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Publication numberUS1945104 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1934
Filing dateJun 12, 1933
Priority dateJun 12, 1933
Publication numberUS 1945104 A, US 1945104A, US-A-1945104, US1945104 A, US1945104A
InventorsDave Zilinsky
Original AssigneeReece Button Hole Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Buttonhole and method of making the same
US 1945104 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 30,

D. ZILINSKY 7 1,945,104 I BUTTONHOLE AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed June l2, 1935 ,Zhvenivr:

Patented Jan. 30, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BUTTONHOLE AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME

Application June 12, 1933. Serial No. 675,336

6 Claims.

aware, been made by hand: an expensive oper-' ation frequently constituting a very considerable part of the entire making cost of the garment. The present invention has for its objects to Simplify and consequently cheapen the formation of such buttonholes and to provide a method and structure in accordance with which the seams by fabric of the garment are completely concealed at the face of the latter while effectively holding the parts in place.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will best be understood from the following description of a preferred mode of carrying the latter into effect, as illustrated in the accompanying drawing. It will be understood, however, that the particular constructions and operations described and shown have been chosen for purposes of exempliflcation merely and that the invention, as defined by the claims hereunto appended, may be otherwise practiced without departure from the spirit and scope thereof.

In said drawing:-

Fig. l is a perspective view showing the initial attachment of the piping fabric to the main or body fabric of the garment.

Fig. 2 is a corresponding transverse section.

Fig. 3 is a sectional perspective view illustrating the slitting of the fabrics.

Fig. 4' is a view of the work after attachment and slitting, looking from the back or reverse side. of the main fabric.

Figs. 5 and 6 are sectional views illustrating the turning of the buttonhole,

Fig. 7 is a sectional perspective view showing the parts after turning.

Fig. 8 is a view of the completed buttonhole, looking from the front or face of the main fabric.

Fig. 9 is a similar view looking from the back or reverse side.

The main or body fabric in which the buttonhole is to be formed is shown at 15, the front or face side thereof being indicated by the numeral 16 and the back or reverse side by the numeral 17. The piping fabric is shown at 18 and is supplied in single pieces of sufficient size to finish individual buttonholes. Each piece is folded over upon itself in opposite directions along two which the piping fabric is secured to the main preferably straight parallel lines 19 intermediate the edges 20 thereof to form two oppositely extending folds or pleats 21, leaving said edges upstanding, as shown in Fig. 1. The folds 21 are secured to the face 16 of the main fabric 15 by two lines of stitching 22 spaced from the edges 19 of said folds and passing through both layers,

of the latter but through only one layer or thick-, ness of the main fabric (Figs. 1 and 2).

The main and piping fabrics are cut' to form 05 registering slits 23 and 24, respectively; of a length corresponding to the length of the desired buttonhole. This slitting may be done prior to, simultaneously with, or subsequent to the stitching of the seams 22. Accurate registration of the slits can be most conveniently assured by slitting the fabrics simultaneously with or subsequent to their attachment/to each other. Preferably the slitting is done, subsequent to the stitching operation, as by means'of a suitable 78 slitting knife 25 conventionally illustrated at 25 in Fi 3.

After the piping fabric has been secured to the main fabric with the slits 23 and 24 in register, the free edges 20 of the piping fabric are folded 80 inwardly and inserted into said slits, as shown in Fig. 5, and the entire piping fabric turned therethrough, as illustrated in Fig. 6, resulting in the structure shown in Fig. 7. This operation results in the formation of intumed portions 26 in the main fabric 15 at the back or reverse side 17 thereof along the edges of the slit 23 therein, which portions are secured to the folds 21 of the piping fabric by the stitches, 22 which pass through both layers of the folds in the piping fabric but through the intumed portions only of the main fabric, leaving the folds projecting slightly beyond the longitudinal edges of the slit 23, as shown in Fig. 8, to constitute the desired piping. As shown most clearly in Fig. 4, the lines of stitching 22 are substantially equal in length to the slits 23 and 24, leaving the end portions 30 of the piping fabric free in order to facilitate the complete turning of said piping-fabric through said slits as described.

Since the stitching 22 passes only through the inturned portions 26 of the main fabric, it is wholly concealed from the face of the main fabric, whose appearance is therefore not marred thereby, and the color and texture of the thread 106 employed is immaterial. Since, however, said stitching passes through both layers of the folds 21, it tends to hold-the body of the piping fabric flat at the back of the m 'n fabric, so that no additional stitching throug the main fabric is no ,2'7 extending transverse to the stitching 22 and required for this purpose. In fact, the stitching 22 is the only stitching necessary, particularly where a lining is employed, but it is preferred to complete the work by additional lines of stitching slit 24 at the ends of the latter, said stitching 27 passing through the piping fabric only (including both layers of the folds 21 therein) and assisting in holding the latter in its desired flat, folded condition.

For convenience and brevity, the term fabric is used herein to designate the materials 15 and 18, but I wish it understood that this expression is not to be taken as limited to textile materials, but that it is intended to include any and all materials, such, for example, as leather, suitable for the purposes in question. I

I claim: 1. A piped buttonhole comprising a main fabric and a piece of piping fabric, said fabrics having registering slits, said main fabric having inturned portions along the edges of the slit therein, and said piping fabric being folded upon itself along two lines at opposite sides of the slit therein, and lines of stitching securing'said fabrics together adjacent the longitudinal edges of the buttonhole, said stitching passing through both layers of the folds in said piping fabric and v through the inturned portions only of said main of the folds in said piping fabric and through the inturned portions only of said main fabric, and otherlines of stitching transverse to said firstnamed lines at the ends of the buttonhole and passing through the piping fabric only.

3. The method of making piped buttonholes which includes folding a piece of piping fabric upon itself along two lines intermediate the edges thereof, stitching the folds so formed to a main fabric, cutting registering slits in the two fabrics between said folds, and turning the piping fabric through said slits.

4. The method of making piped buttonholes which includes folding a piece of piping fabric upon itself along two lines intermediate the edges thereof, securing the folds so formed to a main fabric by stitching through both layers of the folds and one layer only of the main fabric, cutting registering slits in the two fabrics between said folds, and turning the piping fabric through said slits.

5. The method of making piped buttonholes which includes folding a piece of piping fabric upon itself along two lines intermediate the edges thereof, stitching the folds so formed to a main fabric, cutting registering slits in the two fabrics between said folds, and turning the piping fabric and the attached adjacent edges of the main fabric through said slits.

6. The method of making piped buttonholes which includes folding a piece of piping fabric upon itself along two lines intermediate the edges thereof, stitching the folds so formed to a main fabric, cutting registering slits in the two fabrics between said folds, turning the piping fabric through said slits, and sewing lines of stitching crosswise of the slits at the ends of the buttonhole through said piping fabric only.

DAVE ZILINSKY.-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2549294 *Oct 21, 1949Apr 17, 1951De Marco Edward AApparatus for forming buttonholes
US2607308 *May 24, 1950Aug 19, 1952Nunci BufardeciFolder for sewing machines
US2675560 *Sep 29, 1952Apr 20, 1954Nunci BufardeciButtonhole construction
US2676557 *Mar 24, 1950Apr 27, 1954George SilverbergApparatus for making piped or bound edgings
US2713686 *Jan 7, 1953Jul 26, 1955Harold OsterPiped or bound buttonholes in garments and method of making the same
US2767673 *Oct 23, 1952Oct 23, 1956White Sewing Machine CorpMethod of making bound buttonholes
US2780193 *Dec 3, 1953Feb 5, 1957Singer Mfg CoMethods of producing piped garment openings
US2824379 *Oct 20, 1955Feb 25, 1958Sam KatzMarker for making pockets in garments and method of making same
US3451065 *Apr 20, 1967Jun 24, 1969Werner AugustinProcess for making a turnover at a fabric edge or the like,and also ancillary means for carrying out the process
US4489445 *Dec 27, 1983Dec 25, 1984Reece John BMethod and construction of unitary welt and flap for a pocket opening
US5513585 *Jun 17, 1994May 7, 1996Durkopp Adler AktiengesellschaftApparatus for cutting and turning piped openings in cloth workpieces
US6401257 *Jan 3, 2001Jun 11, 2002Souichi TsurutaButtonhole and articles using such a buttonhole
US8065746Aug 24, 2007Nov 29, 2011Capital Mercury Apparel, Ltd.Multi-scored winged collar support
US8065747 *Nov 29, 2011Capital Mercury Apparel, Ltd.Finished slot and adjustable shirt collar and method of manufacturing same
US20060048267 *Oct 24, 2005Mar 9, 2006Jim KeeterFinished slot and adjustable shirt collar and method of manufacturing same
US20080047984 *Aug 24, 2007Feb 28, 2008Capital Mercury Apparel, Ltd.Multi-scored winged collar support
USRE44271 *Feb 23, 2012Jun 11, 2013Capital Mercury Apparel, Ltd.Finished slot and adjustable shirt collar and method of manufacturing same
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/405, 24/659, 112/475.25, 112/424, 112/426, 2/247, 112/425, 112/437, 2/248, 2/265
International ClassificationA41H25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41H25/00
European ClassificationA41H25/00