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Publication numberUS1950840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 13, 1934
Filing dateApr 29, 1932
Priority dateApr 29, 1932
Publication numberUS 1950840 A, US 1950840A, US-A-1950840, US1950840 A, US1950840A
InventorsCook John Edward
Original AssigneeCook John Edward
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roofing strip and method of making the same
US 1950840 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 13, 1934. J. E. COOK ROOFING .STRIP AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed April 29, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet l 2 I glfI W'HtOl Jofizz Edward 600% March 13, 1934. CO'OK 1,950,840

ROOFING STRIP AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed April 29, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Jofizz Edward 500% March 13', 1934.

J. E. COOK ROOFING STRIP AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed April 29, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 gvwezrvbo b Join Edward (00K Patented Mar. 13, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ROOFING STRIP AlID METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME 11 Claims.

, in the strip as an article and also in its method of manufacture. Whether laid in the manner described above or in any other practical manner, the nails or other fastening elements used will be exposed to all kinds of weather. While to the layman this may not appear to be harmful, every manufacturer of roofing knows from experience that the majority of complaints result from the fact that the nails are exposed to the weather. It is a well known physical phenomenon that the rays of the sun on an exposed nail have an impelling or eductive effect, resulting in the loosening of the nail or other fastening agent, thereby impairing and ultimately destroying the binding power of the fastening agent and also becoming a hazard. A loose nail not only results in a leak but makes it possible for a strong wind to completely rip off the roofing.

A loosening of the nails is also often caused where roofing is applied over green unseasoned lumber. The shrinkage or drying of the lumber and the unequal contraction and expansion of the roofing exposed to the heat of the rays of the sun and the alternate outside variation of temperature will pull and loosen the nails until they cease to perform their necessary function and can be easily lifted out with the fingers.

Other disadvantages are present when uncovered nails are used for fastening roofing such as the unsightly appearance presented thereby.

I am aware that previous attempts have been made to work out a solution for the problem,

. and I am familiar with several prior patents which disclose the use of a covering member for the purpose of covering the nails. For these various and other good reasons these prior attempts have been found to be impractical, and they have failed torecelve commercial recognition.

One of the objects of this invention is to produce a novel roofing strip which overcomes the disadvantages mentioned above and which is adapted to completely and efficiently cover the nails or other fastening means used from the weather.

Another object is the production of a combination roofing strip and connecting strip as a single unit, without the necessity of making a full duplex sheet.

A further object of the invention is the provision of novel means for joining the end of one strip to the end of the next succeeding strip.

A further object of the invention is to provide a waterproof roofing which is neat in appearance.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a. novel method of making roofing strips which is simple, effective, and inexpensive to practice.

The invention has for a further object the production of roofing strips by a novel method which embodies only a few elementary steps, utilizing the material to its maximum and reducing to the greatest possible maximum the possibility of waste.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawings and will be pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic representation of my novel method of manufacturing.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the arrangement shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a partial plan view of two roofing strips before they are cut.

Fig. 4 is a partialv view of a completed strip showing the covering flaps applied to one longitudinal and to one end edge thereof.

Fig. 5 is a plan view of one of the transverse strips.

Fig. 6 is a plan view of a ridge strip.

Fig. 7 is a cross sectional view illustrating the manner of laying the strip.

The roofing strip illustrated in Fig. 4 may be made from rags, paper, asbestos, or other materials of a felted nature, and impregnated, saturated or coated on one or both surfaces with a liquid asphalt or other waterproofing agent; The surface while still sticky is usually surfaced with sand, crushed slate, stone, tile, or other suitable material in granular or powdered form.

The lower longitudinal edge 12 of the strip is provided with a covering strip or fiap 14 which is secured at its inner edge to the strip 10 by means of a bituminous cement or other suitable adhesive. The outer or free edge of the flap 14 is of suliicient width to permit it to be raised so that nails or other fastening means 20 may be driven through the longitudinal edge 12 of the roofing strip 10.

One end of the strip 10 is also provided with a transverse covering strip or flap 16 similar to that just described. The other end is not provided with any covering strip or flap.

The exposed surfaces of all the strips are surfaced with partially embedded crushed slate, sand, grit or other suitable material as previously described, with the exception of the upper longitudinal edge, at which point a suitable margin 18 is unsurfaced to permit this and the overlapping edge of the succeeding strip to make a flatter and neater joint.

In laying the strips, the first strip is preferably placed in a horizontal direction and the lower longitudinal edge 12 is nailed as at 20 to the roof (see Fig. 4). Before nailing, a suitable cement, such as a bituminous cement, is placed between this edge 12 and edge 18 of the succeeding lower strip 10. After nailing, a suitable cement, such as a bituminous cement, is placed between this edge 12 and the free edge of the covering flap 14 and the latter is then pressed down to form a waterproof covering for the nails.

If the strip is not long enough to run the length of the roof, another strip may be joined thereto. To accomplish this the flapped end edge 22 of a second strip is placed so as to overlap the unfiapped edge of the first strip. Nails are then driven through the end edge 22 of the second strip and the unfiapped edge of the first strip. Before nailing, cement is applied between the end edge 22 and the unflapped edge of the first strip 10. After nailing, cement is applied between the end flap 16 and the end edge 22, and the end flap is pressed downwardly to cover the nails just as previously described.

After the first horizontal strip or row has been laid, a second strip 24 is placed thereover, as in Fig. 7, so that its lower fiapped edge 12 overlaps the unsurfaced margin portion 18 of the first strip 10. Since the strips are unsurfaced along their upper edges these joints will be as fiat as is practical. The longitudinal cover flap 14 of the second strip 24 is raised and nails 20 are driven through the lower longitudinal edge 12 of this second strip 24 and through the upper unsurfaced margin 18 of the first strip 10. Suitable cement is then applied beneath the cover flap 14 of the second strip 24 and this flap is then also pressed downwardly against the edge 12 to form a waterproof covering. The extreme upper layer 26 in Fig. 7 represents the crushed slate orsand surfacing.

At the peak of the roof the longitudinal strips are joined by the ridge strip 28 shown in Fig. 6. This ridge strip is comprised of an upper portion 30 and a lower portion 32 which are preferably of the same width. These upper and lower portions 30 and 32 are secured together only at their intermediate portion 34 leaving the longitudinal edges unsecured. The upper longitudinal edges 36, when the ridge strip is in position on theridge of a roof, are used as covering strips for the nails or other securing means in the same manner as The method of making my novel roofing strips is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. A strip of material of the nature previously mentioned, and having been impregnated, saturated or coated with a suitable waterproofing agent as indicated at 38 in Fig. 1, is' provided with a suitable adhesive at parallel portions 40. This may be accomplished by any suitable means as by a double brush 42.

Where the main strip 44 is double the width of the finished strip 10 shown in Fig. 4, these parallel adhesive portions 40 are placed centrally on the main strip and preferably each is spaced an equal distance from the longitudinal center. It is clear, however, that these parallel adhesive portions 40 would be placed at correspondingly convenient locations where the width of the main strip 44 were some other multiple (in width) of the finished strip 10 of Fig. 4, or where the main strip is equal to or only slightly wider than strip 10 shown in Fig. 4.

Though the process will be described principally with reference to a main strip 44 which is substantially double the width of the strip 10 of Fig. 4, it is to be understood that the process can be applied with equal readiness where main strips of different widths are used. The only changes necessary are well within the realm of a skilled mechanic.

After the adhesive has been applied in parallel lines, a narrower strip 46, which may be of the same material as the main strip 44, is placed over the latter so that its edges cover the parallel adhesive portions 40. The narrower strip 46, it will be noted, is of a width substantially equal to the distance between the outer edges of said parallel adhesive portions 40. Thus, the outer portions of the narrower strip 46 are secured to the main strip 44 while the intermediate portion 48 remains unsecured. If necessary, the strips may then be passed between rollers (not shown) or otherwise pressed together to insure a firm connection.

The main strip 44 and the narrower strip 46 are then passed through a coating solution which may be a bituminous or other waterproofing solution. This is diagrammatically indicated in Figs. 1 and 2 in which 50 represents the container, 52 the coating solution, and 54 a roller for causing the strips to pass through the solution to permit all surfaces of both strips to be coated except for the central intermediate portion 48.

As the strips pass from the coating solution 52 marginal scrapers 56 are applied to remove all but a small quantity of the coating from the outer edges of the main strip. In the finished product as illustrated in the other figures this marginal edge is indicated by the reference numeral 18.

At suitable intervals, determined preferably by the desired length of the finished strip, transverse strips 58 are applied to the main strip 44. These strips 58, where the main strip 44 is twice the width of the finished strip 10 are preferably of a length equal to one half the width of the main strip.

The transverse strips 58 are laid on the main strip and are preferably positioned in staggered relation. The coating 52 acts as the securing means for the transverse strips 58. As illustrated in Fig. 3, the free edge 62 of one of the transverse strips 58 is to the right of the secured portion 60, while the free or outer edge 62 of the transverse strip on the other side of the longitudinal center of the main strip is to the left of the secured portion 60.

The transverse strips before being laid on the main strip have been passed through a coating solution similarto that indicated by 52 in Figs. 1 and 2.

Sand, crushed slate or other suitable material 26 is then applied to the upper surfaces of all of the strips and since they are still sticky from their coating, this material will adhere thereto. The sand or stone may be applied by means of a dispenser 64 of the hopper type. After the surfacing has been accomplished, the marginal edge portions 18 which were previously scraped of coating by the scrapers 56 are now brushed by wire brushes 66 so as to remove any sand or crushed slate which may have adhered thereto. Thus these marginal edge portions are substantially free from coating and mineral surfacing in overlapping relation will be as fiat as practical. Where a grain surface coating is desired, the strip is treated by suitable rolls for producing the grain effect. This would take place before the transverse strips 58 are applied.

After surfacing with mineral 26 as illustrated in Fig. 1, the strips are passed over suitable rolls to produce the desired finish as well as to cool the strips. One of such rolls is indicated in Fig. l by the reference numeral 68.

The main strip 44 and the narrower strip 46 are then divided along a line defined by the longitudinal center of the narrower strip 46. Should it be desirable to provide the finished strips with longitudinal covering flaps of different widths, the strips may be cut on a line to either side of the longitudinal center of the narrower strip 46. The cutting may be accomplished by any suitable means as by means of a rotary knife '70.

After the main and narrower strip are cut longitudinally, the strips are cut transversely to make them the desired lengths. It is preferable, however, to cut transversely along lines defined by the free outer edges 62 of the transverse strips 58. This may be accomplished by any suitable cutter mechanism as by vertically descending cutters 72.

The finished product (shown in Fig. 4) is thus provided at its lower longitudinal edge 12 with the cover strip 14, the outer edge of which may be raised to permit nails to be driven through the edge of the strip itself. One end of each finished strip is provided with a transverse covering flap 16, the outer edge of which is adapted to cover a nail when the strip is in laid position. It will be noted that it is always the same end of each strip which is provided with a transverse covering fiap. This is accomplished by securing the strips in staggered relation as described, and it is a decidedly important feature of my invention since it completely eliminates the creation of what is known in the trade as rights.and lefts.

The finished article provides a completely satisfactory roofing strip which is adapted to be laid so as to provide an efficient waterproof covering and which is practical, neat in appearance, and lasting. Not only are the fastening nails completely covered and protected from rain and from the rays of the sun, but provision is made for securing the strips endwise Without the use of a separate connecting strip.

The novel method of making permits the strips to be manufactured at a low cost and in a quick and efficient manner. It also eliminates what is known in the trade as righ and lefts as all of the strips produced by this method are provided at one and the same end with the nail covering flaps.

Having now described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. -A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip, securing the edges of said narrower strip to said wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, and cutting said strips longitudinally to form marginal nail flaps.

2. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip and along the longitudinal center thereof, securing the edges of the narrower strip to the wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, and cutting said strips longitudinally through said central unconnected portion.

3. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip and longitudinally thereof, securing the edges of the narrower strip to said wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, applying strips transversely of said wider strip, cutting said first named strips longitudinally through the central unconnected portion, and cutting said wider strip transversely at suitable intervals.

4. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip and along the longitudinal center thereof, securing the edges of the narrower strip to the wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, and cutting said strips through their longitudinal center.

5. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip, securing the edges of the narrower strip to said wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, applying strips transversely of said wider strip, securing only an edge portion of each transverse strip to said wider strip while leaving the opposite edge portion free, cutting said first named strips longitudinally along their central unconnected portion, and cutting said wider strip transversely at suitable intervals.

6. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip, securing the edges of the narrower strip to said wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, applying strips transversely of said wider strip, said transverse strips having a length substantially equal to onehalf the width of said wider strip, securing each transverse strip only along one longitudinal edge portion while leaving the other longitudinal edge portion free and unconnected, cutting said first named strips longitudinally through their central unconnected portion, and cutting said wider strip transversely along lines defined by the free edges of said transverse strips. '7. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip and along the longitudinal center thereof, securing the edges of the narrower strip to said wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, applying strips transversely of said wider strip, said transverse strips having a length substantially equal to one-half the width of the wider strip, securing only one edge of each transverse strip to said wider strip, cutting said first named strips through their longitudinal center, and cutting said wider strip along lines defined by the free edges of said transverse strips.

8. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip and along the longitudinal center thereof, securing the edges of the narrower strip to said wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, applying narrower strips transversely of said wider strip, said transverse strips having a length substantially equal to one-half the width of the wider strip, securing only one edge of each transverse strip to said wider strip, said transverse strips being applied in staggered relation, the unsecured edges of each transverse strip on one side of the longitudinal center of said wider strip facing in one direction, and the unsecured edges of the transverse strips on the other side of the longitudinal center of the wider strip facing in the opposite direction, cutting said first named strips through their longitudinal center, and cutting said wider strip along lines defined by the free edges of said transverse strips.

9. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying parallel adhesive portions longitudinally on a strip, applying a narrower strip to said first strip and securing the former to the latter by said parallel adhesive portions so that the edges of said narrower strips will be secured while the central portion remains unsecured, passing said strips through a liquid asphalt bath to coat all surfaces of said strips except said central unsecured portion, applying transverse strips to said wider strip, surfacing the upper surfaces of all of said strips with mineral particles, cutting said first named strips longitudinally through the central unsecured portion, and cutting said divided wider strip transversely at suitable intervals;

10. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying adhesive to a longitudinal strip along centrally located longitudinal parallel lines thereon, applying a longitudinal strip over said parallel lines of adhesive so that said narrower strip will be secured at its outer edges to said first strip leaving the central portion unconnected, passing said strips through a liquid waterproofing adhesive bath to coat all surfaces of the strips except the central unconnected portion, surfacing the upper surface of said strips with particles of mineral, partially embedding said particles in the strips, and cutting said strips longitudinally through their central unconnected portion and transversely at suitable intervals.

11. A method of making roofing which comprises, applying a narrower strip of material to a wider strip, securing the edges of said narrower strip to said wider strip while leaving the central portion thereof unconnected, and dividing said strips longitudinally to form marginal nail flaps.

JOHN EDWARD COOK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3998685 *Feb 18, 1976Dec 21, 1976The Celotex CorporationAsphalt saturated felt, coating with granules
US5018636 *Jul 23, 1990May 28, 1991Gary RossSafety mug for liquids with improved top which permits the liquid to retain its temperature while it is in the mug and further retain the liquid if the mug is bumped
US5507906 *Aug 3, 1994Apr 16, 1996M. J. Woods, Inc.Method for making multilayer pad
US5771524 *Dec 31, 1996Jun 30, 1998M.J. Woods, Inc.Disposable pad
US6493898Jul 6, 1999Dec 17, 2002M. J. Woods, Inc.Laminated pads and methods of manufacture employing mechanically folded handles
USRE36601 *Apr 13, 1998Mar 7, 2000M.J. Woods, Inc.Method for making multilayer pad
WO1995003175A1 *Jul 21, 1994Feb 2, 1995Woods M J IncMethod for making multilayer pad
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/271, 156/291, 52/543, 156/299, 156/510, 156/280
International ClassificationE04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D2001/005
European ClassificationE04D1/26