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Publication numberUS1946690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1934
Filing dateFeb 28, 1931
Priority dateFeb 28, 1931
Publication numberUS 1946690 A, US 1946690A, US-A-1946690, US1946690 A, US1946690A
InventorsHaines George D
Original AssigneePorcelain Tile Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tiled construction
US 1946690 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 13, 1934. Q DHA|NE5 TILED CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 28, 1931 n llllll val.

,IIII- r Il!!! a: n m0 o omuo 0 Olli Patented Feb. 13, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TILED CONSTRUCTION Application February 28, 1931. Serial No. 518,977

5 Claims.

In my Patents Nos. 1,594,614 and 1,686,812, dated August 3, 1926, and October 9, 1928 respectively, there is disclosed a type of tiled construction comprising a suitable structural support, a foundation sheet secured to the support, and a multiplicity of vitreous-enameled sheet-metal tiles secured to the foundation sheet. The foundaticn sheet particularly described in said patents is of fibrous or mineral material. While foundation sheets of such material are entirely satisfactory in many situations, there are other situations where a metallic foundation sheet would be highly desirable, and it is one of the objects of the present invention to provide a metallic foundation sheet adapted for attachment to a substructure and arranged to be covered with tiles.

Another object of this invention is to provide a type of construction wherein sound-deadening and heat-insulating properties are combined with the desirable qualities inherent in a metallic foundation sheet.

Another object is to embody, in a foundation sheet of metallic or composite construction, guid ance-formations to facilitate the application of tiles thereto with a Vminimum of skill and care on the part of the workman.

Another object is to reduce the cost of foundation sheets.

The foregoing objects, and others vancillary thereto, are attained by means of the exemplary constructions shown in the accompanying drawing, wherein Figure l is an elevation showing a metallic foundation sheet partially covered with tiles.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary face view of the form of foundation sheet shown in Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken in the plane of dotted line 3 3 of Fig. l.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view of a composite foundation sheet, showing tiles applied thereto.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary face view of the form of foundation sheet illustrated in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view of another form of metallic foundation sheet, with tiles applied thereto.

Fig. 7 is a perspective View of a form of tile adapted for attachment to the form of foundation sheet represented in Fig. 6.

The supporting structure or wall which is to be provided with a tiled surface may be of any desired construction, as, for example, brick, tile, concrete or frame. In the case of a room that is being remodeled or modernized, the plastered walls would constitute the supporting structure.

(Cl. Y2-19) In Fig. l I have indicated a vertical wooden stud 1 constituting part of the ordinary framework of a wall or partition.

The form of foundation sheet illustrated in Figs. l, 2, and 3 is a flat metallic sheet 2. The vertical dimension of the sheet is preferably a multiple of the width of a tile, plus suitable a1- lowance for the grout or pointing material between adjacent'tiles. The horizontal dimension of the sheet may be approximately a multiple of sixteen inches, the usual spacing of the studs 1. Lugs 3 are struck up from the sheet 2 to assist in holding the tiles in place and to guide the workman in positioning the tiles in proper alinement. The lugs 3 may be of any desired number and spacing.

The tiles are preferably of the general type disclosed in said Patents Nos. 1,594,614 and 1,686,812, i. e., each tile consists of a sheet-metal plate 4 having integral marginal flanges 5, the outer face of the plate and the flanges being coated with vitreous enamel. The tiles may be oblong, square or of any other suitableshape. They may be of conventional size, as 3 x 6, or 41/2 X 41/2, or of any other desired dimensions. If intended for application to exterior walls they may be and preferably are of relatively large size.

As will be apparent from Figs. 2 and 3, the lugs 3 are so arranged upon the sheet 2 as to fit within the anges 5 of the tiles and thus serve to locate the tiles in proper vertical and horizontal alinement. The lugs 3 for each tile are spaced away from the lugs for adjacent tiles so as to leave spaces between adjoining tiles for the reception of pointing material 6.

If desired, one or more lugs 7 may be struck up from the sheet 2 to support the central portion of each tile.

The foundation sheet may be attached to the substructure in any preferred way, as by means of nails 8 extending through holes 9 formed in the sheet.

In erecting a tiled structure embodying the construction illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, and 3, the foundation sheet 2 is secured to the wall or other support, and a coat of cement mortar 10 is applied to the sheet. The layer of mortar may be of any desired thickness that will leave the lugs 3 sufliciently exposed for the guidance of the workman. While the mortar is moist, the work-- man sets the tiles in the positions indicated by the lugs 3. Some of the mortar flows through the holes 9 as well as the other openings produced when the lugs 3 and 7 are formed and forms keys 11. After the tiles have been applied -1 cured to the substructure.

they are pointed, as represented at 6 in Fig. 3, any surplus of mortar being wiped from the joints between the tiles.

Fig. 4 illustrates a composite foundation sheet 12 consisting of a metallic sheet 13 having a facing 14 of gypsum or other suitable material applied thereto at the factory as distinguished rom the coating of mortar 10 applied in the course of the erection of the tiled surface shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 3. The facing 14 is interrupted by grooves 15 (Fig. 5) for the reception of the fianges of the tiles, the grooves being further defined, if desired, by lugs 16 struck up from the sheet 13.

The composite foundation sheet 12 may be attached to the substructure in any preferred manner, as, for example, by means of nails driven through openings 17 formed in the sheet 13 at the intersections of the grooves 15.

in constructing a tiled surface embodying the composite foundation sheet illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5, the composite sheet is secured to the supporting structure, after which the tiles 4 are applied to the sheet and caused to adhere thereto by means of a coating 18 (Fig. 4) of cement; or the tiles may be applied at the factory where the foundation sheet is fabricated. |Ihe last step is the pointing of the tiles, as indicated at 6 in Fig. 4.

In lieu of or in addition to the use of cementitious material for attaching the tiles to the foundation sheet, a mechanical connection may be employed by providing tiles 4a with marginal prongs 22, as indicated in Fig. '7, said prongs being adapted to extend through slots or other perforations 23 in the metallic sheet and be clenched at the rear side of the sheet, as shown in Fig. 6, 24 is a layer of mineral material filling the space between the sheet and the tiles 4a.

It will be evident that the metallic sheet (which may, if desired, be rust-proofed in any preferred manner) is not subject to shrinkage or deterioration due to atmospheric conditions, and hence is particularly well adapted for use in such places as subways, tunnels and other underground construction. The mortar or gypsum facing, by deadening sound and insulating against heat, obviates the objections incident to all-metal construction.

The construction disclosed in the before-mentioned patents is especially useful in tiling relatively small and irregular surfaces, as the character of foundation sheet therein shown may be readily cut to fit around door jambs, window frames, projecting window sills, internal and external corners and the like, and thus tailored to the walls before the tiles are set; Whereas the foundation sheets herein described are particularly adapted to places where relatively large areas are to be tiled, as in the case of exterior walls, corridors, tunnel Walls and the like, since the amount of hand-Work (and particularly the amount of hand-work required to be done on the job) may be reduced by attaching the tiles to the foundation sheets before the latter are se- The construction herein shown is also Well adapted to the mass production of duplicate tiled panels designed for incorporation into refrigerators, counter fronts, re place fronts, etc.

It will be noted that in all the forms of foundation sheets herein disclosed there are rows of guidance-formations or tile-locating formations which coaot with the tiles to permit of positioning the latter in correct alinernent with a minimum of attention and skill on the part of the workman.

Although I have described the improved foundation sheets as being used with sheet-metal tiles, it should be understood that certain features of the invention are susceptible of use in connection with tiles of other materials,

I claim as my invention:

1. The combination of a metallic foundation sheet having rows of tile-locating formations, a multiplicity of sheet-metal tiles secured to the sheet, each tile having marginal formations that coaot with the tile-locating formations of the sheet to position the tiles in correct alinement, and a sound-deadening and heat-insulating mineral facing for said sheet beneath the tiles.

2. The combination of a metallic foundation sheet having rows of tile-locating formations, a multiplicity of sheet-metal tiles secured to the sheet and spaced apart from one another, each tile having marginal formations that coact with the tile-locating formations of the sheet to position the tiles in correct alinernent and spacing, a sound-deadening and heat-insulating mineral facing for said sheet filling the spaces beneath the tiles, and pointing material in the spaces between adjacent tiles.

3. The combination of a metallic foundation sheet having openings therein, flanged sheetmetal tiles having prongs extending through said openings and clenched on the rear side of the sheet, and a mineral filling the space between the sheet and the tiles.

4. A tiled wall consisting of a substructure, a metallic sheet secured to said substructure, said sheet having lugs struck up therefrom, whereby openings are formed in the sheet, said lugs dening spaces to receive tiles, a multiplicity of tiles the edges of which coaot with said lugs to position the tiles in said spaces in correct alinement and spaced relation, mortar securing said tiles to the sheet, said mortar extending through said openings in the form of keys, and pointing material in the spaces between adjacent tiles.

5. A tiled wall consisting of a substructure, a metallic sheet secured to said substructure, said sheet having lugs struck up therefrom, whereby openings are formed in the sheet, said lugs dening spaces to receive tiles, a multiplicity of tiles the edges of which coaot with said lugs to position the tiles in said spaces in correct alinement and spaced relation, a plurality of lugs struck up from said sheet in each of the tilereceiving spaces dened by the first mentioned lugs to bear against the backs of the tiles, mortar securing said tiles to the sheet, said mortar extending through said openings in the form of keys, and pointing material in the spaces between adjacent tiles.

GEORGE D. HAINES.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/386, 52/415, 52/390
International ClassificationE04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0801
European ClassificationE04F13/08B