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Publication numberUS1940728 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1933
Filing dateFeb 11, 1933
Priority dateFeb 11, 1933
Publication numberUS 1940728 A, US 1940728A, US-A-1940728, US1940728 A, US1940728A
InventorsO'connor Burdett H
Original AssigneeO'connor Burdett H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe cleaning and polishing glove
US 1940728 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 26,1933. B, H. ocONNoR SHOE CLEANING AND POLISHING GLOVE Filed Feb. 11, 1935 IIIIIPI MW www@ m0 m H g E D E lus Patented Dec. 26, 11,933

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE The present invention relates to a cleaning and polishing glove which is particularly adapted for cleaning and polishing shoes. It is'often inconvenient for people, particularly in their homes,

offices or when traveling from place to place to have their shoes shined at frequent intervals by persons provided with the necessary cleaning and polishing` equipment. As a general rule the normal frequency of trips to a shoeshine parlor is not suilicient to keep a persons shoes in satisfactory A shined and polished condition duringl a normal days activities.

It has been quite customary to attempt to meet this need for intermediate shoe polishing by supplying shoe rags and shining cloths which, however, are not generally satisfactory inpractical utilization because of the fact that they rub olf the shine of the shoe and generally give it a scufled appearance which is not very attractive.

An object of the present invention is to provide a convenient shoe shining pack or equipment which will not require the utilization of liquid or paste shoe polishes liable to harden and not subject to convenient storage and application and which will apply a desirable amount of polish to the shoes to cause them to retain their desired nish for a relatively long period of time.

Another object is to provide a convenient shoe cleaning glove which may be utilized both to apply polish and to shine shoes, as well as to cleanse them, and which at the same time may be conveniently packaged, stored and carried from place to place by the person utilizing the same.

Another object is to provide a convenient, inexpensive, light weight and durable shoe cleaning and polishing glove which will carry polishing material and which may be utilized to apply such polishing material to the shoes as well as to cleanse and polish the shoes respectively before and after such application, and at the same time may be utilized without contaminating or dirtying the lingers of the user of such material.

Other objects will be obvious and appear during the course of the specification.

In accomplishing the above objects of the present invention it has been found most convenient to form the glove of two pieces of material, one to carry the polishing substance for application and the other including a cleaning and polishing cloth. In one construction the glove is also provided with a suitable liner into which the hand of the user may be placed. The liner may preferably be of a white material.

The polish carrying face is preferably of a relatively coarse fabric. To this relatively coarse fabric maybe added pieces of shoe polish matel rial suitably arranged so as to be distributed over the entire surface of the face.

This shoe polishing material may take the form of buttons, squares, stars or cylinders of a shoe polishing wax, which preferably firmly and rigidly remains solid at all normal atmospheric temperatures and humidities.

In one form of the invention the button is made of frustro conical shape and it may be at- 55 tached to the coarse fabric by fusing the button to the fabric, by cementing the button to the fabric or by causing the base of the frustrated cone to unite with .the mesh of the fabric. In another embodiment the bases of the cones are provided with Shanks of reduced vdiameter which are tted through openings in the material and are then clinched over so as to firmly attach themselves to the fabric.

The cleansing and/or polishing face of the glove is preferably formed of a white fabric with a linty surface which will serve most effectively for removing dirt, dust and grime from the shoes and for polishing them after application of the polishing wax from the other side of the glove.

The buttons or other pieces of polishing wax are preferably distributed over the application face of the glove in such an arrangement that suitable flexibility may be provided for the hand of the user to t the application face of the glove to all faces or the surfaces of the shoe to be polished, and so that at the same time upon passing the appying face of the glove over the shoe surface, the wax will be applied. in a uniform layer and evenly over such shoe surface. As stated before the shoe polishing wax should be in such condition that it will not soften'at summer temperatures and humidities andatthe same time itfshould. not be of such character that it may not be readily applied uniformly` and evenly by a fairly light pressure by the users hand.

The above and other objects will appear more clearly from the following detailed description, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, which illustrates preferred embodiments of the inventive idea.

In the drawing: Fig. 1 lshows the applying face of the glove upon'the line 1-1 of Fig. 2. 105

Fig. 2 is a side sectional view upon the line 2-2 of Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view 'showing one of the polishing buttons in po- Sition. in. combination with the glove.

' twenty to an inch. '55

Fig. 4 is a side elevational view of one of the polishing buttons before application, and

Fig. 5 illustrates an alternative method of applying the button to the glove.

In Figs. 1 and 2 the glove is composed of two fabric faces 10 and 11 which are joined together by the seam 12 along the edge of the glove. As shown, the glove takes the form of a mitten but it is obvious that it may be made of many other shapes and designs so as to more or less fit the lingers, or the curves or surfaces of the shoe.

The fabric face 11 includes a linty or shoddy surface indicated at 13 which has been found most effective for cleaning and polishing purposes. The cloth 11 is preferably white or gray in color so as to clearly distinguish'it from the other fabric face 10 which is preferably black or a relatively dark hue. The fabric face 10 may consist of a relatively coarse fabric if desired to which are attached the polishing buttons 14.

These buttons, as indicated in Figs. 3 and 4,I

are of frustro conical shape. In one embodiment where it was found satisfactory to make the glove of the dimension of 6" wide by 8" long, these buttons were conveniently made of in diameter at their upper surface 15 and 1/" in diameter at their base 16. However, it is to' be understood that these buttons may be of any shape such as ridges, squares, stars, crescents and so forth, and if desired, even a single large button may be applied to the application face 10 of the glove. However, it usually has been found satisfactory to distribute the buttons or other pieces of polishing substances over the application surface of the glove so that they will not interfere with the flexibility ofthe glove and to make them of such relatively small size that they will not be flexed or ruptured by the hand of the user in fitting the application side of the glove to the curve or irregular vsurfaces of the shoe. As indicated in Fig. 3 the fabric face 10 is provided with openings 17 into which may be fitted the shanks 18 of reduced diameter forming an integral portion of the buttons 14. These shanks 18 may be inserted through the openings 17 and riveted orforced down as indicated at 19 in Fig. 3 vto form a rigid attachment to the fabric 10.

In Fig. 5 is illustrated a slightly different attachment of the button 14' to the fabric 10' wherein the base portion 16' of the button is fused or otherwise embedded in the fabric 10'. The fabric 10' in this embodiment is preferably of a relatively coarse mesh not much closer than The polishing buttons may either be of black polish of any desired shape, or brown polish or any other suitable color, and the fabric face 10 should preferably be made of a similar suitable shade. As previously stated the polishing and cleansing face 11 may be of white cloth and a liner 25 (see Fig. 2) may be desirably provided to keep the inside ends of the button 14 or 14' from contacting the hands of the user and contaminating or dirtying them. As shown in Fig. 2 the liner 25 only extends over the interior of that portion of the glove which carries the polishing buttons, but if desired the entire inside of the glove may be lined with a white material.

As is evident the cleansing and polishing glove of the present invention is most conveniently stored in desks, closets and in traveling equipment and may be readily utilized at any time without difficulty. It is inexpensive to manufacture, very compact and may be utilized for quite a long period of time. Due to its inexpensive character it offers itself widelytfor novelty purposes and it may be sold and distributed either without c'ost to accompany other merchandise or as an introductory offer for canvassing and soliciting firms.

It is possible that pieces or buttons of glass or metal polishing material may be added to one face of the glove similar to the button 14 indicated in Figs. 1 and 2, with the result that the glove might be used for polishing either glass or metal or other materials.

The preferred polishing wax maybe of several compositions, one illustrative composition being three parts of carnaubaqwax, three parts of beeswax, one part of paraflln two parts of turpentine oil and about one-tenth of a part of a coloring material, such as a black or brown anlline dye. This composition, of course, may be varied to produce the plastic -polishing material so that it will remain in the form of a firm, rigid, solid at all normal atmospheric temperatures and humidities, and so that the material will lend itself to ready and uniform application upon very light pressure by the users hand.

These compositions are preferably made up by heating together the various waxes to about 180 F., to assure thorough .incorporation of these waxes together. Then the color which may be either national aniline oil black 38226, or national aniline oil yellow 2681, or other equivalent oil soluble yellow or blacks may be dissolved in the turpentine oil. After the waxes have been cooled to 140, the solution of oil yellow or black in turpentine is added and the whole is mixed together and cooled to form a solid mixture which may be formed into buttons 15, as shown in the drawing.

'I'hese buttons 15, as shown in Fig. 5, may conveniently be connected to the cloth by pouring the wax in melted condition into a button forming mold, the cloth being in the bottom of the mold.

It is obvious that many changes and modications may be made in the invention and it is intended to include all such changes and modifications therein as may come within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A shoe cleansing, shining and polishing glove consisting of two fabric faces sewed together to form a glove-like enclosure, one end of which is open for insertion of the hand of the user, one face carrying distributed pieces of polishing material for application to the shoe, said pieces of polishing material projecting from said carrying face and being exposed so that they will directly contact with the shoe, and also largely preventing contact between said carrying face and said shoe during the application of the polishing material, and the other face consisting of a cloth for cleansing the shoes before and for polishing them after application of the polish attached to the other face, said distributed pieces taking the form of relatively flat buttons which are formed of a plastic shoe polishing material which will remain in the form of a firm rigid solid at all normal atmospheric temperatures and humidities, said buttons being so spaced and positioned that they will be sufliciently close together ,whereby upon applying the face of the glove over the shoe surface, the wax will be applied uniformly over such shoe surface by a fairly light pressure of the users hand, and at the same time being spaced sufficiently farv apart that the button carrying face of the glove may be exed to t the contour of the shoe for application of the polish thereto without the separated buttons coming in contact with or rubbing on each other.

2. A shoe cleansing, shining and polishing glove consisting of two fabric faces sewed together to form a glove-like enclosure, one end of which is open for insertion of the hand of the user, one face carrying distributed pieces of polishing material for application to the shoe, said pieces of polishing material projecting from said carrying face and being exposed so that they will directly contact with the shoe, and also largely preventing contact between said carrying face and said shoeduring the application of the polishing material, and the other face consisting of a cloth for cleansing the shoes before and for polishing them after application of the polish attached to the other face, said polishing material being applied in the form of spaced or distributed buttons over the entire application surface of the glove, said distributed pieces taking the form of relatively fiat buttons which are formed of a plastic shoe polishing material which will remain in the form of a rm rigid solid at all normal atmospheric temperatures and humidities, and said buttons being formed of a plastic polishing material which will not substantially soften at summer temperatures and humidities and which is of such a composition as to lend itself to ready and uniform application by fairly light pressure by the users hand.

3. A shoe cleansing, shining and polishing glove consisting of two fabric faces sewed together to form a glove-like enclosure, one end of which is open for insertion of the hand of the user, one face carrying distributed pieces of polishing material for application to the shoe, said pieces of polishing material projecting from said carrying face and being exposed so that they will directly contact with the shoe, and also largely preventing contact between said carrying during the application of the polishing material, and the other face consisting of a cloth for cleansing the shoes before and for polishing them after application of the polishing material attached to the other face, said polishing material being attached in the form of distributed spaced buttons over the entire application face of the glove, said buttons being made of such a size that they will not be ruptured upon application of the glove to the shoe with normal pressure of the hand, said distributed pieces taking the form of relatively at buttons which are formed of a plastic shoe polishing material which will remain in the form of a firm rigid solid at all normal atmospheric temperatures and humidities, and said buttons being formed of a plastic polishing ma terial which will not substantially soften at summer temperatures and humidities and which is of such a composition as to lend itself to ready and uniform application by fairly light pressure by the users hand.

4. A shoe cleansing, shining and polishing glove consisting of two fabric faces sewed together to form a glove-like enclosure, one end of which is open for insertion of the hand of the user, one face carrying distributed pieces of polishing material for application to the shoe, said pieces of polishing material projecting from said carrying face and being exposed so that they will directly contact with the shoe, and also largely preventing contact between said carrying face and said shoe during the application of the polishing material, and the other face consisting of a cloth for cleansing the shoes before and for polishing them after application of the polishing material attached to the other face. said material being applied to said face and said shoe.

face in the form. of distributed and spaced buttons which are of such consistency and hardness that they will not soften readily or melt even at relatively high summer atmospheric temperatures and at the same time being of such character that the substance thereof may be readily applied in the form of a very thin film to the surface of the shoe upon normal pressure of the hand.

5. A shoe cleansing, shining and polishing glove consisting of two fabric faces sewed together to form a glove-like enclosure, one end of which is open for insertion of the hand of the user, one face carrying distributed pieces of polishing material for application to the shoe, said pieces of polishing material projecting from said carrying face and being exposed so that they will directly contact with the shoe, and also largely preventlng contact between said carrying face and said shoe during the application of the polishing materiai, and the other face consisting of a cloth for cleansing the shoes before and for polishing them after application of the polishing material attached to the other face, said polishing material being applied in the form of distributed frustro conical shaped buttons over the application face of the glove, which buttons are provided with Shanks passing through openings provided in the application face of the glove, which Shanks are clinched to hold the buttons rmly and rigidly in position, said distributed pieces taking the form of relatively iiat buttons which are formed of a plastic shoe polishing material which will remain in the form of a firm rigid solid at all normal atmospheric temperatures and humidities, and said buttons being formed of a plastic polishing material which will not substantially soften at summer temperatures and humidities and which is of such a composition as to lend itself to ready and uniform application by fairly light pressure by the users hand.

6. A shoe cleansing, shining and polishing glove consisting of two fabric faces sewed together to form a glove-like enclosure, 'one end of which is open for insertion of the hand of the user, one face carrying distributed pieces of polishing wax material for application to the shoe, said pieces of polishing material projecting from said carrying face and being exposed so that they will directly contact with the shoe, and also largely preventing contact between said carrying face and said shoe during the application of the polishing material, and the other face consisting of a linty cloth for cleansing the shoes before and for polishing them after application of the wax attached to the other face. said polishing material carrying face being formed of a relatively coarse ,fabric and said polishing material taking the form of distributed spaced buttons of frustro conical shape, the bases of which are united by fusion with the mesh of the coarse fabric, said distributed pieces taking the form of relatively flat buttons which are formed of a plastic shoe polishing material which will remain in the form of a rm rigid solid at all normal atmospheric temperatures and humidities, and said buttons being formed of a plastic polishing material which will not substantially soften at summer temperatures and humidities and which is of such a composition as to lend itself to ready and uniform application by fairly light pressure by the users hand.

BURDETT H. OCONNOR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2420734 *Feb 4, 1946May 20, 1947Churchill Charles HToilet soap novelty
US2745128 *May 29, 1952May 15, 1956Ann ZeunerCombination plastic mitten and sponge rubber washing device
US3777328 *Mar 22, 1972Dec 11, 1973Sentinel Bag And Paper Co IncShoe polishing mit
US5357659 *Dec 27, 1990Oct 25, 1994Ackermann Walter TPlastic article in situ molded to a porous substrate
US6241580Oct 20, 1999Jun 5, 2001Kurt W. FisherPolish applying and buffing mitt, kit and method
US6494767Mar 19, 2001Dec 17, 2002Kurt W. FisherPolish and applying buffing mitt, kit and method
US6984165Oct 20, 2000Jan 10, 2006Fisher Kurt WPolish and applying buffing mitt, kit and method
US7484261Sep 30, 2004Feb 3, 2009Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Spot cleaner
US7584519 *Jun 5, 2003Sep 8, 2009The Clorox CompanyDisposable mitt or glove containing treatment composition
US20040244132 *Jun 5, 2003Dec 9, 2004William OuelletteDisposable mitt or glove containing treatment composition
US20050241088 *Apr 30, 2004Nov 3, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Device for treating surfaces
US20050241089 *Mar 4, 2005Nov 3, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Device for treating surfaces
US20110078928 *Oct 2, 2009Apr 7, 2011Scott BarnhillShoe protection article
US20120189371 *Apr 26, 2010Jul 26, 2012Claudio MorelliMultipurpose dispensing glove suitable for direct manual washing
USD668821 *Nov 15, 2010Oct 9, 2012Margaret M DonnellyMitt for massaging horses
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/7, 118/201, D28/7, 401/35, D29/118, 401/88, 15/227, 118/76
International ClassificationA47L23/10, A47L23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L23/10
European ClassificationA47L23/10