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Publication numberUS1946321 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1934
Filing dateAug 9, 1933
Priority dateAug 9, 1933
Also published asDE629276C
Publication numberUS 1946321 A, US 1946321A, US-A-1946321, US1946321 A, US1946321A
InventorsHunter Hester W
Original AssigneeHunter Hester W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning device
US 1946321 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 6, 1934. H, vw HUNTER l `1,946,321

" CLEANING DEVICE vFiled Aug. 9. 1953 1*-6 4 t I *Z3 @5 gea "f2.9 j)

@f2/Am Patented Feb. 6, 1934 UNITED STATES .PATENT oFFicE 14 Claims.

My invention relates to an improvement in cleaning devices and has for one purpose the provision of a cleaning element which shall be simple in operation, convenient in use and superior in cleaning efiiciency. Another object is the provision of such an element which shall have a plurality of successively exposable cleaning surfaces, the soiled cleaning surface portions being successively removed, as used, to display beneath a previously covered cleaning surface. It will be understood that thereby the cleaning element is in eifect continually clean, the effective cleaning surface being removed as soon as it has been soiled in use. This is in contrast to the usual method of cleaning by means of an element which is dirty to begin with, as in the case of a broom, brush, mop or the like. Another object is to make unnecessary the usual shaking out or washing of at cleaning element, by providing one of such cheapness that the soiled cleaning portion can be thrown away after use. Another object is the provision, for such a cleaning element or device, of a holding device of such design that it will be easy and convenient for use interchangeably with elements of several kinds of cleaning material for various sorts of surfaces or cleaning jobs. Another object is the provision, at the usual idle end of the handle, of convenient means for securing a cleaning element for use on the end of the handle opposite to that to which the cleaning device or element proper is secured. This produces in effect a supplemental cleaning support, whereby a removable portion from the main cleaning element may be employed for cleaning corners, cracks and the like. Other objects will appear from time to time in the course of the specification and claims.

I illustrate my invention more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawing, where- 1n- Figure l is a perspective View;

Figure 2 is a section along the line 2 2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a section along the line 3 3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a section along the line 4 4 of Figure 3 with the parts in different position;

Figure 5 is a front elevation of a variant form, with parts broken away;

Figure 6 is a section along the line 6 6 of Figure 5; and

Figure 7 is a section along the line 7 7 of Figure 6.

Like parts are indicated by like symbols throughout the specification and drawing.

Whereas my cleaning device or element is the main feature of my invention it is important that the cleaning element proper, herein shown in the form of a roll, be eiiiciently mounted for use and, for ready removal or exchange and for the ready removal of soiled portions, sheets or layers. I

therefore illustrate two variant forms of support of which the form of Figures 5, 6 and 7 is the preferred form, both, however, being practical.

Referring to the drawing, A generally indicates any suitable handle which may be screwthreaded at the lower end, as at A1, or otherwise formed for demountable connection with the head portion A2. While it is shown as demountable it will be understood, of course, that under some circumstances it may be more convenient to form the head portion A2 ,and the handle A integrally and in the claims I have used the term handle as including the head portion A2 and its associated parts, except where the language f the claims clearly indicate to the contrary. This portion A2 includes a stem A2, herein shown as curved in Figures 2 and 4 but which may, if desired, be made straight as in Figure 6 or may be inclined at any desired angle to the member A. The pin or stem A3 passes througha core member B which may, for example, be of wood or fiber or any suitable material, and which is apertured to permit the passage therethrough of the stem A3.

As will appear in Figure 3, the stem A3 is shown as terminating flush with a flattened or cut away portion B1 of the member B. This cut away portion receives a leaf spring B2, through which passes a securing screw B3 penetrating the lower end of the pin A2. A little pin B4 is shown as penetrating the stem A2 and normally tting in a slot B5 in the core B. The slot and pin bear such position in relation to the stem A3 that when they are engaged, as shown in Figures 2 and 3, the base AB is in the proper position for use. The spring B2 normally tends to draw down the stem A3 and to hold the pin B4 engaged in the slot B5. However, it is possible to press downwardly on the core or to pull upwardly on the handle A and thus disengage the pin B4 from the slot B5 andpermit a rotation of the core B in relation to the members A and A2.

Surrounding the core B is a relatively soft or yielding coating C which may be of soft or ber felt, padded cloth, sponge rubber or the like. Preferably the edge of this material extends beyond the end of the base B, so that the hard base will not contact the furniture, walls or the like, which are being mopped. Surrounding the soft intermediate C, I illustrate the cleaning member or element proper, C1, which is the primary element of my invention. It may for example be in the form of a roll of paper or a roll or bundle of any other suitable material. The roll C1 mayv easily be applied to or removed from the handle by merely removing the base B from the stem A3, which can be done by detaching the screw B3. The stem A3 is then slipped out and the base B ls slipped into the refill C1 and the parts reassembled. It will be noted that the roll or rell C1 is slotted or apertured, at opposite side of its center, as at C2, to permit the threading in of the stem A2 and the securing of the parts together. If the roll C1 is formed of soft or crinkly fiber or paper, as may frequently be the case, it may be diiicult to thread it over the layer C of ber, sponge rubber or the like. Therefore, I may provide any suitable intermediate layer of smoother material, for application either to the exterior of the member C or to the interior of the roll C1, whereby the two may readily be given relative movement without undue frictional resistance. I illustrate for example, the layer or layers of smooth material C20, which may be positioned within the roll C1. If desired, they may be removed after the roll is applied, but under ordinary circumstances this is not necessary. I illustrate in Figures 5 and 6 an interior smooth; layer G20 corresponding to the layer C20 of Figure 3.

In order to hold the roll from unrolling, I provide a clamping member including the clamps proper D and the connecting yoke D1, which is apertured as at D2 to permit the passage'of the stem A2. D3 are any suitable finger or handle pieces. D4 is a spring compressed between the saddle portion D1 and the member A2 whereby the clamps are normally 'thrust against the roll or refill C1.

Referring to the form of Figures 5, 6 and '7, the stem A3 is illustrated as straight, and as screwthreaded into a socket E on a relatively thin transverse body portion E1. Mounted upon the member E1 are cushions E2 of felt, rubber or the like, the cushion portion being, if desired, of one piece or for convenience of application, in two pieces.

G indicates the cleaning element proper, which may be mounted upon the member ofv members E2. It will be understood that in order to thread the member G, it is necessary to unscrew the stem A2 from the socket and remove it. I have illustrated the members E2 and G as being noncircular in form but as having two faces which` may alternately be applied to the iioor, wall or the like which is being cleaned, by merely rotating the handle A, and thus the mop member, through anarc of 180. It is a form which makes it easy to penetrate corners, as will be clear from its section as shown in Figure 6. The rolling is prevented from unrolling, as in the forms of Figure 1 and following, by the clamp D. It will be noted also that whereas the stem A3 in the rst form is shown as circular in cross section, in the form of Figures 5, 6 and 7, it is shown as squared or noncircular, conforming to a squared hole in the stirrup D1 whereby the clamps D are held against rotation in relation to the stem A2.

As shown in Figure l the handle A may be forked at the end as at A20 to permit the insertion therein of a sheet of paper or lthe like which will serve as a cleaning member or element when it is desired to clean along a crack or corner. The sheet or paper or fiber employed may readily be removed from the roll C1 or G, although of course I do not wish to limit myself to such source for the use of the paper. However, it will form a very convenient source. I illustrate in Figure 1, a paper sheet A21 in position ready for use.4

It will be realized that Whereas I have described and shown a practical and operative device, nevertheless many changes may be made in size, shape, number and disposition of parts without departing from the spirit of my invention. I, therefore, wish my drawing and description to be taken as in a broad sense illustrative or diagrammatic, rather than as limiting me to my precise showing herein. It will be understood, in particular, that whereas I have shown practical means for supporting my cleaning element and for preventing unintended removal of its surface layer, while permitting ready removal when intended, many variant forms of support might be employed.

It will be realized that I employ the term roll in a broad sense and do not wish it to be limited to any specific cross section. The roll may be circular as in one of the forms shown herein, and as non-circular as in another of the forms. The roll may be continuous or discontinuous, that is to say, formed of a single roll sheet, or formed of a plurality of separate sheets.

rllhe use and operation of my invention are as follows:

My cleaning element or member, such as the roll C1 or G, presents at all times a clean outer surface to the member, wall or the like to be cleaned. Assume that the user starts with a new roll. She mounts it on whatever handle or base is employed and then begins to clean. Of course the outer surface is initially clean. In using the form of handle of Figures 5, 6 and 7, the user may first employ one of the inclined faces of the member G. When that becomes soiled or when a fresh wall space is approached, the user can turn the handle around and employ the other face which is still clean. If working in a corner the more or less angular junction between the two faces may be employed. Or, if a still narrower or more restricted space must be penetrated, the end of the handle A may be employed with its slot A20 or any other suitable holding means, and the sheet A21. The user can very readily remove a clean sheet from the roll C1 or G for use in the slot A20.

When a sufficient area has been cleaned or a sulciently dirty area has been cleaned to soil the exterior of the roll C1 or G, and to soil all sides of it which have been employed, by rotation of either the handle or the base, then the operator can pull up on the members D3 thus lifting the clamp from the loose edge of the roll C1 or G. When the loose edge has been released the clamp has dropped back to its initial position, un'der pressure of the spring Dl1 and the operator removes the dirty section. The clamp then serves as a cutting element to guide the tear of the dirty section and to keep the ensuing clean section from being torn off. The result is the exposure of a clean fresh surface, ready for more cleaning.

As the roll G or C1 is backed by a soft or more or less yielding body, such as C or E2, there is no scratching of theroll on the wall or furniture.

This is advantageous as preventing injury to the surface. It is also helpful in cleaning over surfaces having more or less irregularity of contour, as the yielding base C or E2 permits the rcll G or C1 more or less to flow into the hollows ofthe contour and to recede before the elevations.

In this use it will be clear that my cleaning element is vastly superior to the conventional cleaner or mop of cloth, rope, wool or the like, which rapidly becomes soiled and which is not readily replaced.

Considering in detail the form of Figures l to 4 inclusive, and assuming that the operator has threaded on one of the cleaning members C1 and 145 not actually roll or movev on the base B, but the surface exposed can be altered by merely rotating the whole body B, and the roll C1 with it, in relation to the handle, thus exposing a different arc to the oor. Or the operator can rotate the handle A through an angle of 180 and thus expose still a different arc to the iioor. The roll may be perforated, if necessary, but under ordinary circumstances, perforation of the roll along the line of tear may be dispensed with.

In the use of the device, it must be understood that diierent types of material may be employed for different purposes or that diierent lengths of roll may be employed. It is in the main useful that the inner hard core be surrounded by a softer laye'r of material and that the mop proper, consisting of a roll of paper or the like engage this soft material and also extend at the ends not only beyond the inner hard core but beyond the soft material whereby no part of the mop will cause any scouring or scratching of the surfaces cleaned. Also, only a removable mop surface should be used, with the inner softer layer at all times protected or covered.

As above referred to, if a given portion A21 of the roll element C1 or G is detached, wadded up and thrust up into the notch or holder A20, a convenient means is provided for a more thorough cleaning of such comparatively diflicult parts as corners, edges of the floor Where it meets the baseboard, curves in the baseboard itself, spaces around and under the legs of furniture, and cle-I pressions in moreor less intricate moldings on wall or ceiling. It will be realized that whereas I have shown simply a notch any other suitable securing means may be employed for using a sheet or wad of material at the outer end of the handle A.

I claim: Y

1. In a cleaning element, a roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetrating the roll from outside to inside the roll,

2. In a cleaning element, a roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetratingthe roll from outside to inside the roll, said' roll having also a longitudinal aperture' penetrated by said first mentioned aperture.

3. In a cleaning element, a roll of cleaning material containing a longitudinal aperture extending from end to end of the roll and a transverse aperture extending from side to side of the roll and in communication with said longitudinal aperture.

4. In a cleaning element, a roll of cleaning material containing a longitudinal aperture and a transverse aperture extending diametrically through the roll and intersecting the longitudinal aperture.

5. In a cleaning element, a roll of cleaning ma.- terial containing a tranverse aperture extending from side to side through the roll.

6. In a cleaning element, a roll of cleaning material containing an axial central aperture, and a transverse aperture extending from side to side through the roll and in communication with said axial central aperture- 7. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetrating from outside to inside of the roll and a handle for said cleaning device and a support for said roll positioned within the roll, and a connection between said handle and said support, said onnection passing through said transverse aperure.

8. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetrating from outside to inside of the roll and a handle for said cleaning device penetrating said aperture, said roll having also an axial aperture, a roll support in said axial aperture and a connection between said handle and said support.

9. In a cleaning device, a hollow open ended roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetrating said material from outside to inside of the roll, a roll support within said`roll and removable therefrom through theopen end thereof and having a handle attaching portion aligned with said aperture, and a handle for said cleaning device including a portion adapted to penetrate the aperture in the roll, and a supporting connection between said penetrating portion of the handle and the roll support.

10. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning Ina-- terial containing a transverse aperture penetrating from outside to inside of the roll, a roll support within said roll, said roll having an axial aperture in which said roll support is positioned, a handle penetrating said transverse aperture and in supporting relationship with said roll supin@ port, and means, associated with said handley for preventing unintended unrolling of the roll, including a thrust member and yielding means for urging it against the roll.

11. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetrating from outside to inside of the roll, a roll support within said roll, said roll having an axial aperture in which said roll support is positioned,

a handle penetrating said transverse aperture i and in supporting relationship with said roll support, and means, associated with said handle for preventing unintended unrolling of the roll, said means including a clamp, mounted upon the handle, and means, associated with the handle for thrusting it against said roll.y

12. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetrating from outside to inside of the roll, a roll support within said roll, said roll having an axial aperture in which said roll support is positioned,

a handle and a supporting connection between said handle and said roll support, penetrating said aperture in the roll, and a layer of material smoother than said roll, interposed between the material of the roll and the roll support.

13. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetrating from outside to inside of the roll, a roll support within said roll, said roll having an axial aperture in which said roll support is positioned, a handle, and a supporting connection between said handle and said roll support, penetrating said aperture in the roll, and means for holding said roll support against-rotation in relation to said handle.

14. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material containing a transverse aperture penetrating from outside to inside of the roll, a roll support within said roll, said roll havingan axial 14o aperture in which said roll support is positioned,

a handle, and a supporting connection between said handle and said roll support, penetrating said aperture in the roll, and means for holding said roll support against rotation in relation to said handle, and means for preventing said roll from unrolling.

HESTER w.- HUNTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423962 *Jan 1, 1944Jul 15, 1947Clark Homer TLint remover
US2459392 *Jul 17, 1945Jan 18, 1949Augustine PowerStippler
US2548331 *Apr 9, 1948Apr 10, 1951Kameo YamashiroWashing apparatus for automobiles and the like
US2859463 *Feb 13, 1956Nov 11, 1958Joseph HirschWindow cleaning implement
US6298517 *Jun 12, 1998Oct 9, 2001Mckay William D.Cleaning tool with removable cleaning sheets
US6810554Nov 16, 2001Nov 2, 2004Rapid Brands CorporationCleaning tool with removable cleaning sheets
US7350257Aug 9, 2003Apr 1, 2008Rapid Brands CorporationCleaning tool with removable cleaning sheets
EP0938863A2 *Feb 25, 1999Sep 1, 1999Aaro HeinonenCleaning device, cleaning cloth and method of cleaning
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/228, 15/231
International ClassificationA47L13/20, A47L13/24
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/24
European ClassificationA47L13/24