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Publication numberUS1941041 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1933
Filing dateMar 23, 1932
Priority dateMar 23, 1932
Publication numberUS 1941041 A, US 1941041A, US-A-1941041, US1941041 A, US1941041A
InventorsMckee John A
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package for can ends and method of producing same
US 1941041 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. A. McKEE Daze, 1933.

PACKAGE FOR can ENDS AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME- Filed March 23, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 A w A v x @b Dec. 26, .1933. .1. A. M KEE 1,941,041

PACKAGE FOR CAN ENDS AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME Filed March 23, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Dec. 26, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PACKAGE FOR CAN ENDS AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME Application March 23, 1932. Serial No. 600,769

3 Claims.

The invention relates to new and useful improvements in a package for can ends, and in the method of producing the same.

An object of the invention is to provide a package for can ends whereby the can ends may be placed in unit packages of a predetermined number each, and the unit packages crated on a skid to facilitate the handling of the same.

A further object of the invention is to provide a method of packaging can ends wherein the ends may be handled in unit packages ofapredetermined number each, and wherein a skid crate is provided that can be cheaply made and scrapped after use.

In the drawings- Figure 1 is a side-view of a completed package of can ends ready for shipment;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the same;

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view of the skid on which the can end unit packages are stacked;

Fig. 4 is a side viewof the package;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on the line a-a of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is a detail showing an angle clip used in connection with the package;

Fig. '7 is a detail showing a portion of the end of the skid in side view, with the angle clip attached thereto;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of one of the unit wrapped packages;

Fig. 9 is a transverse section through a portion of one of the stacked units.

The invention has to do with the packaging of can ends for shipment. The can ends are wrapped in unit packages of a predetermined number each. This is accomplished by stacking the desired number of can ends, then wrapping the stacked ends in paper to form a cylindrical package. The paper is firmly wrapped about the ends, and the ends of the paper wrapper folded down on to the stacked ends, after which the paper is secured in any desired way, but preferably by adhesive strips, so as to make a very firm unit package of ends. These unit packages are all of a predetermined size. The unit packages are placed on a skid which may be made of wood, metal or any suitable material, and is in the form of a fiat table member on which the unit packages may be laid, with their axes extending transversely across the skid and with the ends of the unit packages substantially flush with the side edges of the skid. The skid table is mounted on legs preferably in the form of cross members so that the table is raised from the floor to permit the arms of a truck to pass under the skid for raising and moving the same. Extending upwardly from the ends of the skid are end members which terminate short of the height of the crated package that is to be produced. Extending along the top of the table and 60 up the side members is a strip of corrugated paper. This strip of corrugated paper extends above the ends of the side members. The unit packages of can ends are stacked on the skid between the side members to a height above the 5 ends of the side members. The strips of corrugated paper are then folded down on to the ends and preferably a flexible metal strip placed on the corrugated paper, after which a bailing band is placed around the skid, the side walls and the corrugated paper covering the top of the package, and the ends of the bailing band are clamped together after it has been drawn taut, fiimly binding together the unit packages, andv the unit packages to the skid. The sheets of corrugated paper may also be attached to the skid and extend up along the open sides of the crate, covering the endsof the unit packages, and the bailing band may be placed about the center of the package, if desired.

Referring more in detail to the drawings, the can ends are indicated at C in the drawings, and these can ends are placed side by side, or one on top of the other to'form a stack containing a predetermined number of can ends. A paper 55 indicated at 1 in the drawings is placed around the stacked ends and the edges thereof firmly joined by a sealing strip indicated at 2. The portions of the paper projecting'beyond the can ends are folded down in the usual way, and the strip 2 extends across the ends, and another strip 3 is applied, so that the can ends are firmly wrapped in the paper, thus forming a unit package which may be readily handled. It will be understood that other sealing means may be used, and the projecting portions of the paper may be otherwise folded than illustrated in the drawings. The essential thing is the wrapping of the ends to form a unit package of a predetermined size. These unit packages are placed on a skid for crating. The skid consists of a table portion 4 which, as shown in the drawings, consists of three spaced members 5, 6 and 7. These members are attached to cross legs 8. There are three cross legs shown, and they are of such dimension as to support the table a sufficient distance from the floor so as to permit the arms of a truck to be placed underneath the skid for the lifting and conveying of the same to a desired position. At

the ends of the table 4 is a side member 9 which is attached to the center member 6 of the table. At the other end of the skid is a side member 10.

These side members extend upward substantiallyat right angles to the table portion of the skid and terminate short of the upper end of the crated packages of can ends. The crated packages are indicated at P. The length-of the table is so dimensioned that when these unit packages are placed on the table with their axes extending transversely of the table, the unit packages will contact with each other and with the side mem-' bers, as indicated in Fig. 1 of the drawings. The next row of unit packages is staggered relative to the first row, as indicated in this figure, and will have therein one less number of unit packages. The next row is again placed similar to the first row, with the unit packages contacting with the side members 9 and 10. Thus the unit packages of can ends are stacked on the skid to a height so that the row indicated at R extends slightly above the side members 9 and 10. The top row R contains one less unit package than the row R.

Extending across the top of the skid is a sheet of corrugated paper indicated at 11. This corrugated paper also extends up the side members as indicated at 12 and 13, and to a sufficient distance above the side members, so that the end portions of the strip may be folded down into lapped relation on top of the top row of unit packages. A strip of tin or other flexible metal indicated at 14 is laid on top of the paper and extends from a point slightly below the upper end of the side member 9 to a point slightly below the upper end of the side member 10. At each end of the table 4 of the skid is a metal angle clip 15. This clip is nailed to the table or otherwise secured thereto, and is provided with projecting ribs 16, 16. The legs 8 of the skid are each provided with an opening 17 directly beneath the center member 6. A bailing band 18 extends through these openings and over the angle clips between the ribs 16, 16, and up along each side member 9 and 10 centrally thereof, thence centrally along the metal strip 14. The. ends of this bailing band are passed through a sealing clip 19 which is of the usual construction and which v serves to lock the. ends of the band when they are drawn tight around the package. When this band is drawn tight, it will bear on the unit packages of ends, forcing the same tightly against each other and against the side members and the skid, thus not only clamping the unit packages together, but to the skid. Suitable staples 20, 20 may be used for preventing the bailing band from slipping laterally on the side member. The corrugated strip of'paper may be made of any suitable width. It is shown of substantially the same width as the table and extends to a point slightly above the upper endof the side member This may be made of any desired width. It may be all in one piece, or in separate pieces. The purpose of the corrugated paper is not only to aid in holding the unit packages and protecting the same from being broken, but it also prevents chafing and wearing of the wrapper of the unit package where it contacts with the parts of the crate.

As shown in Fig. 5 of the drawings there are sheets of corrugated paper indicated'at21 and 22 which extend from-one side member to the other and from the table to the top of the package, and are folded around on to the 'side members for the purpose of enclosing the ends. Attached to the side member 9 is a cross bar 23 and attached to the side member 10 is a cross bar 24. A bailing band 25 extends horizontally about the crate substantially at mid-height thereof, and the ends of the bail ng band are joined by a seal 26. This placing of a bailing band about the center of the crate is especially useful in the shipping of the crates to distant points where it is subjected to considerable handling and rough storage. The crate as shown in Figures 1 to 4 is particularly intended for use in the loading of freight cars. Inasmuch as there are a predetermined number of ends in each unit package, the crate may have therein a predetermined number of unit packages, and this provides a ready means for determining the number of can ends shipped. The crate as described may be made almost wholly of wood and paper, which may be scrapped when the package is broken, and therefore, the package may be made very cheaply.

It is obvious that other arrangements of the crating members may be made than that shown in the drawings, the essential feature of the in-. vention is the method of handling the can ends and the crated package produced by said method. It is essential that the can ends shall be wrapped in unit packages and that means shall be provided for the securing of the unit packages together and to a skid so constructed that it may be readily lifted and transported from one point to another.

Having thus described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters- Patent, is-

1. The'combination of a skid, side members at the ends thereof extending vertically, strips of corrugated paper on the upper face of the skid and the inner faces of the side-members, cylindrical unit packages of can ends of a predetermined number each stacked on said skid and between said side members with their axes parallel and with the ends of the packages substantially flush with the side edges of the skid, a strip of corrugated paper extending from the upper end of one side member to the upper end of the other side member, a strip of flexible metal at the outer face of said last-named strip of corrugated paper, a bailing band extending in a vertical plane 1ongitudinallyof the skid and at right angles to the axes of the unit packages and encircling the skid, the side members, the corrugated strips of paper and the metal strip, and having its ends joined for clamping the unit packages together and to the skid and side members, and angle clips attached to the skid at each end thereof and having spaced ribs between which the bailing band may be placed and held thereby from lateral movement.

2. The combination of a skid, side members at the ends thereof. extending vertically, strips of corrugated paper on the upper face of the ski and the inner faces of theside members, cylindrical unit packages of can ends of a predetermined number each stacked on said skid and be- 140 tween said side members withtheir axes parallel and with the ends of the packages substantially flush with the side edges of the skid, a strip of corrugated paper extending from the upper end of one side member to the upper end of the other 4 side member, a strip of flexible metal at the outer face of said last-named strip of corrugated paper, a bailing band extending in a vertical plane longitudinally of the skid and at right angles to the axes of the unit packages and encircling the joined for clamping the unit packages together and to the skid and side members, angle clips attached to the skid at each end thereof and having spaced ribs between which the bailing band may be placed and held thereby from lateral movement, and a bailing band extending in a horizontal plane around the side members and mined number each, stacked on said skid and between said side members with their axes parallel and with the ends of the packages substantially flush with the side edges of the skid, a strip of corrugated paper extending from the upper end of one side member to the upper end of the other side member, a strip of flexible metal at the outer face of said last named strip of corrugated paper, a bailing band extending in a vertical plane longitudinally of the skid and at right angles to the axes of the unit packages and encircling the skid, side members, the corrugated strips of paper and metal strip and having its ends joined for clamping the unit packages together and to the skid and side members.

JOHN A. McKEE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2605897 *Oct 21, 1949Aug 5, 1952John B RundlePackage
US2667995 *May 31, 1950Feb 2, 1954Bruce Engineering CorpCombined merchandising package and article carrier
US2713940 *Dec 2, 1952Jul 26, 1955Bruce Douglas BToothbrush tray
US3057472 *Feb 7, 1961Oct 9, 1962United States Steel CorpPackage of slender articles and method of manufacture
US3235071 *Sep 19, 1962Feb 15, 1966Interlake Steel CorpCorrugated binder strap
US3288311 *Jun 12, 1964Nov 29, 1966Beattie Donald PSkid
US3357554 *Jun 3, 1966Dec 12, 1967Continental Can CoCan end package
US4050664 *May 27, 1976Sep 27, 1977Daley Thomas GObject support with strapping means
US6792742Sep 9, 2002Sep 21, 2004Phoenix Closures, Inc.Method for storing and/or transporting items
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/597, 206/599, 24/20.00R, 206/445, 206/443
International ClassificationB65D85/58
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/58
European ClassificationB65D85/58