Fig. 2 is-a horizontal section taken approxi- ..Inately-on the line 2-'2 of Fig. 1. V r Fig. 3 is a horizontal section taken through on of the hose supportingpulleys utilizedin my improved rack. l 40 Figdiisan elevational view of thejhose supporting. pulleys-that are positioned at, the upper endofthe rack. r Fig. 5 is an enlarged vertical section taken approximatelyon' the line 5.-5'of Fig. 2.

'Referringliby numerals to the accompanying drawing which illustrates .a practical embodiment of my invention, l0, l0 designate bracketsthat are secured in any suitable manner, one ldirectly above the: other, to a-suitable' support,rfor-instance, the face of a building wall orapostw and journaled for rotation irr said brackets are the vertically disposed pintles 11,-0f short horizontally disposed armsQl2 and the latter being formed integral with or fixedto anupright bar or rod 13. The bearings :in the brackets 10 are slightly longer than the pintles 11, in orderto provide chambers below said pintles and which chambers are filled with grease, thereby lubricating thepintles during their rotary movement. I 1

Thus where the brackets 10 are-secured to the face of a building wall or the like the rack or reel may be swung-laterally or from one side to another throughout an: arc of-approximately 180 I so that said rack'while not in use, may occupy anout-of-the-way position directly adjacent to the face of the building wall. 2 The upperend of rod or bar 13 is bent outward- ;ly and downwardly, and secured thereto is a substantiallyinverted U-shaped bracket 14.

, Passing through the lower portions of i the ver- 79 ticallegs of the bracket 14 and through the lower end of thedownwardly. bent upper end portion of rod 13, is apinor bolt 15 thatserves as .an axis for a pairhof hose supporting pulleys 16 that are 'disposed between the end of the bar 13 4'5" and the vertical legs of bracket 14. a

Each pulley illustrated in detail in Fig. 3 comprises a hub portion17 having discs 17 formed integral with its end portions and extending l p g through the hub is 'a'bushing 18 providedwith a -80 other objects injview,

grease receiving chamber 19 and interposed between thisbushing and the hub are antifriction bearings 20. v 1

Chamber 19 is packed with grease in order to effectivelylubricate' the anti-friction bearings of the pulley during its rotation on the axle '15.

During operation grease. will gradually seep iromchamber 19 outwardly through theends of bushing 18 around pin or bolt 15 and this grease willseep or .flow radiallyoutward so as to lubri- '90 .cate the bearings 20'.

. Ar-range'd between the outer portions of the discs 17 andmjounted to rotateireely upon pins 21 having their ends seated in said discs, are small grooved pu1leys122'that provide a rolling support l i "for the air hose. V r By mounting the hosefsupporting pulleys 22 so as to freely rotate between the discs 17 and mounting the hubs 16 so as to freely rotate on the axles l5, the'friction between the supported hose 1 and the pulleys is reduced to a. minimum andsaid hose will ride 'onto and. from the pulleys with l very little, if any, resistance.

The lower end of bar or rod 13.:below the lower ar1n-l2, is bent at: right angles to "form ashort horizontally disposed arm 23 and the inner ends of a pair of spaced parallel bars 24 are hinged or pivotallyconnected to the end of said arm 23 by :a horizontally disposed pin or bolt 25.

1 A horizontally disposedpin or bolt 26fpasses i portion of frame 28, is a relatively small pulley through the outer ends of the spaced bars 24 and mounted thereupon between said bars is a hose supporting pulley 27, the construction of which is practically identical with the construction of the hose supporting pulley heretofore described and illustrated in Fig. 3.

Secured to the side of the outer ends of the spaced bars 24, is a short horizontally disposed U- shaped frame 28, through which the pin or bolt 26 passes and mounted on said pin or bolt within said frame, is a hose supporting pulley 29.

Journaled on a transverse pin in the front 30. This small pulley is positioned immediately in front of pulley 39, and the end porton of the hose H that carries the valve that is applied to the tire valve stems passes downwardly between the pulleys 29 and 30.

Adjustably mounted on the lower portionofrod 13, in a clamping bracket 31 and pivotally connected to the forward end thereof, is the upper end "of an inclined rod 32. This rod is arranged to-slide freely'through a swivel block 33'that is positioned between the bars 24 and which has trunnions 34 that pass through suitably formed openings in said bars. Screw-seated on the lower portion of rod 32, is a nut and washer 35 and arranged on said rod and interposed between said nut and washer and the swivel block 33, is an expansivecushioning spring 36. V Arranged on the upper portion of rod 32, between loosely mounted washers 37, is an expansive spring 38 which yieldingly resists the up ward swinging movement of the bars 24. Bracket 31 may be clamped to the baror rod 13 at different elevations inorder to adjust and control the tension of spring 38.

1 Secured to the forward portion of one of the bars '24 on the opposite side from frame 23 and slightly to the rear of the axis 26,is a bracket 39, having a vertically disposed half round portion, .40 that serves as a support for the hose Hand secured to the same one of the bars 24 adjacent to the bolt or axis 25, is a hose clamping 'bracket41.

Secured to this bracket 41 is one end ofa'section of coiled wire 42 that surrounds the hose adjacent to the bracket 41 and prevents abrupt bending of said hose. I

The hose that is supported by mysimproved rack or reel, leads from a suitable source of com pressed air supply, either. a tank or pumpbracket 41, which clamps said hose-to the side of the swinging, frame and from said bracket the hose extends forwardly alongside the bars 24, thence upwardly around the support 40, and from thence upwardly to and overv the lefthand one'of the pulleys 16. From this pulley the hose extends downwardly to and-beneath pulley'27, thence up-v wardly to and over the right hand one of the pulleys 16, thence downwardly to pulley 29 and. from thence said hose extends downwardly be tween the'pulleys 28 and 29- andthe free end of said hose is provided with "an air. outlet valve that is adapted to be applied to the filling nipples of pneumatic tires.

For practical purposes I prefer tomount the swinging rack or reel in an elevated position so 7 that it may swing from one side to the other in a plane above the tops of motor vehicles and the length of-the depending portion of the hose is suchthat the end carrying the air control valve may be readily reached by a person standing on the ground or pavement.

In the use of the rack or reel the operator manually engages the depending end portion of the hose and pulleys downwardly thereupon with the result that those portions of the hose between the pulleys 16, 2'7 and 29 will be shortened and which action will swing the free ends of the bars 24 upwardly and inwardly toward the pulleys 16 and during which swinging movement the bars will fulcrum on the axis 25.

Dotted lines in Fig. 1 show the bars 24 and the pulleys 27 and 29 swung upward to their approximate upward limit of movement.

That portion of the hose that is drawn from the rack or reel may be manipulated so as to permit the application of the air control valve on the end of the hose, to the filling nipples and in moving the end of the hose from one tire to another the rack or reel may be readily swung from one side to another upon the axis formed by the pintlesll.

During the upward swinging movement of the arms 24, spring .38 will be compressed so as to store power therein and which power is subsequently exerted to assist in causing the arms 24 to return to their normal horizontal position and which movement occurs when pulling strains on the'withdrawn portion of the hose are relieved.

Spring 36 functions to cushion swivel block 33 and the bars 24 when the same return to their normal position after having been elevated or swung upwardly as just described.

After the tire inflating operations have been accomplished the operator relieves the pulling strains upon the withdrawn portion of the hose and under the influence of gravity and the power stored in spring 38, the bars 24 and the pulleys one'side or the other against the wall or other support to one side of the axis of swinging movement and when so positioned the entire structure occupies an out-of the-way position. a

. By mounting the rack or reel so that it will readily swing through an arc of approximately 180, saidrack may be swung into position so that the hose carrying pulleys are in direct alignment with the pulling strains imparted to that portion-0f the hose that is withdrawn from the rack or reel and such action greatly facilitates tire iniiating' operations.

' Thus it will be seen that I have provided an air service hose rack that is relatively simple in construction, inexpensive of manufacture, ca-

pable of being easily and conveniently manipulated and very effective in performing the func tions for which it is intended.

It will be understood that minor changes in the size, form'and construction of the various 1 parts of my air service hose rack may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without departing from the spirit of my invention, the scope of which is set forth in theappended claims.

I claim as my invention:

7 1. In an air service hose rack, an upright member mounted to swing on a vertical axis, a horizontally disposed framemounted to swing on a horizontal axis on the lower portion of said upvertical swinging movement of the horizontal frame in both directions, a plurality of pulleys journaled on the upper portion of said-upright member, a plurality of pulleys journaled on the free end of said horizontally disposed frame and a hose supported by said pulleys. I

2. In an air service hose rack, an upright member mounted to swing on a vertical axis, a horizontally disposed frame mounted to swing on a horizontal axis on the lower portion of said upright member, a plurality of pulleys journaled on the upper portion of said upright member, a plurality of pulleys journaled on the free end of said horizontally disposed frame, a hose supported by said pulleys meansfor limiting the downward swinging movement of. said frame and a spring for yi'eldingly resisting the upward swinging movement of said frame. 3. In an air service hose rack, an upright memthe upper portion of said upright member, a plurality of pulleys journaled on'the free end of 'said horizontally disposed frame, a hose supported by said pulleys and a spring for cushioning the downward swinging movement of 'said frame.

4. In an air service hose rack, an upright mem ber mounted to swing on a vertical axis, a horizontally disposed frame mounted to swing on a horizontal axis on the lower portion of said upright member, a plurality of pulleys journaled on the upper portion of said upright member, a plurality of pulleys journaled on the free end of said horizontally disposed frame,'a hose supported by said pulleys, a spring; for yieldingly resisting the upward swinging movement of said horizon-I tally disposed frame and a spring for cushioning the downward swinging movement of said frame;

porting pulleys journaled on the free end of said horizontally disposed member, a hose supported by said pulleys, hose supporting brackets on the side of said horizontally disposedframe and means for limiting the downward swingingmovement of.

said frame.

6. In an air service hose rack, an upright mem ber mounted to swing on a vertical axis, said limiting the downward swinging movement'of member being inclined with respect to its axis,- a horizontally disposed frame mounted toiswing on a horizontal'axis on the-lower portion of said member, hose supporting pulleys journaled on the upper portion of said upright member, hose supporting pulleys journaled on the free end of said horizontally disposed member, a hose supported by said pulleys and springs for yieldingly i axis, a horizontally disposed frame mounted to swing on a horizontal axis on the lower portion of said member, hose supporting pulleys journaled on the upper portion of said upright member, hose supporting pulleys journaled on the free endof said horizontally disposed .member, a hose supported by saidpulleys, springs for yieldingly resisting the swinging J movement of said horizontally disposed frame in both directions and hose clamping members arranged on the side of said horizontally disposed frame.

8. In an air service hose rack, a substantially L-shaped frame, the upright member of which is mounted to swing on a 'vertical axis, the hori-. zontalmember of which frame is connected to the lower portion of the verticalmember by a hinge joint having a horizontal axis, means arranged between the upright and horizontal members of said frame for yieldingly resisting the vertical swinging movement of the horizontal member of said framein both directions and for said horizontal member, and hose supporting pul- I leysmounted on the upper portion of the up,- right member and on the outer-portion of the horizontal member of said L-shaped frame.

9. In an air service hose rack, a substantially 115 L-shaped frame, the upright member of which is mounted to swing on a verticalaxis, the horizontal member of which frame is connected to the lower portion of the vertical member by a. hinge joint having. a horizontal axis, hose sup-, porting pulleys-carried by said L-shaped frame and mounted on the upper portion of the upright leg of said frame and on the outer end of the horizontal arm of said frame and springs supported, from the vertical: member and arranged above and below the horizontally disposed member foryieldingly resisting the vertical swinging movement of said horizontally disposed member.

' THOMAS H. 'SHOPE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2560204 *Jun 17, 1947Jul 10, 1951Artos Engineering CoAutomatic strand feed regulator
US2561148 *Apr 7, 1948Jul 17, 1951T W Snow Construction CompanySand dispenser
US2578036 *Feb 27, 1947Dec 11, 1951Berke John ADevice for fueling large aircraft
US2681251 *Jun 12, 1948Jun 15, 1954Bowser IncLiquid dispensing apparatus
US2717136 *Sep 29, 1949Sep 6, 1955Case Co J IHose holder
US2875496 *Mar 6, 1953Mar 3, 1959Fox Norman TLatch for a connecting hose for trailers and the like
US3049312 *Aug 15, 1960Aug 14, 1962Universal Match CorpReceptacle for depository apparatus
US3487850 *Apr 17, 1968Jan 6, 1970Pacific Research & Dev CorpRetraction unit for a dental hose
US3693922 *Mar 2, 1970Sep 26, 1972Gueguen Michel M FSupport for antenna device
US3880188 *Nov 15, 1973Apr 29, 1975Whirlpool CoHose retractor for an appliance
US4557436 *Nov 23, 1984Dec 10, 1985International Computers LimitedApparatus for storing a cable
US5090647 *Feb 19, 1991Feb 25, 1992Clarke Samuel THose trolley
US5295733 *Jul 22, 1992Mar 22, 1994Tamrock World Corporation, N.V.Fiber optic remote control system for a continuous miner and method of use
US7637460 *Dec 22, 2006Dec 29, 2009Raytheon CompanyMethods and apparatus for a cable retractor to prevent cable damage after connector release
US8622481Jan 25, 2011Jan 7, 2014Joy Mm Delaware, Inc.Fiber optic cable protection in a mining system
US8882081 *May 17, 2012Nov 11, 2014Shenzhen China Star Optoelectronics Technology Co., Ltd.Line guiding structure
US8950822Nov 20, 2013Feb 10, 2015Joy Mm Delaware, Inc.Fiber optic cable protection in a mining system
US20130256363 *May 17, 2012Oct 3, 2013Shenzhen China Star Optoelectronics Technology Co., Ltd.Line guiding structure
WO2005012778A2 *Jul 30, 2004Feb 10, 2005Tilia Int IncRetractable canister hose and fitting
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/371, 242/388.91, 137/355.23, 242/615.1, 242/397.2, 221/95, 362/403, 248/289.11, 248/89, 242/129.2, 222/180, 242/615.2, 242/397.1
International ClassificationB65H75/48, B65H75/38, B60S5/04, B60S5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/48, B60S5/04
European ClassificationB60S5/04, B65H75/48