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Publication numberUS1952942 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1934
Filing dateJan 9, 1931
Priority dateJan 9, 1931
Publication numberUS 1952942 A, US 1952942A, US-A-1952942, US1952942 A, US1952942A
InventorsRoss David E
Original AssigneePurdue Research Foundation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Traffic lane marker
US 1952942 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 27, 1934. D, E. ROSS 1 1,952,942

TRAFFIC LANE MARKER l Filed Jan. 9, 1931 I 2 SheetsSheet lr 7 l v/ @num-mk March 27, 1934. D. E. ROSS TRAFFIC LANE MARKER Filed Jan. 9, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Mar. 27, 1934 PATENT OFFICE TRAFFIC LANE MARKER David E. Ross, Lafayette, Ind., assigner to Purdue Research Foundation, Lafayette, Ind., a corporation of Indiana Application January 9, 1931, Serial No. 507,725

Claims.

In modern road trailc, with lblinding headlights, it is very difficult for approaching automobile drivers to tell their own proper location on the roadway; this results in causing many 5 needless accidents and deaths. This is particularly true on roads with a dark surface, and on rainy nights, when all of the illumination from the headlights appears to be absorbed by the roadway. In order to eliminate this dangerous condition I propose to place a longitudinal series of my novel markers in the center line ofthe road and (also if desired) along the outer edges of the hard surfaced roads. These marks can also be used in roadways having multiple lanes of traic to clearly differentiate various traiic lanes. i

The primary object of this invention is to enhance the safety of motor vehicle traffic on highways particularly at night, by providing the highways with traffic lane markers so located in or along the roadway that the lights from the headlights of an automobile will pick up the markers and be reected thereby in such manner that the driver can readily distinguish the center of the road, and onthe part of the road to which he is entitled, and in which he can safely continue to' travel while passing Vehicles coming in the opposite direction.

A further object is to provide novel traic lane markers of such character that those for the right hand side of the road will not be picked up by vehicles approaching from the 1eft,` while those for the left hand side of the road will not be picked up by vehicles approachingfrom the right, and the operators of such vehicles will see only their own line of markers, and will not be confused by or with those by which the driver of an approaching vehicle is guided.

A further object of the invention is to provide traffic lane markers which can be embedded in and form part of the surface of a roadway without obstructing vehicular traine, and without liability to be injured by, orto hinder the use of Scrapers, brooms or other devices which may be employed to clean the surface of the roadways or remove snow and ice therefrom in winter.

To facilitate an understanding of the invention I will first explain some practical embodiments thereof illustrated in the accompanying.

drawings and the manner of using same, and

then summarize the novel features of the invention and novel parts for which protection is desired in the appended claims.

In said drawings;

Fig. 1 is a part top plan and part horizontal sectional view of one of the markers. Fig. 2 is a part side elevation and part vertical longitudinal section of the marker shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a transverse section on the linel 3-3 Fig. 1, and Fig. 4 a transverse section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a top plan view of another marker. Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section of such marker on the line 6-6 Fig. 5; and Fig. '7 is a transverse section on the line 7 7, Fig. 5.

Fig. 8v is a plan view of another marker. Fig. 9 is a side elevation of Fig. 8. Fig. 10 is a longitudinal vertical section of the marker shown in Fig. 8. Fig. 11 is a transverse section on the line 11-11 Fig. 8, and Fig. 12 is a section on the line 7.0 12-12 Fig. 8.

Fig. 13 is a diagrammatic view of a portion of a roadway equipped with such markers.

'I'he marker shown in Figs. 1 to 4 is especially designed to be placed in the center line of a roadway or between parallel traffic lanes Ain a roadway. It therefore has duplicate oppositely facing reflecting devices. The marker is preferably made of a very hard metal, capable of resisting steel tires, tractor wheels, road Scrapers and the like. 30

This marker comprises an elongated metal casting having openings 1 in each endfor the passage of a lagscrew, bolt or other means for fastening the marker in position in a roadway, and has enlarged recesses la at the upper ends of said holes for the accommodation of the heads of such fastenings. The sockets for the heads of the bolts or lagscrews are made sufficiently large for the use of a socket-wrench in bolting down or removing. The central portion of the marker is slightly higher than its ends but it is preferably tapered downwards from such raised central portion toward each end thereof, as indicated at 2.

These inclined surfaces 2 enable road` Scrapers, snow plows and the like to pass over the marker 05 without injuring it.

In each inclined surface 2 is a longitudinal recess 3 the smaller end of the recess being toward the center of the marker and such recess gradu- K ally widening and lessening in depth toward the end of the marker. At the inner end ofeach recess is a preferably downwardly inclined passage or bore 4 wherein is inserted a reilector R. The recesses 3 form troughs orvlanes opening toward opposite ends of the marker, so that the lights of a car approaching from either direction can enter one of the recesses and contact with the reector therein and be deected back in a way clearly visibleto the driver of the car although' the reflector is eectually protected no from injury. The bores 4 are preferably so formed that the reflectors R are protected on all sides. LI'he reflectors are preferably set at such an angle from a true horizontal that the reflected light ray (seeA Fig. 13) will be other than horizontal with the road surface. The reflectors can be securely fastened in the bores by cement, or other suitable means. The reflectors R may be of glass or crystal, suitably mirrored to give a very intense reflection of the headlights; but the particular construction of the reflectors is not a feature of the present invention.

Preferably an enlarged recess 7 is made in the underside of the marker adjacent to and communicating with both bores 4, to facilitate access to the reflectors R for removal or replacement. The marker may be further lightened by removing metal from its underside as shown at 5.

The marker is to be set in the roadway as indicated in Fig. 2 so that the top surfaces of its ends are flush with the surface of the roadway, but the central portion projects slightly above the surface of the roadway. The inclined 'surfaces 2 being in the line of the roadway are of low pitch and hard enough to resist the disrupting effects of metal cleats and metal wheels of farm tractors, steel wheel vehicles and the like and to cause the blade of a road scraper or snow plow to ride over the marker without injury thereto.

'Ihe marker shown in Figs. 1 to 4 has a very small projection from the surface of the road, and a low inclination of the inclined surfaces 2 to protect the reflectors. These surfaces 2 by the very nature of their shape are adapted to withstand the longitudinal trafc of the road.

The marker shown in Figs. 5 to 7 is in general similar to that shown in Figs. 1 to 4, similar parts being similarly lettered. In this marker however instead of the recesses 3 and reflectors R being disposed in alignment in the axial line of the marker the bores 4a are located adjacent opposite sides of the marker and each is further removed from its related end of the marker; and the recesses 3a leading up to the bores 4a. are formed partially in the top of the incline 2 and partially in one side thereof as shown. The reflectors R.

. are adjacent the sides of the marker, instead of in the center line thereof, and set at an angle not only to the horizontal, but to the center line of the road.

The marker shown in Figs. 8 to 11 is also in general similar vto that shown in Figs. 1 and 2, and similar parts are similarly lettered; but instead of the receses 3, as in Fig. 1 and 2 each recess 3b therein has a longitudinal central slot near its inner end in which is placed a reflector R having vertical steps for collecting the headlight rays. These reflectors may be fastened in place by means of cement or other adhesive medium, and the hollow spare underneath the reflectors may be filled with asphaltum or a tar product (indicated'at 8 in Fig. 10) The reflectors R' form the subject matter of companion application Ser. No. 507,726. The use of such reflectors enables me to further lessen the projection of the marker above the road surface, the projection of the marker shown in Figs. 8 to 10 being less than the projection of the markers shown in Figs. 1 to 9.

Each of the markers shown .provides a nonbreakable armored housing for the reflectors therein. Each is adaptedto be placed in hard surfaced roadways to identify trafllc lanes. I have shown only one reflector in each marker for each direction; but obviously if desired a plurality of reflectors would be used instead of one.

In the day time the line of markers can be used in lieu of paint or other markers to divide traflic. At night the markers produce a series of brilliant reflections from the headlights of every approaching car as indicated at M in Fig. 13, and such reflections will be as distinct to the driver as reflection from a cats eye in a dark roadway. On curves the markers can be arranged more closely, depending upon the radius of curvature. Divisions of multiple lines of traffic can be indicated by dierently coloring the reflectors in the line of markers between the different adjacent parallel lines of traffic.

If desired the outside lines of the roadway could be indicated by using half of the marker, as indicated at M1 and M2 in Fig. 13, as it would not be desirable for the side road markers M1 to have reflectors to catch the light approaching from both directions. Markers M1 corresponding to the right hand half of any marker shown could be used for the right hand side of the road; while markers M2 corresponding to the left hand half of any marker shown could be used as markers for the left hand side of the road.

The markers are primarily intended to be inserted in existing hard surfaced roadways in which case pockets must be cut in the hard surface of the roadway and holes bored for the insertion of extension sleeves and the use of lagscrews. In making new roads, pockets for the markers cold be formed in the surface as it is made, and suitable threaded members embedded in the roadway, threaded to engage the bolts by which the markers are to be secured in place.

I claim:

1. A traffic lane marker comprising a body adapted to be secured to the surface of a roadway between opposite lanes of traillc and having a portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway and gradually inclined downwardly toward the end of the body, and an open recess in said inclined portion beginning at a point adjacent the highest part of the projection and gradually enlarging toward the end of the marker, and a reflector adjacent the smaller end of the recess adapted to reflect the light of an approaching automobile.

2. A traffic lane marker adapted to be secured to the surface of a roadway between opposite lanes of traffic; said marker having a downwardly inclined portion projecting slightly above the surface of the roadway; and a recess in such inclined portion beginning at a point adjacent the highest part of the inclined portion and extending toward the end of the marker; and an elongated reflecting surface inserted in a slot in the bottom of the recess adjacent the said highest part of the inclined portion.

3. A traflic lane marker for the purpose specified, comprising a narrow elongated body adapted to be secured to the surface of a roadway to defne'the line between opposite lanes of trafllc and provided with openings for the passage of securing devices, and having a downwardly inclined top portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway, an open recess in the upper surface of said top portion extending substantially longitudinally of the body, and a reflector in the end of said recess adjacent the highest part of the top portion adapted to reflect the light of an approaching automobile'.

4. A traffic lane marker; comprising an elongated body adapted to be secured to thesurface of a roadway to define the line between opposite lanes of tra-nic; said body having a top portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway the upper surface of said top portion being downwardly inclined to permit passing of scrapers or vehicles thereover; an open recess formed in the top portion and extending from a point adjacent the highest part of the top portion toward the lowest part thereof, said recess becoming wider and shallower from its end adjacent the highest part of the marker to the other end thereof; and a reflector in the body at the inner end of said recess.

5.,A traiiic lane marker; comprising an elongated body adapted to be secured to the surface of the road to define a line between opposite lanes of trafc, said body having a top portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway, said top portion being downwardly inclined, an open recess in said inclined top portion beginning at a point adjacent the highest part of the top portion and partly opening through one side of the body; and a reflector in the body at the inner end of the recess.`

6. A traiiie lane marker; comprising an elongated body adapted to be secured to the surface of a roadway to define the line between opposite lanes of traffic;v said body having a top portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway, the upper surface of said portion being downwardly inclined from the center toward each end of the body; an open recess in the upper face of each downwardly inclined surface portion, gradually enlarging in width and lessening in depth toward the end of the marker; and reflectors in said recesses.

'7. A traffic lane marker comprising a body adapted to be secured to the surface of the roadway to define a line between opposite lanes of traffic; said body having a top portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway, the upper surface of said portion being downwardly inclined at opposite sides of the center thereof, and an open recess in each downwardly inclined surface each recess beginning at a point adjacent the center of the top portion and gradually enlarging toward the adjacent end thereof; a bore in the body at the smaller end of each recess, and reflectors in said bores.

8. A traic lane marker for the purpose specified, comprising a narrow elongated body adapted to be secured to the surface of a roadway, and having its upper central portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway and inclined downwardly toward Aeach end of the body, said body being provided at its ends with openings for the passage of securing devices, and also having an open recess in each downward incline extending from a point adjacent the end of the body toward the center of said projecting portion; andreectors at the inner ends of said recesses.

9. A traffic lane marker comprising a body adapted to be secured to the surface of a roadway to define the line between opposite lanes of traffic and having holes in its ends for the passage of fastening devices; said body having a top portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway, the upper surface. of said portion being downwardly inclined at opposite sides of the center of the body, and an open recess in each inclined portion beginning at a point adjacent the center of the body and gradually enlarging toward the end thereof, said body having bores connecting with the inner ends of the adjacent recesses, and reflectors in said bores.

10. A traffic lane marker comprising a body adapted to be secured to the surface of the road to define a line between opposite lanes of trafc; said body having a depression in each end to .receive alfastening, and a central portion adapted to project slightly above the surface of the roadway, said portion having its upper surface downwardly inclined at opposite sides of the center of the body, and an open recess in each inclined surface, each recess beginning at a point adjacent the center of the body and extending toward the adjacent end thereof and partly opening through the adjacent side of the body; and reectors at the inner ends of said recesses.

DAVID E. ROSS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4147447 *May 12, 1978Apr 3, 1979Amerace CorporationSnowplowable pavement marker and base member therefor
US4155666 *Jun 9, 1978May 22, 1979Amerace CorporationSnowplowable pavement marker and base member therefor
US4195945 *Nov 24, 1978Apr 1, 1980Amerace CorporationSnowplowable pavement marker and base member therefor
US4402627 *Apr 2, 1982Sep 6, 1983D. Swarovski & Co.Runner to keep off snowplows
US5454664 *Apr 7, 1994Oct 3, 1995Hallen Products Ltd.Roadway marker
US5839816 *Dec 13, 1995Nov 24, 1998Atsi, LlcFor insertion into a road surface
US6461077Feb 17, 2000Oct 8, 2002Hallen Products, Ltd.Reflector base
US7688222Feb 10, 2005Mar 30, 2010Spot Devices, Inc.Methods, systems and devices related to road mounted indicators for providing visual indications to approaching traffic
US7859431Jun 26, 2009Dec 28, 2010Spot Devices, Inc.Methods, systems and devices related to road mounted indicators for providing visual indications to approaching traffic
DE2719878A1 *Apr 29, 1977Nov 10, 1977Amerace CorpGegen beschaedigung durch schneepfluege geschuetzte pflastermarkierung
DE2719879A1 *Apr 29, 1977Nov 10, 1977Amerace CorpSchneepflugfeste fahrbahnmarkierung und verfahren und vorrichtung zum setzen derselben
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/16
International ClassificationE01F9/06, E01F9/04
Cooperative ClassificationE01F9/06
European ClassificationE01F9/06