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Publication numberUS1952096 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1934
Filing dateOct 24, 1931
Priority dateOct 24, 1931
Publication numberUS 1952096 A, US 1952096A, US-A-1952096, US1952096 A, US1952096A
InventorsSaffir Jacob A
Original AssigneeSaffir Jacob A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chi-ray film package
US 1952096 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 27, 1934. J, A, sAFFlR x-RAY FILM PACKAGE Filed OCT.. 24, 1931 Patented Mar. 27, 1934 X-RAY FILM PACKAGE Jacob A. Saffir, Rockford, Ill.

Application October 24,

9 Claims.

This invention relates to the packing of X-ray ilms and more particularly of such films as are adapted for dental work, and comprises a waferlike package adapted to be readily inserted into the mouth for taking pictures of the teeth and adjacent parts.

It is desirable to provide a lm package which will permit the developing of a standard nlm by the use of standard reagents without removing the film from the package, thus obviating the necessity of a dark room, dark boa, or the like. I have tried to develop a standard dental X-ray film in a standard package Without removing the same from the package, by dropping the wrapped iilm into a tray containing the developing solution and then transferring it to the fixing solution in the same marmer as X-ray films, unwrapped, are generally developed. I have found that this procedure is quite unsatisfactory. The solution reaches some parts of the film appreciably before it reaches other parts, resulting in an overdevelopment of some parts of the nlm and an underdevelopment of other parts. The wrapper also tends to adhere to parts of the nlm producing spots or undeveloped blotches.

I am aware that attempts have heretofore been made to provide an X-ray nlm package wherein the nlm could be developed without removal from the package. In order to overcome the above noted diiiiculties, and others, it has been proposed to support the iilrn in the package in spaced relationship to the top and bottom of the package, the spacing to be such as to preclude all possibility of contact between the iilm and the top or bottom of the package. Because of the spacing, the package is necessarily of appreciable thickness and cannot be used in dental work Where the package must be of a wafer-like form in order to permit insertion into the mouth. There are also other objections to the use of a thick package due to distortions that are produced in the picture.

It is an object of thepresent invention to provide an X-ray lm package or wrapping which may be made in a wafer-like form as standard dental iilms are now Wrapped, and yet may be developed Without unwrapping, thus obviating the need of a dark room, dark box, or the like. I overcome the difficulties heretofore met in attempting such developing by providing a novel wrapper for the lm. I have discovered that if the nlm wrapper is of moisture absorbing material, such as lter paper, blotting paper or the like, there will be a uniform distribution of the developing solution over the nlm when the pack- 1931, Serial No. 570,841

age is immersed in the solution. A similar distribution of the liquid will take place when the developed im is immersed in the fixing solution. I have found that a Wrapping of ordinary filter paper is quite suitable for this purpose. It is however to be understood that the invention is not limited to the use oi lter paper for this purpose since I may use any substance having the property of absorbing moisture in the same sense that a blotter will absorb moisture.

It is desirable to space the ends of the lter paper from the film. This spacing is very slight and may be obtained by interposing a frame of thin pasteboard or the like between the iilm and the wrapper. Instead of using a pasteboard frame the lead ioil backing usually present in X-ray iilrn packages may be used. For this purpose a somewhat larger backing is used and the ends of the foil are bent over the top of the iilm for about one-eighth' of an inch. Any other 75 means may be used to secure this small spacing.

The outside of the Wrapped iilm package is provided with an additional wrapping of Waterprooiing material to keep the inner contents dry when the nlm is inserted into the mouth for taking oi an X-ray picture. This outer` Wrapper is removed before the film package is immersed in the developing solution. At this time the inner Wrapping protects the iilm from light, hence this operation may be done in open daylight.

The attainment of the above and further objects of the present invention will be apparent trom the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing forming a part thereof.

In the drawing:

Figure l is a perspective view of my film package, with the parts in partially disassembled position;

Figure 2 is a transverse sectional view through the package with the wrappings thereof eX- panded transversely to illustrate the manner in which the package is wrapped;

Figure 3 is a similar view of a modif-led form of 100 package;

Figure 4 is a view showing the manner of Wrapping the package;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4 showing a later stage in the wrapping process;

Figure 5 is a plan view ci a rectangular pasteboard frame that is used; and

Figure 'i shows a modified arrangement intended to dispense With the frame shown in Figure 6.

sii

A detail description of my improved X-ray film package will now be given. The X-ray film is indicated at 1 and is provided with a backing 2 of suitable metal foil, such as lead or the like, as in the usual X-ray film package. A narrow rectangular frame 3 is placed on the sensitive side of the film 1 in order to provide a slight spacing between the Wrapper, to be hereinafter described, and the film at the edges of the film. The frame 3 is preferably of thick filter paper, although it may be of other material, for instance pasteboard or the like. The film with its metal foil backing 2 and its frame 3 is then Wrapped in a piece of paper 4, the edges of the paper being folded over the back of the foil 2. The paper Wrapping 4 that is selected for this purpose is of the type that readily absorbs water. For this purpose blotting paper or ordinary filter paper may be used. This wrapping produces a waferlike package of a size such as to permit its convenient insertion into the mouth for the making of X-ray pictures of the teeth or the like. In order to prevent moistening of the paper 4 by the moisture present in the mouth I provide an outer wrapping 5 of suitable moisture proof material. If the wrapping 4 is made of black paper and is light proof, then the outer wrapping 5 may be made of transparent material. Otherwise the wrapping 5 may be relied upon to exclude the light from the film although the first mentioned arrangement is preferable.

Io wrap the film in this package the frame 3 is placed upon the sheet of paper 4, substantially centrally thereof, and the film placed upon the frame 3 with its sensitive side against the frame. The backing of foil is then placed over the film and thereafter the corners of the sheet 4 are folded over the back of the foil and then the longitudinal and lateral sides are folded over, all as illustrated in Figure 4. The folded edges are on the back of the film and they are held in place by a sticker l() of paper or the like. This package is then placed upon the sheet 5. The corners of this sheet are then folded over the back of the package along the dotted lines indicated in Figure 5 and thereafter the longitudinal and lateral sides are folded over and the entire folded sheet secured in place by means of a sticker 11 of paper or the like. The sheet 5 is preferably made of cellophane, although other waterproof material may be used, such as waxed paper or the like, which may or may not be transparent.

In Figure 2 I have shown my X-ray film package somewhat expanded transversely in order to illustrate the positions of the different wrappings with respect to the film. It is to be understood that in my actual film package there is no appreciable space between the adjacent layers, eX-

ycept where the spacing is provided by the frame member 3. As a result my nlm package is very thin, being no thicker than the ordinary X-ray film package such as is now in standard use for dental Work.

.As previously stated, it is one of the main objects of the present invention to provide a thin wafer-like film package which may be used for dental work and may be developed without resorting to a dark room, dark box, or the like. With my film package this may be accomplished in the following manner. After the X-ray picture has been taken the outer Wrapper 5 is removed leaving the inner wrapper 4 with its seal 1e intact. This package is then dropped into a receptacle containing the developing solution and if left to remain there for a predetermined period of time necessary for the reagents to react with the substances provided on the film. The wrapping 4 is intentionally made of bibulous material in order that it may readily absorb moisture to provide a uniform distribution of the reagents over the face of the film. I have found that this bibulous material distributes the reagents uniformly over the surface of the film and prevents the formation of underdeveloped or overdeveloped spots thereon. The pasteboard frame 3 is of a thickness a few times as great as the thickness of the filter paper 4 and serves to space the edges of the paper from the film. Since the paper 4 is drawn taut it will remain spaced from the film throughout the area of the film until such time as it has become substantially saturated with the developing solution. In order to facilitate the action of the developer solution upon the contents of the package I may provide one or more small holes, as indicated at i5, in the back of the paper wrapping 4, that is, on the side of the wrapping adjacent the foil 2. The hole 15 facilitates the escape of air from the package when the package is immersed in the developing solution.

After the film package has been in the developing solution the desired length of time it is removed therefrom with its wrapping 4 still in place and is immersed in the fixing solution. After the film has remained in the fixing solution the desired length of time it is removed therefrom and then the wrapping 4 is taken off and the film Washed and dried.

The iilm of the present invention is developed in a standard manner, and with standard reagents, the only difference being that here we are developing a iilm while it is in its wrapped condition. Because the iilm is in its wrapped condition the developing can take place in open daylight. If desired the wrapped film may be moistened by immersion in water, before it is placed in the developer solution.

The entire wrapping 4 is of bibulous material although it is only necessary that the portion adjacent the sensitive face of the film be of bibulous material. It is within the purview of the present invention to use an ordinary wrapping in place of the Wrapping 4 by placing a piece of bibulous material upon the frame 3. In this event the provision of holes such as the hole 15, on the front as well as on the rear of the wrapper is optional.

If desired the frame 3 may be replaced by four corners of a frame as indicated at 20-20 of Figure 7. Those four corners of a frame are placed upon the wrapping 4 and thereafter the film is placed upon those four corners with its sensitive side facing the wrapping 4. The package is then completed in a manner previously set forth.

In Figure 3 I have shown still another arrangement for procuring a slight space between the bibulous material 4 and the sensitive side of the film. In this embodiment of my invention the lead foil is made slightly larger than the film and the corners thereof are folded over the sensitive side of the iilrn so as to form a frame around the film. This frame serves to space the wrapping 4 from the sensitive side of the film. The bent-over portion of the lead foil is indicated at 25. This portion may be around all four sides of the film or, if desired, may be only along two opposite sides. In other respects the film package shown in Figure 3 is the same as that shown in Figure 2.

IIO

From the description thus far given it is apparent that I have provided a film package which is useful for dental work and which may be developed in the open daylight. My film package is of wafer-like form, being no thicker or larger or heavier than the standard type of X- ray dental film now in use.

In compliance with the requirements of the patent statutes I have herein shown and described a few preferred embodiments of my invention. It is, however, to be understood that the invention is not limited to the precise arrangements herein shown, the same being merely illustrative of the principles of my invention. What I consider new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A lm package comprising a nat film, an enclosing wrapping of bibulous material enveloping the same, and means at the edges of the film spacing the bibulous material from the sensitive surface of the film to provide an air pocket over substantially the entire surface of the film and extending from the film to the wrapping.

2. An X-ray iilm package comprising a flat ilm having an inner bibulous light proef wrapping enveloping the same and secured in place to form an integral package, and separate therefrom an outer transparent moisture proof wrapping.

3. A film package comprising a flat film, a foil backing, the edges of the backing being folded over the face of the film, and a covering of bibulous material for the face of the lm, said covering being spaced from the lm at the edges by the foil folded thereover.

fi. An X-ray film package comprising a flat film, a proof backing therefor, a light proof wrapping for the lm with its backing, said wrapping being spaced from the edges or the lm and comprising a piece of filter paper, said light proof wrapping having an opening in the side thereof adjacent the light proof backing, said package being flat and of a Wafer form to permit insertion into the mouth.

5. An X-ray film package comprising a flat film, a light proof backing therefor, a light proof wrapping for the film with its backing, said wrapping being spaced from the edges of the film and comprising a piece of filter paper, said light proof wrapping having an opening in the side thereof adjacent the light proof backing, said package being flat and of a wafer form to permit insertion into the mouth, and an outer waterproof wrapping to protect the filter paper from mouth moisture, said outer wrapping being removable without disturbing the light proof condition of the filter paper wrapping.

6. A rectangular X-ray dental film package comprising a flat film, a light proof backing therefore, a sealed light proof wrapping for the lm with its backing, said Wrapping being spaced from the edges of the lm by a rectangular paper frame between the sensitive side of the lm and the wrapping, said wrapping comprising a piece of black, light proof filter paper bibulous and highly pervious to moisture and having an opening in the side thereof adjacent the light proof backing for facilitating the escape of air from the package when the package is immersed in a lm developing solution, said package being flat and of wafer form to permit insertion into the mouth for the taking of X-ray pictures of the teeth, and an outer independently sealed water proof Wrapping to protect the filter paper from mouth moisture, said outer wrapping being removable without disturbing the light proof sealed condition of the inner filter paper wrapping.

7. A light proof closed lm package having an X-ray film therein, and an outer moisture proof wrapping for the package, said wrapped package being fiat and of wafer form to permit insertion into the mouth for taking of X-ray pictures of the teeth, said outer moisture proof wrapping being removable to leave the first mentioned package as an integral light proof closed package, at least one outer wall of said first mentioned package comprising bibulous material whereby, upon immersion of that package into a developing solution, liquid may enter the package and come into contact with the film while the integrity of the package and the light proof condition thereof is maintained.

8. An X-ray film package comprising a hat fllm, a light proof backing therefor, a light proof wrapping for the film with its backing, said wrapping being spaced from the edges of the lni and comprising a piece of filter paper, said package being flat and of a wafer form to permit insertion into the mouth, and an cuter waterproof wrapping to protect the filter paper from mouth moisture, said outer wrapping being removable without disturbing the light proof condition of the filter paper wrapping.

9. An X-ray film package comprising a flat film, a light proof wrapping for the film, said wrapping including a piece of iilter paper extending over the sensitive surface of the film, said package being flat and of a wafer form to permit insertion into the mouth, and an outer waterproof covering over the filter paper to protect the filter paper from mouth moisture, said outer covering being removable without disturbing the light proof condition of the rst mentioned wrapping.

JACOB A. SAFFIR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5139148 *Jul 30, 1990Aug 18, 1992Agfa-Gevaert N.V.Daylight-loading film sheet package
US5884766 *Jul 21, 1997Mar 23, 1999Eastman Kodak CompanyRoom light load film magazine bag and cover loading system
Classifications
U.S. Classification378/169, 396/647, 378/182
International ClassificationG03C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG03C3/003
European ClassificationG03C3/00D