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Publication numberUS1942312 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1934
Filing dateOct 5, 1932
Priority dateOct 5, 1932
Publication numberUS 1942312 A, US 1942312A, US-A-1942312, US1942312 A, US1942312A
InventorsTutoky Stephen M
Original AssigneeTutoky Stephen M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe heel
US 1942312 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

5. M. TUTOKY Jan. 2, 1934.

SHOE HEEL Filed Oct. 5, 1932 Patented Jan. 2, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 1 Claim.

This invention relates to shoe heels, and the invention consists in the provision of what may be termed a spring or cushion heel of strong, durable, and economical construction, and which is especially designed to eliminate shocks and jars to the body while walking, relieve tiredness in prolonged standing, and which will be found especially adapted for wearing during long trips on foot.

The invention, together with its numerous objects and advantages, will be best understood from a study of the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a portion of the shoe having my improved heel applied thereto.

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken substantially on the line 22 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of the fixed section ofthe heel.

Figure 4 is a top plan view of the movable section of the heel.

Figure 5 is a plan View of plate.

With reference more in detail to the drawing, it will be seen that the heel designated generally by the reference character comprises a pair of telescoping sections including an upper or outer section 11, and a lower or inner section 12. Each of said sections comprises a rimmed plate, preferably a metallic plate, and has the same general edge outline as the conventional military heel now commonly used. The plate 12 is slightly smaller than the plate 11 so that the rim of the plate 12 slidably fits within the confines of the rim or flange of the plate 11.

Arranged within the section 12 and secured to the body plate of said section adjacent the rim thereof are a plurality of suitably spaced vertical hooks 13 that are engageable with complemental hooks 14 provided on the body plate of the heel section 11. The hooks 14 are preferably struck out of the body plate of the heel section 11 as will be clear from a study of Figures 2 and 3. With the hooks 13 thus engaging the hooks 14 it will be seen that heel sections 11 and 12 will have a limited movement relative to one another.

A spring device designated generally by the reference character 15 is confined within the heel in a manner to normally expand the heel. Said spring device 15 comprises a body plate 16 that fits within the heel section 12 and has integral or otherwise secured thereto a plurality of spring 55 fingers 17 that engage the body plate of the seca spring equipped tion 11 and serve to normally urge the section 12 outwardly wtih respect to the heel section 11.

In actual practice the section 11 is secured to the shoe, a portion of which is shown in the drawing and designated generally by the reference charatcer 18, by nails or other fastening elements 19 and in the manner suggested in Figure 2. Secured to the underface of the body plate of the section 12 is a lift 20 of leather or other suitable material. The lift 20 may be secured to the section 12 by rivets or in any well known manner.

With the heel thus applied to the shoe it will be apparent that when the weight is supported by the heel, the upper section 11 will be caused to move downwardly, contracting the springs 17,

and as the weight is removed from the heel, the springs 17 will contract to expand the heel, that is to say, as the section 12 of the heel is moved out of engagement with the ground, the latter will be forced outwardly relative to the section 11 upon expansion of the springs 17.

Even though I have herein shown and described the preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is susceptible of further changes, modifications, and improve- 8 ments coming within the scope of the appended claim.

What is claimed is:

A shoe heel of the class described'comprising a pair of flanged plates, the upper one being adapted to be connected to the heel of a shoe and the lower one having its flange fitting in the flange of the upper plate, a plurality of hook members located in the lower member formed by the lower plate and its flange, with portions of said hook members contacting parts of the internal wall of the flange, with the hooks extending inwardly and downwardly, a plurality of hook members connected with the top plate and having shank portions extending downwardly and having their hooks extending upwardly and outwardly and engaging the hooks of the first members, the shanks of the second mentioned hook members forming spaces between themselves and the flange of the lower plate in which space the hooks of the first mentioned hook members slide during movement of one portion of the heel in relation to the other and spring means in the heel for normally holding the parts in a position with the two sets of hook members in contacting relation.

STEPHEN M. TUTOKY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3429545 *Oct 26, 1966Feb 25, 1969Michel RudolphShock absorber for persons
US4680876 *Nov 21, 1984Jul 21, 1987Peng Koh KArticle of footwear
US4709489 *Aug 15, 1985Dec 1, 1987Welter Kenneth FShock absorbing assembly for an athletic shoe
US4881329 *Sep 14, 1988Nov 21, 1989Wilson Sporting Goods Co.Athletic shoe with energy storing spring
US6006449 *Jan 29, 1998Dec 28, 1999Precision Products Group, Inc.Footwear having spring assemblies in the soles thereof
US6115942 *Nov 20, 1997Sep 12, 2000Frederic ParadisFootwear provided with a resilient shock absorbing device
US6665957Oct 18, 2001Dec 23, 2003Shoe Spring, Inc.Fluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US7159338Jan 31, 2005Jan 9, 2007Levert Francis EFluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US7219447Jan 31, 2005May 22, 2007Levert Francis ESpring cushioned shoe
US7334351Jun 7, 2004Feb 26, 2008Energy Management Athletics, LlcShoe apparatus with improved efficiency
US7458172Sep 27, 2004Dec 2, 2008Nike, Inc.Impact attenuating devices and products containing such devices
US7624515May 30, 2006Dec 1, 2009Mizuno CorporationSole structure for a shoe
US7730635Jun 5, 2006Jun 8, 2010Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuation members and products containing such members
US7788824Jun 7, 2005Sep 7, 2010Energy Management Athletics, LlcShoe apparatus with improved efficiency
US7798298Dec 28, 2007Sep 21, 2010Nike, Inc.Impact attenuating and spring elements and products containing such elements
US7979936Oct 24, 2008Jul 19, 2011Nike, Inc.Methods of making impact attenuating devices and products containing such devices
US8146270Apr 2, 2010Apr 3, 2012Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuation members and products containing such members
US8348031Sep 20, 2010Jan 8, 2013Nike, Inc.Impact attenuating and spring elements and products containing such elements
US8555526 *Apr 24, 2012Oct 15, 2013Alexander ElnekavehResilient shoe with pivoting sole
US8650774Feb 23, 2012Feb 18, 2014Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuation members and products containing such members
US8720084Jan 7, 2013May 13, 2014Nike, Inc.Impact attenuating and spring elements and products containing such elements
US8720085Jan 7, 2013May 13, 2014Nike, Inc.Impact attenuating and spring elements and products containing such elements
US20120204442 *Apr 24, 2012Aug 16, 2012Alexander ElnekavehResilient shoe with pivoting sole
WO1995013719A1 *Nov 10, 1994May 26, 1995Engros Schuhhaus AgShoe sole
WO2000074515A1 *Apr 14, 2000Dec 14, 2000Ahrens Hans JoachimShoe and spring-operated dampening system for a shoe
WO2003022087A1 *Sep 5, 2002Mar 20, 2003Thomas D LombardinoArticle of footwear incorporating a shock absorption and energy return assembly
WO2006036721A2 *Sep 22, 2005Apr 6, 2006Nike IncImpact attenuating devices and products containing such devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/38, 36/40
International ClassificationA43B13/18, A43B21/30, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/183, A43B21/30
European ClassificationA43B13/18A2, A43B21/30