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Publication numberUS1950042 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1934
Filing dateOct 13, 1930
Priority dateOct 13, 1930
Publication numberUS 1950042 A, US 1950042A, US-A-1950042, US1950042 A, US1950042A
InventorsUpper Eugene L
Original AssigneeL D Lecdom
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baby bouncer
US 1950042 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 6, 1934. L. UPPER 1,950,042

BABY BOUNCER Filed Oct. 13, 1930 2 Sheetsheet l //Vl/EN7 0R Eugene L. gape."

B W CWLM I? TTOR/Vfy March 6, 1934. E, UPPER 1,950,042-

BABY BOUNCER Filed Oct. 13, 1930 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 l/VVE/VTOR [uyene A. Upper ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 6, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BABY BOUNCER Wash.

Application October 13, 1930, Serial No. 488,322

9 Claims.

My invention relates to improvement in baby bouncers of a form embodying a resiliently supported seat within which a baby or small child may sit with its feet touching the floor in such a a manner that it may bounce itself up and down and thus exercise in a way which is both pleasing and beneficial to the child.

The principal objects of my invention are to provide a baby bouncer of this nature which is strong and simple in construction, comfortable and restful for a baby to sit in, neat and attractive in appearance, capable of being readily taken down and set up, capable of being collapsed into a very neat and compact package when not in use and comparatively cheap to manufacture.

Another object of the invention is to provide a baby bouncer in which the base portion whereon the device is supported when in use forms a receptacle for the other parts of the device when they are disassembled and may serve as a carton in which the other parts of the device .may be packed for shipment or storage.

Other objects of the invention are to provide a baby bouncer in which the height of the seat is readily adjustable for babies of different size; to provide a baby bouncer having a tray at the front of the seat on which playthings and other articles may be placed; to provide a baby bouncer in which the angle of the back of the seat may be readily adjusted; to provide a baby bouncer in which the seat is supported in a rectangular frame and the frame is suspended by tension springs from supports which extend upwardly from a base frame, said supports being bent outwardly to afiord clearance for the rectangular frame.

Another object is to provide a baby bouncer in which the usual seat may be replaced by a swinging hammock or bed.

Other and more specific objects will be apparent from the following specification taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view of a baby bouncer constructed in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 2 is a sectional view of the same substantially on broken line 2-2 of Fig. 1, showing parts in elevation.

Fig. 3 is a perspective on a smaller scale of said baby bouncer.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary plan view on a larger scale of one corner of the base frame showing a socket for receiving an upright support.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view substantially on broken 55 line 5--5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view showing a modified means for adjustably receiving an upright support.

Fig. 7 is a plan view showing alternative means for fastening the seat portion to the frame so (3,

that said seat portion may be readily removed for the purpose of washing.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view substantially on broken line 88 of Fig. '7.

Fig. 9 is a view partly in section and partly in elevation showing a hammock or bed which may be used in connection with this device.

Fig. 10 is a view partly in section and partly in elevation showing an adjustable form of back rest which may be used in connection with the 7 device.

Fig. 11 is a detached plan view of the back rest shown in Fig. 10.

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary sectional View illustrating the use of compression springs instead 75, of tension springs for supporting the seat or hammock portion thereof.

Like reference numerals designate like parts throughout the several views.

In accordance with my invention I provide a rectangular base of shallow depth which may serve as a case or carton for the device and whieh is large enough to insure stability when the device is in use. I further provide four demountable supports which extend upwardly fromthe' four corners of the base and I'suspend a suitable seat or hammock from the four supports by means of springs which allow vertical movement and, to some extent, swinging movement of the seat or hammock. 9 v

The base comprises side members 15 and end members 16 rigidly secured together at their corners by any suitable means as by mortise joints 1'? and corner blocks 18. 'When the joints and blocks 18 are securely glued together a very strong and rigid base is formed. The end pieces 16 each have cleats 19 secured to both edges thereof said cleats being corner grooved'to form slots 20 for the reception of the ends of 'top and bottom pieces 21 and 22, fragments of which are shown in Fig. 5. These top and bottom pieces may be of any desired material. I prefer to make them of heavy cardboard which, I find, has ample strength for handling and shipment when tied or lightly tacked to the edges of the side members 15. The top piece 21 is necessarily left off when the device is in use while the bottom piece 22 may either be taken off or left on when the device is set up. The cleats 19 form means at each end. of the base for resting on the floor and leaving the sides clear no of the floor thus forming a more stable base for use on uneven floors.

The blocks 18 each have a metal socket 23 provided therein for the reception of the lower end of an upright support 24. The sockets 23 are formed so that they frictionally grip the lower ends of the'supports 24 and prevent accidental displacement of the supports but permit the supports to be readily disassembled. The supports 24 are bent outwardly as at 25 to afford clearance, thence extend upwardly for a substantial distance as at 24' and are bent inwardly at their top ends as at 26 to afford means to which tension springs 27 may be attached.

The lower ends of the tension springs 27 are connected, as by bolts 28, with a rectangular frame 29 which has a relatively large opening 30 in its central portion. A baglike seat 31 of flexible material, as canvas, has its upper edges secured to the frame 29 around the marginal edges of the opening 30 and said seat hangs below said frame and is provided in the bottom with two openings 32 through which the legs of a small child may extend. In the form of the invention shown in Figs. 1 and 2 the top edges of the seat 31 are permanently secured beneath strips 33 which may be nailed or otherwise secured to the frame 29 but the seat may be detachably secured to the frame 29, as shown in Fig. 7, as by forming a hem 34 around the top of the seat 31', providing a rectangular metal frame 35 within said hem and providing hooks 36 on the swinging frame 29 for the rectangular metal frame 35 to hook into.

The forward end of the frame 29 is preferably depressed to form a tray 37 and said frame may have a flat section 38 to the rear of the seat.

It will be noted that the frame 29 is enough smaller than the base so that it will fit within .the base without interfering with the corner blocks 18.

In Fig. 6 I have shown devices which make it possible to adjust the vertical height of the upright supports 24. These devices are in the nature of longer tubular sockets 40 disposed within the blocks 18 and adapted to receive the lower ends of the upright supports 24. To increase the height of the supports 24 cylindrical plugs 41 are dropped into the sockets 40 for said supports to rest on. The upper ends of the sockets 40 are preferably formed so that they frictionally grip the supports 24. The plugs 41 may be removed by inverting the base.

In Fig. 9 I have shown a hammock or swinging bed which may be used instead of the seat shown in Figs. 1 to 7. In this construction I provide a rectangular frame 42 which is open throughout its entire length and which has a hammock 43 of flexible material suspended therefrom.

In Figs. 10 and 11 I show a seat 44 of flexible material, as canvas, which has its front and side edges secured to a frame 45 and its rear edge secured to a cross bar 46 of an adjustable U shaped back rest. The cross bar 46 is rigid with side members 47 which are pivoted as at 48 to the frame 45 and the upper end of said U shaped back rest is adjustably supported by rearwardly extending arms 50 which are pivoted at their upper ends to the U shaped back rest 4647 and have their lower ends adjustably supported as in holes 51 in the frame 45. The frame 45 is similar to the frame 29 except that the rear end thereof is left open so that the angle of the back of the seat member 44 may be adjusted by supporting the lower ends of the arms 50 from different holes.

In Fig. 12 I show a frame 52 which may be substantially the same as the previously described frames 29 or 42 or 45 except that it is provided at the four corners with anti-friction bearings 53 which roll upon upright guides 54 and the said frame is resiliently supported on compression springs 55. When a small child is placed in the seat 31, 31 or 44 with its legs protruding through the holes 32 the weight of the child will extend the springs 2'7 and the childs feet will ordinarily touch the floor. This makes it possible for the child to use its legs to bounce its body up and down in a way which is pleasing to the child and affords beneficial exercise. The springs 27 are strong enough when extended to support the weight of any child for which the device is intended, this makes it possible for the child to sit in the device without using its legs if desired. The sides and back and front of the bag like seat support the child and make it impossible for the child to get out of the bouncer. The springs 27 support the frame 29 resiliently, and, in addition, allow a swinging movement which is pleasing to the child. The supports 24 will ordinarily stand at an angle, as shown in Fig. 1, but, if desired, such supports may be turned around so that they will be against either the sides or the ends of the frame 29, 42 or 45 to prevent swinging movement in either direction or said supports may be turned against both the ends and sides of the seat frame to prevent swinging movement in both directions.

The device is light in weight; strong and substantial in construction; cheap to manufacture; quickly set up or taken apart; compact when disassembled and packed in the receptacle formed by the base; safe and pleasing to the small child which is placed therein and affords exercise which is beneficial in developing the legs and body of the child. The several parts are constructed and arranged so that there is very little danger of a child getting bumped or pinched or otherwise hurt on the bouncer. The parts 24 of the upright supports stand away from the seat frame far enough to allow said seat frame to swing clear and free.

The foregoing description and accompanying drawings clearly disclose a preferred embodiment of my invention but it will be understood that this disclosure is merely illustrative and that such changes in the device may be made as are fairly within the scope and spirit of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a bouncer, of the class described, a base, a plurality of independent supports extending upwardly from a plurality of points on said base, a spring on each of said supports, a relatively rigid frame resiliently supported by said springs and a seat suspended from said frame for receiving a child, said seat being of substantially less length than the frame and being positioned substantially mid way between the two ends of the frame.

2. In a baby bouncer, a rectangular base, a support mounted in each corner of said base and extending upwardly from said base, each of said supports being bent outwardly a short distance above the base, thence having a vertical portion and thence having an inwardly bent upper end, tension springs suspended from said inwardly bent upper ends in substantially vertical alignment with the lower ends of said supports, a rectangular frame hung from said springs, and a recc-ptacle for a child suspended from said frame.

3. In a baby bouncer, a rectangular base, 'a support telescopically and frictionally mounted rotatively in each corner of said base and extending upwardly from said base, each of said supports being bent outwardly a short distance above the base, thence having a vertical portion and terminating in an inwardly bent upper end, said vertical portion moving in a circular are when said supports are moved rotatively, tension springs suspended from said inwardly bent upper ends in substantially vertical alignment with the telescopically mounted lower ends of said supports, a rectangular frame of slightly smaller size than said base supported by said springs and a receptacle for a child suspended from said frame, said supports being movable rotatively whereby each support may be selectively positioned in contact with the side of said frame or in contact with the end of said frame or clear of said frame, said supports holding said frame against swinging movement when they are in contact therewith.

4. In a baby bouncer, a rectangular base, a tubular socket member disposed in upright position in each corner of said base, an upright crank shaped support telescopically held frictionally within each of said sockets but capable of being adjusted rotatively, a spring on each of said supports, a frame supported on said springs, said supports being selectively movable rotatively into engaging or non-engaging position relative to said frame, and a receptacle for a child carried by said frame.

5. In a baby bouncer, a rectangular base, a block secured within each corner of said base, a tubular socket member disposed in upright position in each of said blocks, an upright support telescopically disposed each of said sockets and selectively adjustable rotatively, the upper end of said support being substantially over said socket and an intermediate part of said support being offset to one side of said socket, a spring hung from the upper end of each support, a substantially rectangular frame suspended from said springs with its corners in close proximity to said supports and a receptacle for a child carried by said frame.

6. In a baby bouncer, a base, supports extending upwardly from a plurality of points on said base, springs suspended from the upper ends of said supports, a relatively rigid rectangular frame resiliently supported from said springs and having a central opening of substantially less length than the frame and positioned substantially mid Way between the two ends thereof to leave two relatively flat tray portions between said seat and the ends of said frame, and a bag like childs seat suspended from said frame and having two leg openings therein.

'7. In a baby bouncer, a rectangular base, supports extending upwardly from the corners of said base, a relatively rigid rectangular frame of a length slightly less than the length of said base positioned between said supports and having an opening therethrough substantially mid way between its two ends, a bag like childs seat hanging from said frame opening, a tray in said frame at the front of said seat, a flat tray portion in said frame at the rear of said seat, and resilient means suspending said frame from said supports.

8. In a baby bouncer a rectangular base of relatively shallow depth having two sides and two ends, end cleats extending across the ends of said base for said base to rest on, said end cleats being corner grooved on the inner sides adjacent said ends, bouncer mechanism of smaller dimensions than said base whereby it may be contained within said base when it is disassembled and a removable top and bottom for said base slidable within said grooves in said cleats said base serving as a carrying crate for said bouncer mechanism when the same is disassembled.

9. In a baby bouncer, a base, upright tubular sockets provided in the marginal portions of said base, upright supports telescopically disposed within said sockets, means insertable in said sockets to hold said supports at adjusted elevations therein, springs on said supports, a frame supported on said springs and a bag like receptacle carried by said frame.

EUGENE L. UPPER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2622878 *Apr 16, 1946Dec 23, 1952Mooney William TExercising apparatus
US2625395 *Nov 27, 1950Jan 13, 1953Spangler Robert MHobbyhorse
US2672916 *Apr 14, 1950Mar 23, 1954Kenney Charles VBaby bouncing device
US2707633 *May 19, 1952May 3, 1955Thayer IncHobby horse
US3004793 *May 18, 1959Oct 17, 1961Barbara J LoomisBaby tender
US5690383 *Mar 7, 1996Nov 25, 1997Lisco Inc.Baby bungee jumper
US5720520 *Feb 14, 1997Feb 24, 1998Bengtson; Michaele L.Detachable child seat
US6030039 *Sep 26, 1997Feb 29, 2000Essler; Kirk GregoryRim chair
US6854799Feb 6, 2004Feb 15, 2005Mattel, Inc.Collapsible infant entertainment device
US6932709Feb 6, 2004Aug 23, 2005Mattel, Inc.Free-standing jumping device
US7438644Aug 23, 2005Oct 21, 2008Mattel, Inc.Free-standing jumping device
US7686390 *Nov 7, 2007Mar 30, 2010Montecito ResearchMotion simulation chair
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Classifications
U.S. Classification297/136, 472/105, 297/274
International ClassificationA47D13/00, A47D13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47D13/107
European ClassificationA47D13/10F