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Publication numberUS1941930 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1934
Filing dateJul 15, 1932
Publication numberUS 1941930 A, US 1941930A, US-A-1941930, US1941930 A, US1941930A
InventorsP. Collet
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and means for replacing railroad rails
US 1941930 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 2, 1934.

P. COLLET El AL METHOD AND MEANS FOR REPLACING RAILROAD RAILS Filed July 15, 1932 6' Sheets-Sheet '1 w vm ia nwwfin fizuenfor-s. Pierre C'qZZef Rene .Lozseau Jan- 2, 1934- P. COLLET ET AL.

METHOD AND MEANS FOR REPLACING RAILROAD RAILS Filed July 15, 1932 Renee .Loz'seau 216 (Mama Ht:

Jan. 2, 1934. P. COLLET ET AL METHOD AND MEANS FOR REPLACING RAILROAD RAILS Filed July 15, 1932 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 iiwenz ars: Her/e C'iollaii. b Rene .Loc'seau Jan. 2, 1934.

P. COLLET ET AL METHOD AND MEANS FOR REPLACING RAILROAD RAILS Filed July 15, 1932 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 .f'nvenz'or-sz .Pz'erre Cllef Rene .L'oiseaa Jan. 2, 1934. P. COLLET ET AL 1,941,930

METHOD AND MEANS FOR REPLAC ING RAILROAD RAILS Filed July 15, 1932 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Prrv-e 02 226? fine lozsea u y 5% umdzum 15 9,

anions."

Jan. 2, 1934.

P. COLLET ET AL 1,941,930

METHOD AND MEANS FOR REPLACING RAILROAD RAILS Filed July 15, 1932 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Pierre C'oZZet ReneLoiseaw Patented Jan. 2, 1934 lliETHOD AND MEANS FOR REPLACING RAILROAD RAILS Pierre Collet and Rene Loiseau, Paris, France; said Collet assignor to Les File BAlbert Gollet, Faris, France, a company of France Application July 15, 1932, Serial No. 622,792, and in France July 18, 1931 3 Claims.

In the maintenance of the road beds of railways, it is often necessary to replace the rails, either because they are worn or because the increase in trafiic requires a larger cross-section, or for other reasons. Before our invention the replacement has been effected as follows: The new rails are stacked, and after removal of the old rails the new rails are laid in place, the positioning being performed either by hand or by means of handling devices running over the still existing portions of the old track. When the cross-section of the rail is being changed, the rail seats in the ties are readzed by hand or by means of a mechanical device.

Such operation is lengthy and toilsome and requires considerable skilled labor, chiefly for readzing the seats.

The method according to our invention removes these drawbacks and provides a very ma- 2 terial economy in labor, at the same time requiring no skilled workman.

It consists primarily in using the new rails required for replacement, for first laying a service track parallel to the track which is to be replaced. This service track serves for performing all the operations required in the changing of rails: to wit the removal of the old rails, the readzing of the ties, the boring of holes in the ties, the impregnation of the seats, and the handling of the material in the yard, after which the service rails are slipped in place of the removed rails and over the old ties so as to form the new track.

In the form of our invention, which is preferred we use traveling jacks extending over the service track for transporting the rails which have been removed, on to low flat cars running on the old track, the fiat cars being then caused to move on while the jacks which are left in place enable the removal of a further length of the old track rails thus uncovered, thus making the replacement a continuous operation.

Our invention also has for its object the production of new apparatus for carrying out our novel method.

Our invention will be more readily understood from the following description given by way of example and corresponding to the appended drawings.

Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 1a, 2a., 3a and 4a show diagrammatically both in side and in plan views the different phases in the execution of our method.

Fig. 5 is an end View of a fiat car and a travelling jack used for the replacement operation.

5 Fig. 6 is an end view of a car adapted to run both on the service track and-on the old track.

the old rails.

Fig. 7 is a side view of the tie brushing device.

Figs. 8 and 9 are similar views of the tie readzing device and a modification thereof.

Fig. 10 shows in a similar manner the tie boring device.

Figs. 11 and 12 are side and end views of the tie impregnating device.

Figs. 13 and 14 are side and end views of an auxiliary system aiding in handling the rails.

We will first describe in detail with reference to Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4 and la, 2a, 3a and 4a the succession of operations according to one manner of executing our invention.

Fig. 1 shows a train such as may be used for replacing the rails over a certain track length. 9 This train comprises a work car 1, a certain number of low fiat cars 2, 3, two in the example shown, each provided each with three trucks and carrying the new rails intended for replacement, empty cars 4, and cars 5 similar to cars 4-and carrying the material required for replacement and operation.

Fig. 2 shows the rails unloaded from their fiat cars and disposed on either side of the old track 7 so as to form a service track 8. To this end the new rails are alined and connected together so as to form two continuous lines running parallel with the old rails and suitably spaced apart, say about 2.30 meters. In the case of the usual track the gauge is 1,435 meters.

Fig. 3 illustrates the removal of the rails of the old track '7 between the rails of the service track 8. After dividing the train, the work car 1 and the fiat cars 2, 3 advance leaving behind them the cars 4 and 5 on a part of the old track alongside of which no service track has been laid.

In the part of the track located between the flat cars 2, 3 and the cars 4, 5, the rails to be replaced are freed from their securing means. Travelling jacks 9 are then set on the service track for raising the rails and these jacks carrying the removed rails are carried along the service rails over the flat cars 2, 3 on which they deposit the rails, so that the flat cars are loaded with The empty cars 4 (Fig. 4) are then brought to the front of the removed part of the old track 7.

To this end, the cars are provided with means for running on both the old track and on the service track. Between the empty cars 4 and the cars 5 out of which we remove the desired material, may be arranged a miniature yard with devices adapted to run over the service track. These devices comprise for instance a tie brushing device ll, a device 12 for readzing the ties, a device 13 for boring them and a device 14 for spraying a preservative on these ties, it being assumed in the cited case that the old rails are to be replaced by new rails having a different cross-section and that it is necessary to readze the ties.

It will be noticed that after the travelling jacks have unloaded their used rails on the fiat cars 2 and 3, they are in a suitable position for the further removal of the old track, after the flat cars have been advanced. The operation thus may be a continuous one.

Once these different operations are at an end, the rail securing material such as coach screws, spikes, chairs, saddles and the like contained in the cars 5 are distributed along the service track 8. It is then sufiicient to slip the service rails 8 on the ties in the place which was previously occupied by the removed rails and to secure them in the place prepared for them.

We will now describe with more detail the different apparatuses which may be used to advantage for executing our invention.

Fig. 5 shows in front view a three-truck flat car for transporting the new and the old rails, together with one of the travelling jacks serving for the removal of these rails from the old track on to the flat cars. The latter are comparatively low cars of the ordinary type comprising pairs of wheels 16 interconnected through rigid bars with a gauge or spacing such that they can run over the old track 7. The travelling jacks each comprise a rigid bar 19 resting on pairs of wheels 21, the gauge or spacing of which is such that they can run over the service track 3. Jacks 22 controlled through the hand wheels 23 permit adjusting the bar 19 into horizontal position when the rails 8 of the service track are not at the same height, for instance at curves where one of the rails is elevated above the other. The hoisting device 24 may run along the bar 19. The handwheel 25 of this device controls the cable 26 and the pincers 27 whereby it is possible to lower a rail such as 28 on to the flat car.

Fig. 6 shows one of the cars (such as those designated as 4 and 5 on Figs. 1 to 4) which may run both on the old track and on the service track. These cars comprise a box such as 29, and their wheel pairs 31 have a gauge or spacing corresponding to normal gauge and are connected through rigid bars 32 both with each other and with pairs of wheels 33, the spacing of which corresponds to the gauge of the service track. The pairs of wheels 33 are connected with the bar 32 through the jacks 34 actuated by the handwheels 35. These jacks when required, bodily raise the normal wheels 31, together with the bar 32.

Fig. '7 shows the apparatus for brushing the ties after removal of the old track. This brushing device is carried by the pairs of wheels or rollers 36 spaced in accordance to the gauge of the service track 8. It comprises a mechanical, electrical or other pneumatic suitable motor 37 which drives, through a suitable transmission, very hard rotary brushes 33 which brush the part of the tie 39 which is to be readzed, in those cases Where the seat of the tie is to be reformed in accordance with a rail cross-section differing from the original rail cross-section.

Figs. 8 and 9 show two diiferent forms of readzing devices.

The apparatus of Fig. 8 is mounted on pairs of wheels or rollers 41 running over the service track and connected through the bar 42 carrying the two usual adzing tools 43, 43 controlled mechanically, pneumatically or electrically. The apparatus is capable of two adjustments. On one hand the tools are mounted on a common carriage 44 which may be moved as a whole along the bar 42 under the action of the handwheel 45. On the other hand the micrometric screw 46 controlled by the handwheel 47 allows the spacing between the two tools to be varied, an action which is necessary in view of the curves where the gauge is increased.

In the modification of Fig. 9 the pairs of wheels 41 are secured to the transverse bar 42 through the agency of jacks 48 which allow the horizontal position of the bar 42 to be restored. The screw 49, cooperating with the nut 51 carried by the connecting rod 52, provides means for the simultaneous displacement of the adzing tools 43-43.

The boring device shown in Fig. 10 comprises mechanical, pneumatic or electric boring tools 55 connected together through a cross-bar 56 provided with pairs of wheels 57 running over the service track 8.

Lastly Figs. 11 and 12 show a device which may be used for impregnating the new seats and bored holes with a preservative. This device comprises pairs of wheels 58 adapted to run over the service track and held at the desired spacing or gauge by means or" a rigid frame 59 carrying the preservative containers 61. The frame 59 carries a brush 62 adapted to remove wood shavings and the like from the part of the sleeper which is to be treated with the preservative. This brush is secured to the front of the device, assuming motion in the direction of the arrow. On the other hand a spraying nozzle 63 is in communication with the reservoir 61 and the distance between the brush 61 and the nozzle 63 is equal to the spacing between two ties 39.

Of course these apparatuses have been described only by way of example and we may execute the method according to our invention through the agency of any other automatic or nonautomatic devices.

The arrangement shown in Figs. 13 to 14 provides considerable facilities for sliding or moving the rails, this rail sliding or moving operation generally being rather toilsome. The arrangement illustrated comprises an elongated support 65 to the ends of which are secured, through the agency of nuts, two roller bearings 66 carrying a roller 67. Several of these supports are disposed on the ground at suitable points. The rail resting on these supports is very easy to handle.

What we claim is:

1. A method for replacing railroad rails com prising laying the new rails to form service tracks, carrying rail removing and track preparing devices parallel to the track under replacement, removing the old rails from the track under replacement with the rail removing device, preparing the said track for the new rails and shifting the new rails in place on the said track with the track preparing device.

2. A method for replacing railroad rails com prising laying the new rails to form service tracks, carrying rail removing and track preparing devices parallel to the track under replacement, removing the old rails from the track under replacement through the agency of the rail removing device, laying them on cars running over the latter track ahead of the point of replacement through the agency of the same device, advancing the latter device for continuation of the removal of the old rails, and shifting the new rails in place on the track under replacement.

3. A device for replacing railroad rails including travelling jacks which comprise pairs of wheels adapted to run over a service track the rails of which are on the outside of and parallel to the main track under replacement, jacks supported by these rails, a rigid bar carried by these jacks at an adjustable height over a flat car running on the main track, and rail holding and raising means adapted to run along said bar; a wheeled frame adapted to run over the main track and comprising an outer pair of wheels adapted to run over the wider service track, and means for modifying the vertical position of these outer wheels with reference to the frame; brushing means adapted to run over the service track for brushing the ties of the main track, readzing means adapted to run on the service track and comprising two readzing tools adapted to move together transversely withreference to the track, and means for adjusting the spacing of said tools; a boring device adapted to run over the service track for boring holes in the ties and a preservative applying device adapted to run over the service track and comprising a container for a preservative solution, nozzles for spraying said solution on to the sleeper and brushes at the front of the nozzles for brushing the parts of the ties which are to be impregnated.

. PIERRE CQLLET.

RENE LOISEAU.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3263624 *Apr 22, 1963Aug 2, 1966Matisa Materiel Ind SaMethod and equipment for the laying of railroad tracks
US4274334 *Oct 13, 1978Jun 23, 1981Canron CorporationMachine for changing rails
US4301738 *Oct 22, 1979Nov 24, 1981Franz Plasser Bahnbaumaschinen-Industriegesellschaft M.B.H.Apparatus for the replacement of rails of a track
US4393784 *Dec 18, 1981Jul 19, 1983Franz Plasser Bahnbaumaschinen-Industriegesellschaft M.B.H.Apparatus for replacing rail fastening elements and, optionally, rails
US5331898 *Nov 20, 1992Jul 26, 1994Commissariat A L'energie AtomiqueVehicle for the automatic laying of a track by a vehicle travelling on said track and track designed for installation by such a vehicle
US5385102 *Jan 10, 1994Jan 31, 1995Commissariat A L'energie AtomiqueVehicle for the automatic laying of a track by a vehicle travelling on said track and track designed for installation by such a vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification104/5, 104/2
Cooperative ClassificationE01B29/05