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Publication numberUS1950957 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 13, 1934
Filing dateJan 30, 1933
Priority dateJan 30, 1933
Publication numberUS 1950957 A, US 1950957A, US-A-1950957, US1950957 A, US1950957A
InventorsWarner F Wilhelm
Original AssigneeMarshall Field & Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Variable resistant chemicals and bandage embodying same
US 1950957 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

arch 13, 1934. w. F. WILHELM 1,950,957

VARIABLE RESISTANT CHEMICALS AND BANDAGE EMBODYING SAME Filed Jan. 50, 1933 Wztrrzer- 'eZm Patented ar. 13, E934 VARIABLE RESISTANT CHEMICALS AND BANDAGE EMBODYING SAME Warner 1F. Wilhelm, Chicago, 111., assignor to Marshall Field & Gompany, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application January 1933, Serial No. 654,115

14 Claims.

This invention relates to variable resistant chemicals and surgical and other bandages, dressings and covers embodying same. Therefore, the variable resistant chemical of this invention 5 may be used in any desired form and, if desired may be applied to practically any sort of bandage or cover and is particularly applicable to bandages which are used where it is necessary or desirable to provide a deodorant or to provide medicinal agents of any sort, antiseptic or germicidal, or having a retardant or destructive efiect on the growth of micro-organisms. In one form it is particularly applicable to sanitary napkins.

It is one object of the invention, therefore, to provide a variable resistant chemical which may be in the form of a deodorant means applied to a bandage. It is another object to provide in a bandage agents having the properties of retarding or destroying micro-organisms and having general antiseptic and germicidal properties. Another object of the invention is to provide such agents in bandages and to provide in connection with the agents means for preventing their premature action or reaction and to provide means whereby the action or effect of the agents is retained substantially undiminished until the time of use. Another object of the invention is, therefore, to provide in connection with bandages medicinal, antiseptic or germicidal agents having a retarding and destructive efiect upon the growth of micro-organisms and to provide in connection with such agents what might be termed protective" means for preventing their premature action 0r reaction and to arrange such means so that at the time that the bandage is used, the protecting means is so altered as to permit the action or reaction at the time'of use.

The material or agent which is to be included with the bandage may be included in almost any sort of bandage and may be put into or upon the bandage in a variety of ways. In one form of the invention it is convenient to build up a bandage of a number of layers of material.

This may be cloth. cotton or cellulose material 15 and it may or may not be built up of a number of layers. The antiseptic and deodorant agent may be put between the various layers or may be all gathered in a more or less compact layer. It may be put in as the bandage is made or it may be inserted afterwards. but in general the invention is most advantageously carried out by using a bandage with at least two layers and by putting the agent between or on the layers so that it has the advantage of the mechanical protection of being enclosed between layers of material and thus it is not lost or displaced before the time of use.

Several forms of the invention are shown in the accompanying drawing, wherein-- Figure 1 is a plan view of a bandage, with parts broken away and parts in section;

Figure 2 is a transverse section taken at line 22 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a section generally similar to Figure 2, showing a modified form;

Figure 4 is a plan view, with parts broken away and parts in section, illustrating a further modified form.

Like parts are designated by like characters throughout the specification and drawing.

As shown in Figures 1 and 2, the bandage is made up of three layers of material A. These may be of cloth or fabric of any sort; they may be of cotton or of cellulose material, or of any material suitable for the making of bandages.

Between each of the layers of material there may be positioned a layer B of the medicinal agent and these layers of medicinal agent may extend throughout the entire area of the bandage but ordinarily it is satisfactory to have the area so limited, as shown in Figure 1, to that portion of the bandage which is most likely to come in contact with the material which it is desired to have the agent act upon. Where the bandage is made up of a number of layers, it is frequently convenient to surround it with an envelope portion C. which may be of woven fabric or any other material, and which serves to hold the layers of the bandage and the bandage generally against breaking apart. It will be understood that as shown in Figures 1 and 2 there are but three layers of material forming the bandage proper and two layers of the medicinal agent. It might be convenient to have almost any number of layers of each of these parts of the bandage. There might be layers of cloth between which there might not be any of the medicinal agent.

As shown in Figure 3 there are but two layers of the bandage D, D, and between them is a layer or quantity of the agent E. This bandage is not provided with a cover such as the fabric covering C of the bandage shown in Figures 1 and 2.

There is shown in Figure 4 a further modified form in which the bandage is made up of two or more layers of material F, F. Between the layers there is a quantity of the agent G and upon the outer surface of the upper layer there is also a quantity or layer of the agent G The various forms and modifications of the bandage illustrated above serve to illustrate three or greater numbers of coatings of the sodium possible forms of a bandage arranged to contain and support the desired medicinal agent. An almost infinite number of arrangements is possible. They may be generally summarized by the statement that the desired medicinal agent, which will be pointed out in greater detail below, is put onto or within or both onto and within some form of bandage which is of suitable shape and material for the application to which it is to be put.

The medicinal agent is so manufactured or treated that while it is in the bandage and until the actual moment of use, it is held against premature action or reaction. Since the bandages are ordinarily intended for bodily use, the protective means or coating arranged for the agent is preferably such that when the bandage is applied, either the body heat, moisture or secretions, or any or all together, cause such a change in the protective means that the agent itself is freed for action or reaction and it thus becomes effective for, or is released for, use only when the bandage which carries it is put into use.

As a concrete example of one form of the invention and one application, the invention may be applied in the manufacture of sanitary napkins. This may convoniently be made of cellulose material arranged in layers and may be provided with an enclosing fabric envelope, and it thus conforms generally to the form of bandage "shown in Figures 1 and 2. There will be arranged in one or more bodies and between two or more of the layers of the napkins, or upon the napkin, a quantity of the medicinal agent. This may be inserted or applied at any time during the manufacture of the completed napkin and it may be applied either dry or moist, and it may be applied to the napkin during manufacture or after man ufacture, when it is dry or moist.

One satisfactory In: "crial which may be used .as the medicinal agent o be applied to the napkin is chloramine. In one manner of carrying out the invention, this is preferably reduced to a. more or less granular form, of preferably small size, and while it all need not be reduced to particles of the same size, it is usually more convenient to treat the material so that the particles are approximately of the same order of size. A quantity of this granular chloramine is put into a revolving drum, or any other coating chamber,

which is formed of non-reactive material. Into this drum or chamber and upon the chloramine within it there is sprayed or otherwise applied a quantity of sodium stearate, which may be mixed with chloroform or other diluent mate. ial

.so that it may be conveniently sprayed. The

chloramine to be coated need not all be put into the coating chamber at once but may be introduced gradually so that certain portions of it remain longer in the chamber than other portions and thus certain portions receive thicker stearate than other portions, and in fact as chloramine is continuously added, the particles that have been in the longest will have the thickest coating of stearate and the thickness of the coating on the particles will vary substantially with the time that they have been in the coating chamher, the thickest coating being on the particles first introduced and the thinnest being on those last introduced. After a suitable quantity of chloramine has been introduced into the coating chamber, it is then removed and applied to the napkins, as has been said, in any suitable way, either by being put between the layers or upon the outer surface of the bandage or otherwise,

and it may be applied to the bandage when totally dry or moist. For some purposes it may be fas tened to the bandage by an adhesive and when that is done the adhesive chosen is one which is harmless and which preferably takes no part in the reaction which occurs when the protective coating is so altered as to permit the chloramine particles to become active. Instead of the adhesive a binder might be used which might be water or some other solvent or partial solvent, which will cause the coating of the particles, or the material, generally, to soften to the degree necessary to'cause them when drying, or otherwise, to adhere to the bandage portion. Any compound of fatty acid or any oleagenous or sticky substance may be used. The particular method of applying the agent to the bandage forms no particular part of the present invention and the agent might be applied at any stage of the manufacture, mechanically or by hand.

I have described the preparation of a quantity of chloramine so that some particles will be coated more heavily than others. In the method described it will be apparent that there will be a progressive variation of thickness of coating upon the various particles so that in efiect if the particles are introduced into the chamber for treatment in ten increments, the first increment will have ten coatings and the last only one, or the coating of the first increment will be ten times as thick as that of the last increment, and the coatings of the other increments will vary progressively from the greatest to the least, depending upon the time that the particular increment was in the treating chamber and subjected to the action of coating. When this quantity of material is used, it will preferably be mixed so that any given fraction will contain some particles having the greatest coating and some the least, and particles with the intermediate gradations or numbers of coatings, and thus when the material is put into use, there will be a progressive action. Those having the least coating will become active the first, because this coating will be destroyed, broken or so altered as to permit action more rapidly than the particles having the heavier coating,'and there is thus set up a progressive action and when the bandage is put into use all of the particles do not become active at the same time. When the action has first commenced by the change in the coating of the materials having the lightest coating or the coating most easily broken, then action will continue progressively as the particles having heavier coatings or coatings less easily broken are gradually affected, and the final action will involve the particles having the thickest or the most difficultly broken coating. For many purposes it is preferable to use chloramine so treated and arranged as to provide this progressive action. However, this is not essential and for some purposes the chloramine arranged in the bandage is all uniformly treated and thus the particles act more nearly at the same time and without the delayed or progressive action just referred to.

The chloramine may be coated in a variety of Ways and with a variety of coatings and it is not necessary to use a solution or mixture of sodium stearate with chloroform. A.vapor of the coating material may be prepared and the chloramine particles may be dropped or otherwise moved through the vapor. If sodium stearate is used it may for some purposes be applied as an aqueous mixture without the chloroformandwhen applied as an aqueous mixture it is preferably previously placed in fine suspension. For this purpose it may be passed through a colloid mill. It

and other alkaline earth compounds may be used,

as well as other materials. Sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate are suitable coating materials for some purposes.

While I have referred to chloramine as the active agent and while it is one of the most important, my invention is not limited to the use or the treatment of chloramine. Chloramine is a material which, while it has other actions, does upon suitable reaction liberate chlorine gas and my invention therefore broadly contemplates the use of a gas-liberating material. It may be applied to any material containing a halogen radical. It may also be applied to sodium perborate, trioxymethylene and chlorthymol. I may also use a large variety of other materials, in-

cluding other gas liberating materials. I may also use a large variety of other materials that are not gas liberating. For some purposes it is desirable to use or to add products other than those already suggested and these would include almost any desirable substance which might be useful on or in the bandage. Among such other materials are aromatic products, perfumes and essential oils.

formation of odor producing products.

Thus far I have referred to the material which is used as being a medicinal agent or an antiseptic or germicidal agent, or a deodorant or an agent having a retarding or destructive effect upon the growth of microorganisms. For purposes of brevity, in some of the claims I shall refer i) this material simply as a reactive agent and where that expression is used in the claims I include an agent having any or all of the properties desired, mentioned or suggested.

The bandage, in whatever particular style or details it may be made, embodies some holding or supporting body and a quantity of reactive material or medicinal agent on or in the bandage body, and as has been pointed out, this reactive material is provided with a protective coating so that it is held against reaction until actually put in use. Whether or not the bandage is in the particular form of a sanitary napkin, or of some other type of bandage, its use is much the same. When it is to be used it is put in place upon the body and inuse comes in contact with body temperature and body fluids. In effect the temperature and the fluids, and in some cases the temperature alone, so alters the protective covering as to permit the reaction of the material which reacts with the body fluids or other products to prevent decomposition, to prevent or retard the growth of micro-organisms and to prevent or retard the In its preferred form the bandage embodies the reactive or medicinal agent so arranged as to produce a progressive reaction and thus it may be retained in use for an extended period and as additional quantities of body fluids come in contact with the bandage, additional portions of the reactive'agent will be freed for reaction so that in effect a fresh portion of the bandage is presented to a succession .of accretions or deposits of body fluid for an extended period of time. Of course, the bandage may be used without embodying the progressive reaction and for some purposes it is desirable to have all of the reactive agent coated in oneway so that it acts substantially at the Either this action or the progressive action maybe provided for.

In one'particular typeof agent, where the chloramine particles are used as the active agent and where they are covered with a coating of stearate. the body fluids dissolve or soften the coating sumciently to destroy its insulating or protecting effect and to free the chloramine for its gasliberating action and for its other and subsequent benefits and effects. Where other forms of active agent are used and where other coatings are used, the effect is substantially the same. Either the body temperature or the body fluids or both, acting together, alter the protective coating to such a degree that it no longer has a protecting effect and, therefore, the desired reaction takes place.

The progressive operation of the reactive agent has been suggested and for many purposes this is desirable. The invention, however, contemplates almost any possible action in which the reactive agent may act all at substantially one time or it may act at almost any speed variation so that in one case it might act at a constant speed, in effect a certain number of particles becoming active at each time interval, so that for the total time involved there is a constant amount of reaction. Or the coatings and material may be so arranged that at first there is a substantial quantity of reaction, then for a period little or none, and then more reaction. In other words, it is within the contemplation of the invention to provide almost any possible variation of speeds of reaction.

The bandage has been spoken of as being adapted for bodily use and by this is meant not merely human use but use upon animals.

While the bandage will frequently become effective under the influence of the body heat, moisture or secretions, it may be made effective and the reactive material may be freed for reaction as the result of the action or effect of influences arising outside of and apart from the body.

For some purposes the edges of the bandage may be compressed or fastened together to prevent spilling of the agent or other material which may be placed between the layers of the bandage. Such compressed portion is indicated in one of the accompanying figures at H. The bandage may be compressed together at this point or it may be fastened together by some adhesive material or stitched together. Thus the layers or some of them may be fastened together in any suitable way .so that material placed between them cannot accidentally escape or be spilled from them. As shown stitching has been used. This is not necessary and as stated any form or means of arranging the bandage to prevent spilling might be used and is within the contemplation of the invention.

I claim:

1. In combination in a bandage, a quantity of particles of chemically active material, and protective coatng material upon said particles, adapted to prevent its premature action, the coatings of difierent particles differing in their degree of resistance to materials with which they are brought into contact. so that, at the time of use, the coatings are affected in accordance with their varying degrees of resistance, to free parts of the material for action at diifering times and to provide a progressive action of the entire mass of material, and a bandage body carrying said active material.

chloramine divided into particles,

2. In combination in a bandage,

the chloramine for reaction during use is accomplished, and a bandage body carrying said ch1oramine and forming with it a bandage.

3. In combination in a bandage, a quantity of chloramine, divided into particles, protective coatings of sodium stearate for the said particles to prevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being of varying degrees of resistance to the materials with which they will be brought into contact at the time of use, whereby a progressive freeing of the chloramine for reaction during use is accomplished, and a bandage body carrying said chloramine and forming with it a bandage.

4. In combination in a bandage, a quantityof chloramine, divided into particles, protective coatings for the said particles, to prevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being of varying degrees of thickness, whereby a progressive freeing of the chloramine for reaction during use is accomplished, and a bandage body carrying said chloramine and forming with it a bandage 5. In combination in a bandage, a quantity of particles of chemically reactive material, and a protective coating upon said particles, adapted to prevent their premature reaction, the coatings of different particles differing in thickness, so that, at the time of use, the coatings are affected in accordance with their varying degrees of thickness, to free parts of the material for reaction at differing times and to provide a progressive reaction of the entire mass of material, and a bandage body carrying said reactive material.

6. In combination in a bandage, a quantity of chloramine, divided into particles; protective coatings of sodium stearate for the said particles to prevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being of varying degrees of resistance to the materials with which they will be brought into contact at the time of use, whereby a freeing of the chloramine for reaction at a varying rate of speed during use is accomplished, and a bandage body carrying said chloramine and forming with it a bandage.

7. In combination in a bandage, a quantity of chloramine, divided into particles, protective coatings of a compound of fatty acid for the said particles to prevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being of varying degrees of resistance to the materials with which they will be brought into contact at the time of use, whereby a freeing of the chloramine for reaction at a varying rate of speed during use is accomplished, and a bandage body carrying said chloramine and forming with it a bandage.

8. A composition of matter comprising a quantity of particles of chemically active material, and

protective coating material upon said particles, adapted to prevent its premature action, the coatings of difierent particles differing in their degree of resistance to materials with which they are brought into contact, so that, at the time of use, the coatings are afiected in accordance with their varying degree of resistance, to free parts of the material for action at differing times and to provide a progressive action of the entire mass of material.

9. A composition of matter comprising a quantity of chloramine divided into particles, protective coatings for the said particles to prevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being of varying degrees of resistance to the materials with which they will be brought into contact at the time of use, whereby a progressive freeing of the chloramine for reaction during use is accom plished.

10. A composition of matter comprising a quantity of chloramine, divided into particles, protective coatings of sodium stearate for the said particles toprevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being or varying degrees of resistance to the materials with which they will be brought into contact at the time of use,

whereby a progressive freeing of the chloramine for reaction during use is accomplished.

11. A composition of matter comprising a quantity of chloramine, divided into particles, protective coatings for the said particles, to prevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being of varying degrees of thickness, whereby a progressive freeing of the chloramine for reaction during use :is accomplished.

12. A composition of matter comprising a quantity of particles of chemically reactive material, and protective coatings upon said particles, adapted to prevent their premature reaction, the coatings of diflerent particles difiering in thickness, so that, at the time of use, the coatings are afiected in accordance with their varying degrees of thickness, to free parts of the material for reaction at differing times and to provide a progressive reaction of the entire mass of material.

13. A coll position of matter comprising a quantity of chloramine, divided into particles, protective coatings of sodium stearate for the said particles to prevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being of varying degrees'of resistance to the materials with which they will be brought into contact at the time of use, whereby a freeing of the chloramine for reaction at a varying rate of speed during use is accomplished.

14. A composition of matter comprising a quantity of chloramine, divided into particles, protective coatings of a compound of fatty acid for the said particles to prevent their premature reaction, the said coatings being of varying de grees of resistance'to the materials with which they will be brought into contact at the time of use, whereby a freeing of the chloramine for reaction at a varying rate of speed during use is accomplished. V

WARNER F. WILHELM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2418907 *Sep 4, 1943Apr 15, 1947Personal Products CorpSanitary napkin
US2464053 *Mar 19, 1945Mar 8, 1949Mckesson & Robbins IncMixture containing penicillin
US2690415 *Feb 2, 1951Sep 28, 1954Frederick A ShulerFlexible sheetlike odor-adsorbent bodies and method of producing same
US2921031 *May 30, 1942Jan 12, 1960Harry ScherrAnti-vesicant composition
US3070095 *Jun 24, 1954Dec 25, 1962Torr DavidDisposable multi-ply product
US3124135 *Jun 30, 1960Mar 10, 1964 Cellulosic products
US3154494 *Aug 7, 1961Oct 27, 1964United States Borax ChemFabric laundry compositions
US3329145 *Feb 12, 1965Jul 4, 1967Johnson & JohnsonSanitary napkin having control element with gel-forming material
US3342674 *Mar 3, 1965Sep 19, 1967Monsanto CoSterilizing, sanitizing, and/or disinfecting shapes
US3762415 *Mar 6, 1968Oct 2, 1973Maxine B MoneyAnti-bacterial menses absorbing pads
US3794034 *Feb 27, 1973Feb 26, 1974J JonesOdor reductant body waste pad
US3804094 *Feb 7, 1973Apr 16, 1974OrealBody fluid absorbent material containing periodic acid as deodorizing agent
US4363322 *Apr 12, 1979Dec 14, 1982Andersson A E BrorDeodorizing and disinfecting liquid-absorbing product and process for production thereof
US4583980 *Jan 14, 1985Apr 22, 1986Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf AktienSanitary hygiene products having odor-preventing properties
US5558873 *Mar 8, 1995Sep 24, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationSoft tissue containing glycerin and quaternary ammonium compounds
US8138106Sep 30, 2005Mar 20, 2012Rayonier Trs Holdings Inc.Cellulosic fibers with odor control characteristics
US8574683Feb 16, 2012Nov 5, 2013Rayonier Trs Holdings, Inc.Method of making a pulp sheet of odor-inhibiting absorbent fibers
Classifications
U.S. Classification424/447, 252/384, 424/40, 422/5, 252/187.33, 424/76.8, 604/359
International ClassificationA61F13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/8405
European ClassificationA61F13/84B