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Publication numberUS1948537 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1934
Filing dateDec 16, 1929
Priority dateDec 19, 1928
Publication numberUS 1948537 A, US 1948537A, US-A-1948537, US1948537 A, US1948537A
InventorsGustav Noack Walter
Original AssigneeBbc Brown Boveri & Cie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Steam generator
US 1948537 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb-.27, 1934. A w G. NoAcK 1,948,537

STEAM GENERATOR Filed Dec. 16. 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 30 W8 Nouk 32M @Memup www WMM W. G. NOACK STEAM GENERATOR Feb. 27', 1934.

Filed Dec. 16l 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 mi n NN YW En O MGM 1W. 5A .mhh

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vParental Feb. 27, 1934 infissi l.,9ll8,537

STEAM GENERATOR Walter Gustav Noack,

signor to Aktiengesellschaft Brown` Boveri Baden, Switzerland, as-

Cie, Baden, Switzerland, a joint-stock company of Switzerland Application December i6, 1929, Serial No. ilhlt,

and in Germany December i9, 1923 ll Claims..

This invention relates to steam generators and is a continuation in part of my copending applications S. No. 333,453 fled January ith, i923,

S. NO. 343,745 iiled March lst, i929, S. No.`

343,746 iiled March ist, i929 and S. No. 375,133 iiled July 1st, 1929. Amongthe objects of the in venton is the provision of a novel steam genern ator of the continuous combustion type, in which the combustion mixture is burned under `high pressure, and. the pressure is utilized to discharge the combustion gases at high velocity along heat exchanger surfaces holding a steam generating uid, thereby securing higher eiliciency, economy in construction, space and operation, and better control.

The invention will be best understood from the following description of exemplifications thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawm ings wherein,

Fig. l is a diagrammatic view ot a boiler sys tern exemplifying one .form oi the invention;

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view of a boiler sysM tern embodying another 'form of the invention;

Fig. 3 is a detail sectional view oi a portion. of the boiler unit of Fig. 2 illustrating the arrangernent of the water tubes and ci the gas discharge tubes;

Fig. ll is a horizontal sectional detail View through the boiler oi Fig. 2 along line liV-li oi Fig. 2;

Figs. 5 and 6 are horizontal sectional views through the water tubes and gas discharge tubes of boiler unit. such as shown in Fig. 2, illustratn ing modified construction` details;

Fig. 7 is an elevational view of a gas discharge tube of boiler as shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a horizontal sectional view of one end of the gas discharge tube of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a view similar' to Fig. 3 oi the other end ofthe gas discharge tube of Fig. '7.

In my prior1 applications referred to above, l have described novel steam generators in which a combustible mixture was delivered to a closed combustion chamber and there subjected to explosion-like combustion, like in explosion type combustion engines, the pressure increase produced by the explosion combustion being utilized to impart to the .gases a very high Velocity near the sound velocity along heat exchange surfaces for vaporizing Water circulated thereacross. In the preferred type of steam generatorof the present invention, a combustible charge is continuously supplied under raised pressure to a pressure-proof combustion chamber, and therein subjected to continuous combustion, the pressure in the combustion chamber being applied to inipart to the combustion gases a similar high velocity through heater tubes of a heat exchanger for heating a steam generating fluid.

In accordance with the invention the pres it@ sure conditions in the combustion chamber, the dimensions or the gas discharge tubes, and the entire system of the boiler are so designed and chosen as to cause the gases oi combustion to stream adjacent the heat exchange surfaces cr boiler tubes, with a velocity near 300 meters per second or more. in order to impart to the combustion gases this velocity, a certain pressure drop must taire place in the discharge conduits. that is. the pressure within the combusliti tion chamber must be a multiple oi' the pres sure in the flue or exhaust. lli? the loss oi pres-n sure on account ci tube iriction and the other factors governing the operation are taken into consideration. and it in addition, the lower value of the Velocity oi? the combustion gases is talren' as about 200 meters per second, there is ob tained the value approximately ifi as a minimum pressure ratio. ior which the above described higher rate of heat transmission will taire place, although `favorableV results will. be obtained even with ratios which are somewhat smaller.

To secure such conditions, the continuous combustion boilers oi my invention have the combustion carried out in a pressure tight chamber, such as is used, for example, in constant 'pressure gas turbines, and the combustion air and the iuel are supplied to thechamber under pressure, as by a compressor. The combustion gases are oi increased pressure, and are discharged from. the it@ combustion chamber, through suitably dimenn sioned heater tubes at a velocity oi. about 20u meters per second or more to secure the high rate of heat transmission across the heat exchange surfaces.

I shall now describe, for purposes loi illus tration, embodiments of my invention in which the advantages resulting from the high velocity ow of the combustion gases along the heat exchange surfaces are secured in boilers in itt which the combustion process is carried on continuously under substantially constant pressure, as in constant pressure combustion turbines.

` rihe exempliiication of the invention shown in Fig. l comprises a boiler plant having a combusvtilt, tion 'chamber 1. a heat exchanger 2, a steam separator drum 3, and associated and auxiliary control apparatus.

Water from the drum 3 is supplied through supply pipes 4 by means of a circulating water 110 pump 5 to the heat exchanger 2. In passing through the heat exchanger, part of the water is vaporized and water with the steam comingled with it is then returned through the pipe 5 to the steam separator drum 3 where the steam separates and collects in the collector dome 7. The wet steam from the dome 7 vis then led through the superheater 9 mounted within the combustion chamber 1 and pipes 10 to the apparatus where it is to be utilized, such as steam turbines, not shown. Fresh feed water is supplied to the boiler system by means of feed water pipe 11 connected to the drum 2, for instance.

The combustion chamber l and the heat exchanger 2 are constructed generally in a way similar to the construction of the explosion type boiler illustrated in Figs. 2 to 4 of my application, Serial No. 375,138, suitably modified for use in a continuous combustion process irstead of an explosion type combustion process. The combustion chamber is shown in the form of a pressure-tight sheet-metal chamber of steel or similar material having its walls lined with a heat insulating layer 15, of a suitable clay for instance. rihe lower end of the combustion chamber tapers down to a central inlet opening 16 at which is mounted a burner 17. 'I'o this burner, there is supplied a combustible mixture to secure combustion under substantially constant pressure conditions.

The combustible mixture is` obtained by admitting to the burner compressed air and fuel. The air may be supplied by a compressor 18 and the fuel may be in the form of a liquid that is supplied by means of a fuel pump 19. The compressor 18 and the fuel pump 19 may be driven either separately or in common as by means of an electric motor 20, which may also serve to operate the water circulating pump 5 referred to before. The compressor 18 is connected directly to the inlet 16 of the combustion chamber l, so that the compressed air delivered to the chamber to form the combustion mixture carries with it the heat of compression imparted to it in the compressor 18.

The combustion chamber 1 is provided with a gas outlet duct 23 by means of which the hot gases of combustion developed under pressure in the closed combustion chamber 1 are conveyed to the heat exchanger 2. The combustion chamber 1 is arranged to cooperate with one or more heat exchangers 2 in the same way as described in my above mentioned prior applications. The heat exchanger is shown in the form of an elongated cylindrical vessel of sheet metal having longitudinally mounted therein a large number of gas discharge tubes 25. In the upper end of the heat exchanger, there is provided an annular gas inlet chamber 26 and at the lower end of the heat exchanger, there is provided a gas outlet chamber 27. The gas discharge tubes 25 have their upper ends connected to the gas inlet chamber 26 and their lower ends to the gas outlet chamber 27. The gases of combustion discharged from the combustion chamber 1 through the gas outlet duct 23 pass into the inlet chamber 26 of-the heat exchanger, wherefrom they are discharged at high velocity through the gas discharge pipes 25 into the outlet chamber 27 whence they pass through the exhaust outlet 28.

By a suitable cho'ce of the dimensions of the gas discharge tubes 25, the combustion chamber may ce carried outin such manner as to impart to the gases of combustion developed in chamber 1 a pressure suciently high above the pressure at the exhaust end of the heat exchanger as to cause the combustion gases to flow through the gas discharge pipes 25 with a velocity of about 2G@ meters per second or more. n 'this way, a very high rate of heat exchange between the streaming combustion gases and the water surrounding the gas discharge pipes 25 is obtained as explained before, and efficient boiler operation is secured. By maintaining the water flowing through the heat exchanger in rapid circulation, the rate of steam generation is still further increased.

The superheater 9 may be arranged in the form of a pipe coil disposed near the outlet duct on the top of the combustion chamber 1, as shown in the drawings, or the superheater pipes may be distributed adjacent to the walls of the combustion chamber as in the construction shown in Figs 2 to i of my application, Ser. No. 375,138. The compressor 18, for supplying the combustible mixture to the combustion chamber under pressure may be driven, as shown, by electromotor 20 or it may, preferably, be arranged for drive by a steam turbine or by a combustion engine, in the manner illustrated in my prior applications referred to above.

'Ihe size of such combustion engine for driving 4the compressor may be materially decreased if such engine is operated with supercharging, that is, if the combustion air and fuel are supplied in compressed form. In such case, I preferably utilize the compressor which supplies the compressed ,such as those shown in my previous applications referred to above, may, of course, likewise be utilized.

Instead of separate heat exchangers or vaporizers 2, I may provide a plurality of individual tube members or boiler tubes to serve as vaporizers. Such vaporizer may be made in the form of a tube having one or more pipes extending through its center for carrying the hot combustion gases at high velocity. The water which is to be vaporized is circulated through the enclosing tube in the direction opposite to the flow of the gases.

If a steam turbine is used for driving the compressor, it may, with advantage, be constructed and operated as a back pressure or bleeder turbine under utilization of its bleeder and exhaust steam for preheating the feed Water for the steam generator.

According to my invention, the compressor load is so chosen that the steam required by the back pressure turbine for driving the compressor is approximately sufcient to preheat the feed Water to near the temperature of vaporization.

If an internal combustion chamber, such as a gas machine, Diesel engine, or the like, is used for driving the compressor, I preferably utilize the exhaust gases of such driving engine for pre- :mater heating the boiler water. in such case, I may admix the exhaust gases of the driving engine with the exhaust gases coming from the heat exchanger and utilize the mixture of these gases for preheating purposes ineconomizers or the nre.

A steam generator embodying these features is shown in Figs. 2 to 6. The generator comprises a pressure-proof combustion chamber casing 41 of steel or similar pressure proof material. The upper end of the combustion chamber casing 41 is provided with a water outlet head 42 and the lower end of the. combustion chamber casing is provided with a water inlet head 43. The chamber 41 is lined along its circumference with a layer of longitudinally extending water tubes 44 having their upper and lower ends tightly secured within suitable openings in the water outlet chamber 42 and Water inlet chamber- 43, respectively. The water tubes 44 are preferably slightly bent so as to hex and adjust themselves in place in accordance with temperature conditionswithout introducing excessive strains into the construction and without breaking loose from their connections. l

The water inlet chamber 43 is oi annular shape and has its inner wall arrangedto form an up 'wardly .tapering inlet 45 into the combustion chamber 4l. At the lower end of the inlet there is mounted a burner 46 at which the combustible mixtureris subjected to combustion." 'llhe combustion mixture may, for instance, be `provided by a mixture of compressed air supplied from a compressor 47 and fuel supplied by a fuel pump 48. As in the structure shown in Fig. l, the burnerV 46 may be constructed in the form of the burners developed for use in constant pressure combustion turbines, as described, for instance in the book of A. Stodola on Steam and Combustion Turbines, published in 1927 by McGraw- Hill Company. New York.

tif)

The wateroutlet chamber 42 may likewise be of annular form and is provided 'at the lower end of inner wall with a row of openings l to which are tightly secured the upper ends of a series of gas discharge pipes or nozzles 52. These gas discharge pipes or nozzles extend downwardly through the-water tubes 44 and are connected at their lower ends to an annular gas outlet chamber 53, having an exhaust opening 54 leading to an exhaust duct 55. Over the center opening of the annular water outlet chamber is mounted a superheater head 56 which carries a system of superheater pipes 57 to which steam that is to be superheated is admitted through the inletchamber 58 and from which superheated steam ows through the outlet chamber 59 into the supply line 60 which delivers it to the load, such as steam turbines of a power plant.

The interior of the water outlet head 42 is connected to a steam collecting vessel, such as a separator drum 61. Water that is near the `vapor'- izing temperature is circulated by pump .62 through pipe 63 by way of th'e water inlet chamber 43 and caused to flow upwardly through the water tubes 44 and then through the water outlet f chamber 42 by way of pipe 64into the drum 61.

Feed Water may be directly admitted to drum 61 by feed water pipe 65. rI'he combustion gases which are developed under pressure within the enclosed combustion chamber 41 are discharged through gas outlet pipes 52 in the direction opposite tothe direction of the flow .of the water in the water tubes 44, the gases being discharged at'high velocity to secure the high rate of heatt exchange as explained before. The exhaust gases leave the boiler through the exhaust opening 54 and are used for preheating the feed water.

The Water tubes with the gas discharge pipes extending therethrough may be arranged in the form as shown in Fig. 4 where a single gas discharge pipe extends through the-length of the water tube; orthey may be arranged as shown in Fig. 5 where several gas discharge tubes 7l are nested in a-singlewater tube 72, thereby forcing the water to circulate in thin layers and increasing the rate df steam generation. Another advantageous arrangement is shown in Fig. 6 wherein three concentric tubes '74, 75, A76 are arranged one within the other, the water being circulated through the inner tube '74 and the space between the outer tube 76 and the intermediate tube 75, while the gas is discharged through the concentric space between the inner tube 'i4 and the intermediate tube 75.

The gas discharge tubes of the arrangements described above have their cross-sections suitably designed so as to secure the desired velocity of gas flow in order to give the most favorable conditions of heat exchange. The different portions of the gas discharge tubes may be of different 1 cross-section in accordance with the specific volurne of the exhaust gases and the different values of the flow velocities. This may be secured either by connecting tubes of diiferent cross-section to each other or by restricting the cross-section of a giventube, as by pressing it hat, so that one end assumes an oval cross-section, asshown in Figs. 'l to 9.

The utilization of individual boiler tubes or vaporizers, as illustrated in Fig. 2, makes it possible-to employ these tubes as a lining for the combustion chamber so as to make it altogether unnecessary to provide a separate fire-proof insulating lining for the combustion chamber or to permit the utilization of a thinner insulating lining "77. v

The compressor 47 for supplying the combustion air at a high pressure and impart vto the combustion gases a high velocity through the heater tubes 52 for securing a high rate of steam generation may be drivenby an auxiliary steam turbine 3l. IThe turbine ill may be arranged to v steam is condensed by the water in the preheaters 86, 88 and the preheated water is led through pipe 90 to the water pump 62 and admixed tothe water circulated by the pump. In this way all the heat of the supplied steam that is not utilized in compressing the air by the compressor is returned to the feed water and applied for steam generation. y l

The compressor 47 may also be driven by an auxiliary piston-type explosion motor 91. The

-exhaust gases of the explosion motor 91 are led through' pipe 92v to the exhaust duct 55 and admixed with the exhaust gases from the heat exchanger gas tubes 52. A feed water preheater 93 provided in the outlet duct 55 conveys the rem- *nant heat in the exhaust gases from the heater ubes 52 and the explosion motor 91 to the feed:

water which kows from the supply pipe 85, through pipe 94, the preheater 93 and pipe 95 to the water pump 62, being admitted to the Water circulated through the water tubes al1. The explosion motor 91 is preferably arranged to be charged under pressure, being supplied with compressed air through pipe 99 leading from compressor 4'? and with fuel through pipe 100 leading from fuel pump 48. The heat cycle of the explosion motor 82.is thus likewise interlinked with the heat cycleof the steam generator, the heat not utilized in the motor being applied for raising the temperature of the water that is evaporated.

The invention of the present application isdirected to the features disclosed and claimed herein involving the utilization of compressed high-temperature combustion gases for imparting to the gases a high velocity and thereby securing high transfer of heat to a vaporizable substance and generation of vapor, and more particularly the use of continuous compression and combustion for the operation of the generator. The steam generator apparatus and operation disclosed above in connection with the exemplication of the foregoing invention embodies many other novel features relating to the utilization of high velocity compressed combustion for steam generation as described and claimed in my copending applications, Serial No. 333,453 led January 18, 1929, Serial No. 343,745 led March 1, 1929, Serial No. 343,746 led March 1, 1929, Serial No. 375,138 led July l, 1929, and Serial No. 419,026 filed January 7, 1930.

The various apparatus and mechanisms and the details of operation to which I referred above in describing my invention are intended only as exemplications, as many modifications and variations thereof may be utilized in carrying out the principles of my invention. I accordingly desire that the appended claims be given a broad construction commensurate with the scope of the invention within the art. The terms steam, steam generating fluid and steam generation as used in describing the practical exemplifications of my invention refer not only to steam generated by heating water which is chiefly .employed in all vapor power plants at present, but as used in the specification and claims are intended to include broadly all other equivalent vaporizable liquids suitable for vaporization by heat conveyed thereto and for utilization as a power medium.

I claim as my invention:

l. A steam generator comprising a pressureproof combustion chamber, means including compressor means for continuously supplying a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber andfor subjecting said charge to continuous combustion therein at the supplied pressure, aheat exchanger having gas discharge ducts connected'to said combustion chamber proportioned and constructed to cause the pressure of the hot combustion gases in said chamber to drive said combustion gases through said ducts at a velocity of about 20G metersper second or more,

and means for passing a steam generatingfiuid to be heated around said ducts.

2. A steam generator comprising a pressureproof combustion chamber, a gas outlet member, a heat exchanger having ducts connected between said combustion chamber and said outlet member to discharge hot gases of combustion from said chamber, means for passing a steam generating uid to be heated around said ducts, and means including compressor means for continuously supreacts?" plying a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber and for subjecting said charge to continuous combustion therein at the supplied pressure, the pressure of the hot combustion gases in said chamber' and said ducts being proportioned and constructed in such relation to the pressure conditions in said outlet member as to cause said combustion gases to be driven by their pressure through said ducts at a velocity of about 200 meters per second or higher.

3. A steam generator comprising a'pressureproof combustion chamber, means including a compressor for continuously supplying a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber and for subjecting said charge to continuous combustion therein at the supplied pressure, a heat exchanger having gas discharge ducts connected to said combustion chamber proportioned and constructed to cause the pressure of the hot combustion gases in said chamber to drive said combustion gases through said ducts at a Velocity of about 200 meters per second or more, means for passing'a steam generating uid to be heated around said ducts, heat-energized motor means for driving said compressor, and

`means interlinking the yheat cycle of said motor means with the heat cycle of said steam generrator delivering thereto heat from said motor means not utilized in compressing Worlr.

4. A steam generator comprising a pressureproof combustion chamber, means including compressor means for continuously supplying a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber and for subjecting said charge to continuous combustion therein at the supplied pressure, a heat exchanger having gas discharge ducts connected to said combustion chamber proportioned and constructed to cause the pressure of the hot combustion gases in said chamber to drive said combustion gases through said ducts at a velocity of about 20G meters per second or more, and means for passing a steam generating fluid to be heated around said ducts in a direction opposite to the direction of the gas ow in said ducts.

5. A steam generator comprising a pressureproof combustion. chamber, means including compressor means for continuously supplying a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber and for subjecting said charge to continuous combustion therein at the supplied pressure, a heat exchanger having gas discharge ducts connected to said combustion chamber proportioned and constructed to cause the pressure of the hot combustion gases in said chamber to drive saidcombustion gases through said ducts at a velocity of about 200 meters per second or more, a steam separator vessel, tubular enclosure means surrounding said ducts connected to said separator, and means for driving a preheated steam generating fluid through said enclosure means to said separator. y

6. A steam generator comprising .a pressureproof combustion chamber, means including compressor means for continuously supplying a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber and for subjecting said charge to continuous combustion therein at the supplied pressure, a heat exchanger having 4a plurality of gas discharge tubes connected to said combustion chamber proportioned and 'con.

structed to cause the pressure of the hot combustion gases in said chamber to drive said combustion gases through said ducts at a velocity of about 200 meters per second or more, a steam separator vessel, a plurality of uid tubes survitil lib bili

` chamber to drive said combustion gases through rounding said gas tubes and connected to said separator, and means for driving a preheated steam generating fluid through said fluid tubes to said separator, said huid tubes with the gas tubes in the interior thereof being disposed within said combustion chamber along the walls thereof as heat protection therefor.

ll l steam generator comprising a pressureproof combustion chamber, means including a compressor :for continuously supplying a combustible -charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber and for subjecting said charge to continuous combustion therein at the supplied pressure, a heat exchanger having gas discharge ducts connected to said combustion chamber andarranged to cause the pressure of the hot combustion gases in said chamber to drive said combustion gases through said ducts at a velocity of1 about 20o meters per second or more, a steam separator vessel, tubular enclosure means surrounding said. ducts connected to saidsepar'ator, means for driving a preheated steam generating fluid through said enclosure to said separator, heat-energized motor means for driving said compressor, and means interlinlring the heat cycle of said motor means with the heat cycle of said' steam generator' delivering to the fluid driven through said enclosure means heat supplied to said motor means but not utilized in compressing vvorlr.

d. l steam generator comprising a pressureproof combustion chamber, a gas outlet member, a heat exchanger having ducts connected between said combustion chamber and said outlet member to discharge hot gases of combustion fromsaid chamber, means for passing a steam generat ing fluid to be heated around said ducts, and means including compressor means ior continuously supplying to said chamber a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range at least l..l times greater than the'pressure in said outlet ember and for subjecting said charge to comn bustion in said chamber at the supplied pressure, said ducts being constructed and proportioned to cause the pressure of the combustion gases in said chamber to drive the gases through said ducts at a velocity oi about 200 meters per second or higher.

9. A steam generator comprising a pressure-i the pressure of the hot combustion gases in saidy chamber to drive said combustion gases through said ducts at 'a velocity of about 200 meters per second or more.

l0. A steam generator comprising a pressureproof combustion chamber, means'including a' compressor supplying a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber and for subjecting said charge to combustion `under pressure in said chamber, a heat exchanger means for holding asteam generating fiuid and having heating surfaces constituting gas discharge ducts connected to said combustion chamber proportioned and constructed to cause the pressure of fthe hot combustion gases in said said ducts at a velocity of about 200 meters per second or more, heat-energized motor means for driving said compressor, and' means interlinlring the heat cycle of said motor. means with the heat cycle of said steam generatorv delivering thereto heat supplied to said motor means but not utilized in compressing Work.

l1. A steam generator comprising a pressureproof combustion chamber, means including coinpressor means for continuously supplying a combustible charge of a predetermined pressure range to said chamber and for subjecting said charge to continuous combustion therein at the supplied pressure, a heat exchanger having a plurality of gas discharge tubes connected to said combustion chamber proportioned and constructed to cause the pressure of the hot com bustion gases in said chamber to drive said combustion gases through said ducts at a velocity of about 200 meters per second or more, a steam separator vessel, a plurality of huid tubes surrounding said gas tubes and connected to said separator, means for driving a preheated steam generating fluid through said fluid tubes to said separator, said fluid tubes with the gas tubes in the interior thereof being disposed Within said combustion chamber along the walls thereof as heatA protection therefor, and superheater tubes extending through said chamber for superheatingsteam from. said separator vessel.

A,12. The method of generating steam for sup plylng a steam consuming load which comprises compressing a gaseous body and forming therewith a combustible charge of substantial raised pressure, subjecting said combustible charge to combustion under raised pressure, and applying the pressure of the compressed hot combustion gases for imparting to said gases a velocity of about 200 meters per second or more along a heat exchange surface separating the gases from @ill a steam generating huid to transfer heat thereto lib body and forming therewith a combustible charge i2@ of substantial raised pressure, subjecting said combustible charge to combustion under raised pressure, applying the pressure of the compressed hot combustion gases for imparting to said gases a velocity or" about 2U@ mel ters per second or more along heat exchange surfaces separating the gases from a steam generating fluid to transfer heat thereto and generate steam, and Adelivering part of the heat applied to compressing said charge but not utilized i3@ in compressing work to the steam generating huid for preheating the same.

i4. The' method of generating steam for supplying a steam consuming load which comprises applying a heat motor for driving a compressor to l compress a gaseous body and form therewith la. combustible charge of substantial raised pressure, subjecting said combustible charge to combustion under raised pressure, applying the presvat sure of the compressed hot combustion gases for imparting to said gases a velocity of about 200 meters per second or more -along heat exchange surfaces separating the gases from a steam generating fiuid to'transfer heat thereto and generate g steam, and delivering part of the heat supplied to said heat motor but not utilized in compressing work to the steam generating fluid for preheating the same. 15. The method of generating steam for supplyingv a steam consuming load which comprises continuously compressing a gaseous body ami forming therewith a combustible charge of subs stantiai raiseol pressure, continuously subjecting said combustible charge to combustion under raised pressure, and applying the pressure of the compresses hot combustion gases for imparting to said. gases a velocity of. about 200 meters per second or more along heat exchange surfaces separating said gases from a steam generating iuid'to transfer heat thereto and generate steaun i6. The method of generating steam for supplying a steam consuming load. which comprises applying heat energy for continuously compressing a gaseous body and forming therewith a combustible charge of substantial raised. pressure, continuously subjecting said combustible charge to combustion under raised pressure, applying the pressure of the compressed hot combustion gases for imparting to said gases a velocity of about 20o meters per second; or more along heat exchange surfaces separating said gases from a steam generating fluid to transfer heat thereto and; generate steam, and. delivering part of the heat applied to compressing 'said charge but not utilized in conipressing wort: to the steam generating ruic-w for preheating the sameo 17. The method of generating steam for supplying a steam consuming load which comprises applying a heat motor for driving a compressor to continuously compress a gaseous body and form therewith a combustible charge of substantial raised pressure, continuously subjecting said combustible charge to combustion under raised pressure, applying the pressure of the compressed hot combustion gases for imparting to said gases a velocity of about 20@ meters per second. or more along a set of heat exchange surfaces separating said gases from a steam generating fluid to transfer heat thereto and generate steam, anniL delivering part of the heat supplied to said heatl motor but not utilized. in compressing Work to the steam generating fluid for preheating the sarnel WALTER GUSTAV NOACK.

ist

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2581316 *Oct 1, 1945Jan 1, 1952John J WolferspergerHigh rating fire-tube boiler and method of boiler operation
US2672012 *Aug 4, 1947Mar 16, 1954Babcock & Wilcox CoCombustion chamber for air-borne solid fuel
US2767690 *Sep 13, 1950Oct 23, 1956New York Central Railroad CompAir starting means for steam heating boiler control systems
US2955422 *Sep 19, 1958Oct 11, 1960Peterson Adolphe CPower turbine and pressure fluid means
US4252087 *Apr 24, 1979Feb 24, 1981Kime Wellesley RRapid response steam generating apparatus and method
US4295448 *May 1, 1980Oct 20, 1981Krupp-Koppers GmbhGas generator for fine-grained coal fuels
US5848492 *Oct 27, 1997Dec 15, 1998Brown; Claude E.Agricultural methods with superheated steam
US5867935 *May 3, 1996Feb 9, 1999Brown; Claude E.Superheated steam delivering apparatus and agricultural methods therewith
US7146795 *Jun 9, 2003Dec 12, 2006Rgp Engineering LlcSystem and method for producing injection-quality steam for combustion turbine power augmentation
US9150446 *Mar 25, 2009Oct 6, 2015Agc Glass EuropeGlass melting furnace
US20030226348 *Jun 9, 2003Dec 11, 2003Pelini Robert GinoSystem and method for producing injection-quality steam for combustion turbine power augmentation
US20070227154 *Dec 7, 2006Oct 4, 2007Pelini Robert GSystem and method for producing injection-quality steam for combustion turbine power augmentation
US20100124410 *Sep 8, 2009May 20, 2010Fsi International, Inc.System for supplying water vapor in semiconductor wafer treatment
US20110073048 *Sep 27, 2010Mar 31, 2011Alejandro JuanPressure gain combustion heat generator
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Classifications
U.S. Classification122/24, 60/784, 122/476, 60/39.182
International ClassificationF22B1/22, F22B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF22B1/22
European ClassificationF22B1/22