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Publication numberUS1951604 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 20, 1934
Filing dateOct 17, 1931
Priority dateOct 17, 1931
Publication numberUS 1951604 A, US 1951604A, US-A-1951604, US1951604 A, US1951604A
InventorsFriedlander Philip M
Original AssigneeBertha Friedlander
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag for folding chairs
US 1951604 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 20, 1934. P. M. FRIEDLANDER BAG FOR FOLDING CHAIRS 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 17

I I Ill! llll my/K? INVENTOR BY ATTORN%V i March 20, 1934. P. M. FRIEDLANDER BAG FOR FOLDING CHAIRS Filed Oct. 17, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 UNITED STA Patented Mar. 20, 1934 BAG FOR FOLDING CHAIRS Philip M. Friedlander, New York, N. Y., assignor to Bertha Friedlander, New York, N. Y.

TES PATENT OFFICE My invention relates to bags of the kind used for carrying a number of folding chairs such as chairs used for card parties, by undertakers, and

various other uses Where the chair is made to fold into compact shape for storage or transportation. It is customary to provide a bag for holding a number of folding chairs in close, parallel relation to facilitate handling of a number of chairs as a unit and to protect the chairs while they are being handled, as well as to provide convenient means for storing the chairs when they are not in use.

One object of my invention is to provide a bag of this type which is simple in construction, in-

expensive to manufacture, and which will hold a number of chairs in close, parallel relation with proper protection between the several chairs to prevent them from rubbing against each other. The bag proper is preferably made of a single piece of heavy canvas or duck, although any other for maintaining the chairs separated from each other and I also provide means for holding up the top edges of the partitions in order thatthey will not sag down and permit the tops of the chairs to rub against each other.

' Another object of the invention is to provide a continuous strip of binding tape around the edges of all of the top flaps, so that there will be no tendency for the bag to tear at the corners of the several flaps.

Another object of the invention is to provide false seams along three of the vertical edges of the bag and a real seam for the fourth edge, so that while the bag is, made of one piece it will have a tendency to shape up in rectangular form the same as if it were made of four separate pieces attached together. a 1

Another object of the invention is to provide suitable straps for holding the top flaps folded over the chairs and also to provide a strap passing around the entire bag to hold it closed and to form a suitable means for carrying the bag and-its contents as a unit. Other advantages will be set forth in the following description of my invention.

In the drawings forming part of this application,

Figure 1 is a perspective View of a bag containing my invention and showing the same in closed position ready to be carried, 60,

Figure 2 is a cross sectional view thereof,

Figure 3 is a horizontal sectional view,

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the upper portion of the bag with the flaps partially folded and with one flap broken away to show the unfolded as portion,

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the upper portion of the bag before the flaps are folded,

Figure 6 is a fragmentary view showing the method of forming the multi-ply bottom wall and the method of attaching the partitions to the bag, and

Figure 7 is a face view of a blank from which the bag may be made of one piece.

In Figure 7 I have shown a blank 1 from which 75, the one piece bag may be formed. The dotted lines in this figure indicate the lines on which the blank will be folded when assembled. The blank 1 is cut from a single piece of fabric and contains two sections 2, 3 of similar shape and dimensions so which will form the side walls of the bag when the same is made up. It also contains two sections 4, 5 which lie next to the sections 2, 3 and which will form the ends of the bag when the same is made up. The bottom of the blank is preferably provided with a section 6 contiguous with one of the sections 2 and which will form the bottom wall of the bag. The two sections '7, 8 contiguous with the end wall sections 4, 5 will be folded within the section 6 and form reinforcements for the bottom wall of the bag adjacent the ends.

The upper portion of the blank in Figure 7 is provided with two sections 9, 10 having rounded 13 is applied to the blank to overlap the top edge,

and this tape runs continuous around the curved top edges of the four flap sections 9, 10, 11, 12 so that this tape, which serves to bind the edge and protect the same, can be traced as shown in Figure 5 as a continuous member extending around the top edges of all four flaps. The blank is provided with lines of stitches 14, to form false seams along the three lines 15, 16, 1'7 as shown in Figure 3 so that the material will take a natural bend and fall into rectangular shape.

The opposite ends of the blank are brought together and are secured to each other by a line of stitches 18 forming a real seam on the fourth corner or edge of the bag. Instead of forming the bag of four separate pieces with real seams at each corner, it is less expensive and more dependable to apply the false seams to three of the edges in order to create the desired shape.

The bottom member 6 is turned so as to extend across the bottom of the bag and the two bottom members '7 and 8 are turned up to lie under the member 6 for the purpose of reinforcing the ends of the latter and when all three of these members 6, 7 and 8 are stitched together and to the vertical walls of the bag they form a reinforced and closed bottom. The members 6, 7 and 8 may be conveniently turned up in a horizontal position at the time the ends of the blank are being stitched along the line 18.

The partitions for separating the several parallel chairs placed in the bag are formed as follows: Each partition consists of a wall of fabric 19 with their ends stitched as shown at 20 to the interior of the end walls 4 and 5 of the bag so that they lie in vertical positions inside the bag and are separated from each other approximately the thickness of the folded chair. The bottoms of these walls may be turned and secured to the bottom wall of the bag by means of the lines of stitches 21' shown in Figure 3.

To protect the corners of the dividing walls I have secured strips of binding material 22 across the interior of the bag lines of stitches 23 so that these strips pass across the corners of the several partitions 19 and serve to protect these corners from being torn away from the bag as the chairs are placed into and removed from the several pockets of the bag.

I have shown five dividing walls 19 in the draw.-

ings but it will be understood that any other number of such walls may be provide-d. The number of such walls indicated in the drawings, divides the interior of the bag into six rectangular compartments 24 each one adapted to hold a folded chair. The upper edge of each dividing wall 19 is strengthened and protected by a strip of binding tape 25 which is folded over the edge of the walls and secured thereto by a line of stitches. Near the middle of each dividing wall, and just below the binding tape 25 there is a slot 26 cut through the wall. There is a strap 27 having one end secured as by stitching, to one of the side walls of the bag adjacent the plane of the tops of the several dividing walls, and this strap is adapted to be passed through the several slots 26 of the dividing walls and to have its free end tied to a loop 28 secured to the other side wall of the bag.

There is another strap 29 attached to the outside of the bag, as by stitchesBO, and this strap is adapted to be passed over the two end flaps 11, 12 when they have been folded down, and to be tied to a loop 31 which is secured to the opposite end of the bag adjacent the flap 4.

There is a strap 32 adapted to encircle edgewise around the entire bag and this strap passes through a loop 33 attached to the outer side of one of the flaps 3 and it also passes through loops 34 on one of the side walls of the bag. This strap is provided with a buckle 36 for securing the ends together after the bag has been closed. The portion of the strap lying between the loops 34 is adapted to form a handle by means of which the bag and its contents may be conveniently carried.

To receive the chairs, the bag is opened up, as shown in Figure 5, and it will be understood that the flaps may be turned down against the outside of the bag if desired. Folding chairs may be inserted into the tops of the several compartments 24 and allowed to slide down until the legs of the chairs rest on the reinforced bottom of the bag. One chair will be inserted in each of th compartments 24 so that there is a dividing wall 19 between the several chairs to prevent them from coming into contact with each other. After the several chairs have been inserted into these pockets, the strap 27 is threaded through the several slots 26 of the dividing walls and the free ends tied to the loop 28. This strap will extend across the several pockets 24 above the tops of the chairs and it will serve the purpose of preventing the upper portions of the pockets from sagging down and permitting the tops of the chairs to nib against each other. The bag being more or less flexible, this strap is desirable to prevent the chairs from rubbing against each 100 other as they might if the dividing walls were to sag near the tops of the chairs. The next operation is to turn down the two top end flaps 4, 5 as shown in Figure 4, so that they extend across the tops of the chairs. The strap 29 is then car- 105 ried across the two flaps 4, 5 and the free end tied to the loop 31. This secures the two flaps 4, 5 in folded position. The next operation is to fold the flaps 9, 10 over the flaps 4, 5 to the position shown in Figure 1, these flaps 9, 10 being 110 sufficiently wide to overlap each other. After the bag has thus been completely closed, the strap 32 will be in the position shown in Figure 1 so that it extends entirely around the bag, including the folded top flaps.

The outer strap may now be tightened to hold the bag completely closed, and this strap may be conveniently gripped between the two securing loops 34 to form a handle for carrying the bag and its contents.

The bag being made of a single piece, it is cheaper and more durable than if made of separate pieces stitched together. The top flaps are formed integral with the blank which is the simplest method of making them, and the binding tape 13 not only protects the edges of these several flaps but also prevents the bag from tearing at the lower corners of the several flaps. The real seam and the false seams cause the blank to fall into rectangular shape so that it is convenient to place the chairs in and remove them from the bag. The bottom of the bag which is subject to the greatest wear, is reinforced because of the double ply formed by the overlapping sections 6, '7 and 8. It is two plies thick at the ends of the bag. The folding chairs ordinarily have legs spaced apart so that they rest only on the portions of the bottom which are reinforced by the sections 7 and 8 and it is not necessary that the portions of the bottom wall between the reinforcement 7 and 8 be more than a single thickness, provided, of course, folding chairs are the only articles to be stored in the bag.

The flaps 4, 5 are securely held in folded position by the strap 29 and the dividing walls are supported at the top by the strap 27. The outer strap 32 which encircles the whole bag secures all of the flaps in folded position and. this strap is retained on the bag by the several loops 33, 34, 35.

Having described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A bag of the character described, comprising a body formed of side and end walls constituting a rectangular body, partitions secured within the bag and extending across the same to divide the interior into a plurality of parallel compartments, said dividing Walls having apertures near their upper ends and a strap member connected at one end with a wall of the bag and adapted to be threaded through said apertures of the partitions and adapted to have its free end secured to another wall of the bag for the purpose of preventing said dividing walls from sagging below the tops of articles disposed in said compartments.

2. A bag of the character described, comprising a single body blank of fabric having its opposite ends secured together by a real seam and having false seams extending along said blank at different positions to effect, in connection with said real seam, the shaping of said bag into a rectangular receptacle having side and end walls, partitions formed of sheets of fabric arranged in said receptacle and having opposite ends connected with the walls of said receptacle whereby said partitions lie in spaced, parallel relation to form a plurality of parallel compartments within said receptacle, reinforcing tapes secured along the top edges of said partitions, said partitions having slots therethrough arranged adjacent said reinforcing tapes, and a strap having one end connected with the wall of said receptacle, and adapted to be threaded through the apertures of said partitions and to have its free end attached to another wall of the receptacle for the purpose of preventing said dividing walls from sagging below the tops of articles placed in said compartments.

3. A bag of the character described, comprising a body formed of side and end walls constituting a rectangular body, partitions secured within the bag and extending across the same to divide the interior into a plurality of parallel compartments, a strap connected with the walls of the bag and adapted to engage with said partitions intermediate their ends and to prevent said dividing walls from sagging below the tops of articles disposed in said compartments.

P. M. FRIEDLANDER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2625973 *Aug 31, 1951Jan 20, 1953John J WeldonLaundry hamper
US2680460 *Jan 29, 1952Jun 8, 1954Sidney HymanLady's handbag or the like
US2705990 *Sep 8, 1953Apr 12, 1955Miller Reuben LVentilated tarpaulin
US5474185 *Feb 4, 1993Dec 12, 1995Deuter Sport Und Leder GmbhProtective packaging for furniture, electrical apparatus and the like
US5570829 *Jun 6, 1995Nov 5, 1996Harrison; RebeccaBackpack for carrying a foldable chair
US5586345 *Nov 9, 1995Dec 24, 1996Graco Children's ProductsMobile portable playyard system
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US5916828 *Oct 25, 1996Jun 29, 1999Graco Children's Products, Inc.Material for use in a canopy
US5961034 *Jul 14, 1998Oct 5, 1999Demunnik; MaryCloth box sleeve
US6007467 *May 8, 1998Dec 28, 1999Eastern Seaboard Packaging, Inc.Method for forming an insulating inner container
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US6749258Feb 14, 2003Jun 15, 2004Evenflo Company, Inc.Seat boot with cover
US7140773Dec 22, 2005Nov 28, 2006Frontier Paper & Packaging, Inc.Method and apparatus for packaging perishable goods
US7690503Apr 6, 2010Cosco Management, Inc.Product display and carrying bag
US20040232020 *Mar 5, 2004Nov 25, 2004Andrew HurstPackaging assembly
US20070071368 *Nov 28, 2006Mar 29, 2007Becker John WMethod and apparatus for packaging perishable goods
US20080217972 *Sep 4, 2007Sep 11, 2008Cosco Management, Inc.Product display and carrying bag
US20090173646 *Nov 28, 2008Jul 9, 2009Lilian BlombergCarrier - for Bottles and Such
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/38, 150/158, 206/326, 383/99
International ClassificationA45C11/24, A45C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C11/24
European ClassificationA45C11/24