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Publication numberUS1948014 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 20, 1934
Filing dateMar 20, 1933
Priority dateMar 20, 1933
Publication numberUS 1948014 A, US 1948014A, US-A-1948014, US1948014 A, US1948014A
InventorsTuttle Florence K
Original AssigneeTuttle Florence K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lingerie drier
US 1948014 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 20, 1934. TUTTLE; 1,948,014

LINGERIE DRIER Filed March 20, 1933 INVENTOR. 2 /arence/(, 7T/f/ e /A TTORNEYS.

Patented Feb. 20, 1934 LINGERIE DRIER Florence K. Tuttle, San Francisco, Calif. Application March 20, 1933. Serial No. 661,708

7 Claims.

. This invention relates to clothes-drying racks and has for its principal object a small portable foldable rack especially adaptable for drying lingerie, stockings, and other light articles of wearing apparel frequently washed out in the hand basin and dried around the room.

Other objects and features of advantage will appear in the following description and accompanying drawing.

In the drawing Fig. 1 is a side view of the rack in folded position.

' Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the rack with the drying arms outfolded and broken in length to bring them within the drawing, as seen from the line 22 of Fig. 3. I

Fig. 3 is a reduced size bottom plan view of the rack with arms outfolded and a cord stretched around at the ends of the arms. I

Fig. 4 is an enlarged detail of one of the arms.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary section of Fig. 3 as seen from the line 55thereof showing the detents for holding the arms properly spaced.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged detail of the swivel joint of the suspension rod shown on optional variation. Fig. '7 is an elevation showing a hook upon which my improved rack may be suspended.

Fig. 8 is an elevation showing my rack hung on the upper edge of a door.

Briefly described, my improved rack consists of a horizontal hub member 1 to which a lot of arms or rods 2 are vertically pivoted at one end as by rivets 3 passing through eyes formed on the rods. The rods may be of any length, but about a foot long has been found convenient for ordinary use of a woman traveling or about a hotel. The hub 1 is made of several superimposed sheet metal plates and is preferably of clover-leaf form as shown in Fig. 1 with the arms so pivoted about it that they will all fold to project substantially parallel toward one side as indicated. Therods are pivoted at different elevations between theplates so that a large number may be used and yet they will all fold without interference and each rivet will pass through three rods. The hub plates are preferably of thin steel suitably plated to resist rust, and they are preferably indented as indicated at 4 so that the rods will snap into place for proper radial spacing when outfolded'to form a complete circle as shown in Fig. 3.

Extending vertically from the center of the hub is a suspension rod 5 formed with a loop 6 on its upper end and a downwardly directed point 7 so that the device may be suspended from the loop from any convenient support such as the chandelier of a room, shower bar of a bath room,

7 pin 14 to fold along the folded arms.

curtain fixture, or a specially provided wall hook as shown at 8 in Fig. 7 and which is provided with a wall attaching plate 9 'and an arm 10 extending outwardly far enough to suspend the rack free of the wall. Or if desired the point '7 of the suspension rod may be impinged on the upper edge of a door 11 to suspend the rack, but in such case some of the arms would have to be swung forward on account of the door interference, as to obtain'the.

full capacity of the rack it must hang clear in the room. i

The suspension rod is swivelly connected to the hub so that the rack arms may be rotated about it to take off or put on the items for drying, and to this end it has a tight washer at 12 above the hub and a washer 13 below and is headed over against the lower washer yet without binding the same against the hub. Just above the hub'the rod is forked as at 14 and horizontally fpivote'd as at 14' so that it may be swung downwardly on The pivotal joint of the suspension rod thus provided-would permit the device to tip if heavily loaded on one side only, and to avoid this I lock the pivotal joint of the suspension rod by means of a loose collar 15 which drops down over both aligned ends of the rod and holds them rigid.

Suspension rod 5 is made more serviceable by flattening out for a distance as at 16 which acts as a stop against too great movement of collar 15 while at the same time providing a fine place for impressing the name of its maker, owner, patent number, or other data.

In place of forking the ends of the suspension rod for the folding joint as explained they may be simply cut to the center as shown in Fig. 6 and which is perhaps a trifle stronger.

A feature of my improved rack not thus far explained is the bifurcated outer ends 17 of the rods which permits of a string 18 being passed around all of the arms and tied to thus provide 1 nine short runs of line from which articles may be suspended for drying.

It might be mentioned that the loop end 6 of the suspension rod is adapted for hooking over a door knob for suspending the rack for drying short articles, but this will necessitate swinging some of the arms formed to clear the door.

Having thus described my invention it will be seen to be adaptable to all the varying requirements of a traveler or hotel and apartment house dweller, and will even be found very useful about a well equipped home in saving the effort of going to the laundry with every little thing to be washed and dried, and while I am aware of many forms of towel racks with swinging arms, I do not know of any having the general utility of the improved rack shown in the drawing and described herein, and I therefore claim:-

1. A foldable drying rack comprising a hub, a plurality of arms pivoted thereto and arranged to outfold from a position all at one side of the hub to radial positions therearound, a suspension rod at one side of the hub extending substantially at right angles to the plane of the outfolded arms, means adapting said rod to fold down substantially to the plane of the arms, and means looking said rod rigid when outfolded.

2. A foldable drying rack comprising a hub, a plurality of arms pivoted thereto and arranged to outfold from a position all at one side of the hub to radial positions therearound, a suspension rod at one side of the hub extending substantially at right angles to the plane of the outfolded arms, a pivot joint adapting said rod to fold down substantially to the plane of the arms, and a slidable collar on said rod locking said rod rigid when outfolded.

3. A foldable drying rack comprising a hub, a plurality of arms pivoted thereto and arranged tooutfold' from a position all at one side of the hub to radial positions therearound, and a suspension rod at one side of the hub extending substantially at right angles to the plane of the out folded arms, said hub comprising a plurality of thin metal plates between which the arms are pivoted one above the other and the arms each being adapted to swing on its pivot independently of the arm above or below it.

4. A- clothes drying rack comprising a hub provided with a plurality of radially projecting arms pivoted at one end thereto so as to fold in a bunch to one side, and a suspension rod on said hub swivelly secured thereto to permit revolving of therack, said rod provided with a loop for suspending it from above, said hub comprising a plurality of thin metal plates between which the arms are pivoted, and the plates formed with detents to space the arms about the hub in outfolded position and to releasably secure each of the arms against movement about its pivot in either direction, said detents being relatively shallow to permit movement therepast upon application of a slight lateral pressure on each of said arms.

5, A foldable drying rack comprising a hub, a plurality of arms pivoted thereto and arranged to outfcld from a position all at one side of the hub to radial positions in a horizontal plane therearound, a suspension rod at one side of the hub extending upwardly substantially at right angles to the plane of the outfolded arms, a pivot joint adapting said rod to fold down substantially to the plane of the arms, and a slidable collar on said rod locking said rod rigid when outfolded, and means providing a stop for said collar when it is in locking position.

6. A foldable drying rack comprising a hub, a plurality of arms pivoted to said hub around the central axis thereof at points substantially equal- 1y spaced from each other and from the central axis of said hub, said arms arranged and adapted to outfold from a position all at one side of the hub with their outer ends together to radial positions therearound and a suspension rod at one side of the hub extending substantially at right angles to the plane of the outfolded arms.

'7. A clothes drying rack comprising a flat hub generally triangular in shape with a plurality of arms pivoted to the hub at three points substantially equally spaced from each other and from the central axis of said hub, a suspension rod extending from said hub co-axial with the central axis thereof, said arms arranged and adapted to outfold from a position all at one side of the hub with their outer ends together to spaced positions at one side of the hub or to radial positions therearound as desired, one of the sides of said hub being adapted to engage against the side of a wall to prevent the hub from turning when said hub is suspended adjacent a wall and the arms are disposed in spaced relation at one side of said hub.

FLORENCE K. TUTTLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2650717 *Oct 5, 1948Sep 1, 1953Larson Charles ODisplay stand
US3179256 *Feb 10, 1964Apr 20, 1965Clem UnderwoodSupporting bracket for multiple clothes hangers
US3872973 *Jul 23, 1973Mar 25, 1975Duncan Thomas WRack system for neckties or the like
US4858867 *May 18, 1988Aug 22, 1989Samsonite CorporationGarment bag support hook
US6425490 *Jan 21, 2000Jul 30, 2002Thien Q. TaSpiral tie and accessory rack with stacked pole segments
US6808078 *Jul 29, 2002Oct 26, 2004Thien Q. TaSpiral tie and accessory rack with stacked pole segments
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/115, 211/96, 211/118
International ClassificationD06F57/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F57/00
European ClassificationD06F57/00