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Publication numberUS1943399 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1934
Filing dateFeb 23, 1932
Priority dateFeb 23, 1932
Publication numberUS 1943399 A, US 1943399A, US-A-1943399, US1943399 A, US1943399A
InventorsKenneth Smith
Original AssigneeKenneth Smith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club seal and method of making the same
US 1943399 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 16, 1934. K. SMITH GOLF CLUB SEAL AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed Feb. 23, 1932 I NVE N TO R j/efimef $771277.

ATTORNEYS ill Patented Jan. 16, I934 um'rao srArEs GOLF own scar. m ms'rnon one TEE Kenneth Smith,

r 1 City, Mo.

Application February 23, 1932. Serial No. 594,444

This invention relates to the art of making golf clubs or similar articles where it is desired to produce a neat finish atthe end of a shaft which is usually wrapped with some material affording a better grip to the user.

One of the salient aims of this invention is the provision of a perforated grip for golf clubs, which grip is maintained in sealed relation with the shaft proper by a novelly formed cap created by molding the same directly upon the end of the club whereby to utilize its inherent adhesive qualities and to create a .desirable finish and protecting part that is pleasing in appearance, strong and durable, not likely to become loose or torn away from its fixed position, and will add rather than detract from the appearance of the capped shaft.

A further object of this invention is to provide a method of applying a cap of special material, which method is unique in that it permits the application of a desirable part without changing the form of the grip or shaft; the cap may be molded directly upon the shaft and made as thick as desired by successive applications of the material, all of which effectively seals together the parts of the shaft at the capped end.

A still further object of the instant invention is the contemplation of a golf club structure, wherein is embodied a perforated grip and a molded cap, both of which combine to preclude dislcdgment of either, all to the end of producing a highly desirable piece of golfing equipment.

It is well known in this art that grips for golf club shafts are inclined to tear away from the end of the shaft and unless a suitable seal of some sort is applied, the parting between shaft and wrapping becomes exceptionally objectionable.

Manufacturers of golf clubs have heretofore applied many types of caps, all of which were made separately and applied through the medium of screws, adhesives or other means whereby the cap was secured in place.

in the case of metallic caps, it often became necessary to provide special equipment for crimping the sides of the cap or pressing the same into place. Screw-threaded ferrules have likewise been used and it is one of the main objects of this invention to overcome the objections which accompany all such structures. Toe exact manher of producing a cap in accordance with this method and its novel combination and form. will become apparent through an understanding of the following specification, referring to the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the grip portion of a golf club embodying this invention.

Fig.2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, longitudinal section through the upper portion of said golf club, taken on line 11-11 of Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a cross section through the capped portion of the golf club, and,

Fig. 4 is an end elevation of the same. Themethod of applying and producing the cap must be understood before its relation to the remaining parts of the golf club become apparcut and, since such is true, the preferred manner of creating the cap will first be set down.

While this invention might be applied in capping either wood or steel shafted golf clubs, the 7 same has here been shown to be built into a golf club having the well known steel shaft 6, the grip end of which is closed by a plug 8 which is driven into shaft 6 to a point where it projects therefrom as shown in Fig. 2. The projected portion of plug 3 flares outwardly and produces a head 10, the top 12 of whichrises to an apex 14 by having top 12 formed to present a fiat cone. About shaft 6 is wrapped a filler 16 which may be of paper or fibrous material suitable for the purpose for which it is applied. This filler 16 extends slightly beyond the end of shaft 6 and thereby overlaps the head 10 of plug 8.

Around this filler i6 is placed wrapping 18 that is made of a good grade of soft leather. This wrapping is applied by ailixing a relatively narrow strip of leather as shown in Fig. l, which wrapping l8 terminates just below meeting edge 20 of top 12 and head 10 of plug 8. To create an efiective grip, a plurality of perforations 22 are formed through wrapping 18, thereby to present cavities bottomed by filler 16 or the head it of plug 8 when wrapping 18 is in place. Such aperforated grip not only prevents slipping or turning of the club in the hands of the player,

but also combines with the hereinafter described cap in the making of a unitary structure.

After the parts of the club just mentioned have been assembled in the manner described, cap 24 is produced by dipping the end of the shaft into 10 a solution of pyroxylin. After once dipping to the desired depth, a coating is formed and must be allowed to set before re-dipping to form a superimposed coating whereby the thichiess of cap 24 is increased. Such dipping may be repeated as often as is necessary. After each dipping the club is hung with the dipped end down to allow surplus solution to collect at apex it. This solution forms in a small globule and may be removed by any suitable instrument. After lid the solution has set sufllciently to preclude running, the club is then turned right side up and the small round zone at apex 14 is smoothed before 'the material forming said cap 24 has hardened beyond a point where it may be molded.

Informingcap24inthismanner,therearealso created projections 26 which extend through perforations 22 wherever they underlie skirt 28 of cap 24. This feature securely bonds plug 8. wrapping 18 and cap 24 and positively seals the upper end of the club. The adhesive quality.

of the material forming cap 24 causes an adherence to all parts contacted and there is no possibility of this cap becoming loosened without actually destroying the parts making up the club.

It is notable that the form of the end of the club is not destroyed when applying this unique cap 24. The cap is molded directly upon the end and immediately assumes the contour of the underlying parts. The pleasing bevel 28 that is created by trimming wrapping 18 lends a rounded appearance and feel, and also contributes to eliminate the presence of any sharp edges or bulky shoulders that might interfere in the use of the club. Such a cap blends more thoroughly with the soft feel and appearance of wrapping 18 and by virtue of its toughness, presents a protecting covering that will not burr or scuff to the extent of causing sharp projections to appear.

In making up the solution into which the end of the club is dipped when producing cap 24, it is well to remember that any material such as pyroxylin made up in the majority of a solublegun cotton may be utilized. Such materials may be dissolved in a solution consisting of 50% aceton and 50% amyl acetate. The solution when ready for use should be rather thick or in a semi-liquid condition and therefore the pyroxylin or like material should be thoroughly dissolved by allowing the same to soak for approximately forty-eight (48) hours. slightly warming the solution at the end of this time to prepare it for actual application completely dissolves the material and renders it easy to handle.

Obviously, any pigments might be added to this solution to produce a cap of desired color and the cap may be extended down over as much of wrapping 18 as is thought to be necessary or practical. No equipment other than a container for the solution and means to hang the club is necessary and since the possibilities of this in- It has been found in practice that vention are so far reaching, it is understood that such modifications might be practiced as fairly fall within the spirit 1! the invention and'scope of the appended claims.

( Having thus described the invention, what is claimedasnewanddairedtobesecuredby Letters Patent is:

1. In a golf club, a shaft; a wrapping for the shaft; a plurality of perforations formed through the wrapping; and a cap over the end ofsaidshaftandaporthmofsaidwrapp said cap having integral projections extending through the said perforatltms underlying the cap.

2. In a golf club, a shaft; a wrapping for the shaft; a plurality of perforations formed through the wrapnlnnand a cap over the end of said shaft and a portion of said wrapping said cap having a portion thereof extending through the perforations Making the cap and secured to said shaft.

3. In a golf club, a shaft; a wrapping for the shaft; a plurality of perforations formed through the wrapping; a cap molded over the end of said shaft and a portion of the perforated wrapping having a top wall and an annular skirt integral therewith; and integral projections formed on the inner flee of said skirt extending into the perforations formed in said grip.

4. In a golf club, a shaft having an outwardly flared, frusto-conical head terminating in a flattened cone with its apex disposed onthe longitudinal-central axis of the head; a wrapping for the shaft; and a sealing cap, of plastic material and of substantially uniform thickness throughout, over the end of said shaft and adhering to 11 the exposed surfaces of both shaft and wrapping underlying the same, said cap including a depending annular skirt having an inside diameter at the annular free edge thereof that is appreciably less than the inside diameter thereof at its 115 base. 1

5. In a golf club, a shaft having an outwardly flared head; a wrapping for the shaft; and a sealing cap, of plastic material, of substantially uniform thickness throughout, over the end of 123 said shaft and adhering to the underlying surfaces of both shaft and wrapping, said cap comprising a depending annular skirt having an inside diameter at the annular free edge thereof that is appreciably less than the inside diameter 125 thereof at the base of the skirt.

KENNETH SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2429351 *Jan 1, 1944Oct 21, 1947Frank J Werner JrGolf club
US5000452 *Aug 9, 1989Mar 19, 1991Siegfried KueblerTennis racket, handle cap, and handle grip wrapping
US5248141 *May 8, 1992Sep 28, 1993Kelly David FGrip equalizing golf club grip
US5374059 *Feb 10, 1994Dec 20, 1994Huang; BenShock absorbing grip for racquets and the like
US5618041 *Mar 7, 1996Apr 8, 1997Huang; BenSlip resistant sport grip
US5645501 *Nov 13, 1995Jul 8, 1997Huang; BenGrip construction
US5671923 *Apr 15, 1996Sep 30, 1997Huang; BenGrip for golf shafts
US5730669 *Jan 23, 1997Mar 24, 1998Huang; BenHandle grip and method of making same
US5772524 *Jun 14, 1996Jun 30, 1998Huang; BenWater retarding golf club grip
US5785607 *Jul 25, 1996Jul 28, 1998Huang; BenSpiral cut sleeve-type golf club grip
US5803828 *Jul 16, 1996Sep 8, 1998Huang; BenSlip-on golf club grip
US5813921 *May 16, 1997Sep 29, 1998Huang; BenSleeve-type grip for golf shafts
US5816934 *Feb 25, 1997Oct 6, 1998Huang; BenGolf club grip and method of making same
US5827129 *May 14, 1997Oct 27, 1998Huang; BenGrip for golf club shafts
US5895329 *Feb 26, 1996Apr 20, 1999Huang; BenGolf club shaft grip
US5910054 *Mar 13, 1998Jun 8, 1999Huang; BenGrip for hollow golf club shafts
US6361450 *Feb 4, 2000Mar 26, 2002Ben HuangGolf club shaft grip assembly
US6386989 *Feb 4, 2000May 14, 2002Ben HuangGolf club grip assembly
US6551198 *Aug 13, 2001Apr 22, 2003Ben HuangGolf club grip assembly
US7137904Jun 11, 2002Nov 21, 2006Ben HuangSpiral wrap golf club grip
US7186189Jul 1, 2005Mar 6, 2007Ben HuangPanel grip with modified seam
US7195568Apr 19, 2004Mar 27, 2007Ben HuangGolf club handle grip
US7207892 *Sep 15, 2005Apr 24, 2007Jung-Shih ChangHandle section combination for billiard cue
US7344448Apr 28, 2006Mar 18, 2008Ben HuangGolf club handle grip
US7347792May 22, 2006Mar 25, 2008Ben HuangDecorative golf club grip
US7374498Feb 24, 2004May 20, 2008Ben HuangAll-weather golf club grip
US7404770May 3, 2006Jul 29, 2008Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US7438646May 1, 2006Oct 21, 2008Ben HuangSpiral wrap golf club grip
US7448957May 3, 2006Nov 11, 2008Ben HuangPanel grip with cut-outs and inserts
US7448958May 3, 2006Nov 11, 2008Ben HuangPanel grip with cut-outs and inserts
US7470199Feb 18, 2005Dec 30, 2008Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US7491133May 3, 2006Feb 17, 2009Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US7527564May 18, 2005May 5, 2009Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US7566375May 3, 2006Jul 28, 2009Ben HuangPanel grip with cut-outs and inserts
US7585230Jun 23, 2004Sep 8, 2009Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip with EVA inside layer
US7770321Mar 10, 2008Aug 10, 2010Ben HuangFishing pole grip
US7862445Mar 21, 2007Jan 4, 2011Ben HuangGrip having a stabilized gripping surface
US7862446Aug 14, 2007Jan 4, 2011Ben HuangGrip having a varied gripping surface
US7980961Mar 5, 2007Jul 19, 2011Ben HuangPanel grip with modified seam
US7985314May 19, 2008Jul 26, 2011Ben HuangMethod of making an all-weather grip
US8003171Mar 25, 2008Aug 23, 2011Ben HuangDecorative golf club grip
US8123627Dec 3, 2010Feb 28, 2012Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US8201357Jul 30, 2010Jun 19, 2012Ben HuangFishing pole grip
US8360898Apr 26, 2010Jan 29, 2013Ben HuangGrip
US8424236Apr 2, 2010Apr 23, 2013Ben HuangMulti-layered grip for use with fishing poles
US8435133Jul 28, 2009May 7, 2013Ben HuangPanel grip with cut-outs and inserts
US8480510Aug 24, 2010Jul 9, 2013Ben HuangSleeve member for use in golf club grips and the like
US8499487Jun 18, 2012Aug 6, 2013Ben HuangFishing pole grip
US8518505Apr 2, 2010Aug 27, 2013Ben HuangMulti-layered grip
US8617664Aug 11, 2011Dec 31, 2013Ben HuangMulti-polymer grip member
US8734267Jun 28, 2013May 27, 2014Ben HuangSleeve member for use in golf club grips and the like
USRE37702 *May 19, 2000May 14, 2002Ben HuangGolf club shaft grip
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/302
International ClassificationA63B53/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/14
European ClassificationA63B53/14