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Publication numberUS1953288 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1934
Filing dateDec 12, 1929
Priority dateDec 12, 1929
Publication numberUS 1953288 A, US 1953288A, US-A-1953288, US1953288 A, US1953288A
InventorsMaurice L Caton
Original AssigneePatent & Licensing Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for and method of treating shingles
US 1953288 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M. CATON Z m -M H. W..H w a WmmWmmmwwwwwm x, x /M m M W v M 2 fir .y m x f M m k h w x & v Z M4. %W\\ \mw 7 Filed Dec April 3, 1934'.

- MACHINE FOR AND METHOD OF TREATING SHINGLES April 3, 1934. CATON 1,953,288

MACHINE FOR AND METHOD OF TREATING SI-[INGLES Filed Dec. 12, 1929 a SheetsShet 2 M. L. CATON April 3, 1934.

MACHINE FOR AND METHOD OF TREATIYG SHINGLES 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec.

wv Mb 0 eirzuarzfb'i Maurice I. 60162 April 3, 1934. r M. L. CATON 1,953,283

- MACHINE FOR AND METHOD OF TREATING SHINGLES Filed Dec. 12. 1929 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 w w K U Z April 1934- M. L. CATON MACHINE FOR AND METHOD OF TREATING SHINGLES i Filed Dec. 12. mag- 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Maa r z'ce Z. C0167:

M.'L. CAToN mwnnin FOR AND: METHOD OF-"TREATING surnames Filed Dec. 12, 1929 a Sheets-Sheet 6 Ap 3, 1934. pm. c 'roN 031m: FOR AND METHOD OF TREATING SHINGLES Filed Dec.- 12, 1929 a Sheets-Sheet '1 April 3, 1934. M. L. CATON MACHINE Fox AND METHOD OF wiwn me snmgma's' 8 SheetS-QSheet '8 Filed Dec; 12,- 1929 Mauricgl.

Patented Apr. 3, 1934 MACHINE FOR AND METHOD OF SHINGLES TREATING Maurice L. Caton, Chicago, 111., assignor, by mesne assignments, to The Patent and Licensing Corporation, Boston, Mass, a corporation'of Massachilsetts Application December 12, 1229, Serial No. 413,668

Claims.

The invention relates to the treating of shingles, and more particularly it relates to improved methods of weather-proofing shingles, or like articles, and to an improved machine for pract'cing the methods. 1

The invention contemplates-the feeding of untreated shingles into one end of the machine, 7

the shingles being carried by the machine at a constant rate of speed and discharged from the machine completely weather-proofed as a result of being subjected 'to a plurality of processes applied both manually and automatically while the shingles are traveling through the machine.

In. the weatherproofing of shingles as heretofore practiced, it has been found necessary for the operator or operators to handle the shingles at certain stages of the treatment and upon completion of the treatment to place the shingles in a drying rack, where they must remain for a considerable time before being arranged in bundles, the drying process being necessary toprevent the individual shingles from sticking together when arranged in bales.

An object of the invention is to provide an im proved machine and method of weather-proofing shingles or similar articles in which there is no intermediate manual manipulation of the shingles.

Another object is the, provision of a shingle treating machine operable to practice a, method whereby individual shingles are fed into the machine and subjected to a treatment comprising a plurality of steps, upon completion of which the shingles are discharged from the machine in condition to be immediately assembled and baled.

A still further object of the invention is 'the provision of a machine by means of which the desired steps of weather-proofing shingles are simpl fied, and upon the completion of the treatment the surfaces of the shingles are sufilciently non-cohesive to permit the shingles to be arranged in bales under pressure without sticking together.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view, drawn to a larger scale, along the line 5-5 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view, drawn to a larger scale, along the line 6-6 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view along the line 7-7 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view, drawn to a larger scale, of a portion of the device shown in Fig. .4; I

Fig. 9 is a large scale fragmentary sectional view along the line 9-9 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 10 is a view along the line 10-10 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a view along the line 11-11 of Fig. 10; Fig. 12 is a view along the line 12-12 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 13 is a sectional'view along the line 13-13 of Fig. 12;

Fig. 14 is a view along the line 14-14 of Fig. 1, drawn to a larger scale;

- Fig. 15 is a sectional view along the line 15-15 of Fig. 14;

Fig. 16 is a sectional view along the line 16-16 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 17 is a. sectional view along the line 17-17 of Fig. 16; and

Fig. 18 is a detail view of a portion of the supporting rail.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, the numeral 20 designates an endless chain conveyor traveling in a horizontal plane. The conveyor 20 extends the full length of the machine and is carried by a driven sprocket wheel 21 positioned at one end and'an idler sprocket 0 wheel 22 at the other end of the machine.

' ,The chain conveyor 20 is operatively connected with a motor 23 by means of a pulley 24 and a power transmission system 25. The power transmission system designated generally by the 9 numeral 25 is shown diagrammatically as comprising a plurality of operatively connected shafts, pulleys and belts arranged to step down the speed of the motor 23. No designating numerals are applied to the individual shafts, 1 pulleys and belts comprising the system 25, inasmuch as the system, as shown, is merely a diagrammatical representation of any suitable step down power transmission system, and applicant is not claiming invention in the transmission system, as such.

The transmission system 25 transmits motion to another transmission system designated generally by the numeral 25a whichin turn actuates a shaft 26 and a belt 25b which travels around a pulley 34 (Fig. 4) mounted onone end of a shaft 30. The shaft 26 actuates, by means of bevel gears 27 and 28, a vertical shaft 29, on which the driven sprocket wheel 21 is mounted. The shaft 30 rotates a pulley 31 operable to actuate a carrier belt 33.

A frame-work 35, comprising a plurality of vertical members 3'7 and 38, longitudinally extending members 36, and transversely extending members 39 provide a support for a back and for various other members comprising the machine. The vertical members 3'7 are shown in Fig. 1 as also serving as building posts or supports. It is obvious that the device may be assembled independently of such posts and that the construction of the frame-work 35 may be varied to suit the particular installation,

The carrier belt 33 and the chain conveyor 20 are kept continually moving when the machine is in operation. The chain conveyor 20, actuates a plurality of closely positioned carriages designated generally by the numeral 40, extending entirely around the conveyor 20 on a T rail 56. Each of the carriages 40 are preferably of a capacity to receive a plurality of shingles 100.

The shingles to be treated are placed upon-turn tables 105 within reach of an operator who stands on the other side of the belt 33 and places individual shingles on the belt so as to be advanced edgewise. At one end the belt 33 engages an idler pulley 32 carried in a member 43. The other end of the belt marks the location of a loading station hereinafter designated by the numeral 19, where a second operator is positioned to manually feed the advancing shingles from the belt 33 into the carriages 40 as they move by in horizontal position. The thin end of the shingles are fed into and clamped by the carriages 40 with the shingles projecting laterally from the car-' riages. The shingles are thereby conveyed edgewise from the loading station 19 by the carriages in a substantially horizontal plane for approximately the full length of the machine. Before the carriages 40 arrive at the idler sprocket wheel vertical position. The carriages 40, and the shingles 100 clamped therein retain this vertical riages 40 are again caused to swing down into vertical position upon leaving the unloading station and retain this position while passing the driving sprocket wheel 21. As the empty carriages 40 againapproach the loading station 19 they are caused to swing upwardly'into hori-' zontal position in a manner hereinafter more particularly described.

The shingles 100', in traveling from the loading station 19 to the unloading station 151 are each subjected to a plurality of processes which completely weather-proof the shingles and form non-adhesive surfaces, permitting the freshly treated shingles to beimmediately baled. The

upperface'and the butt end of the shingles. aretreated whilein horizontal position. The under face of each shingle is treated while the shingles are being advanced in vertical position.

The driving sprocket wheel 21 is carried by an end pedestal and track support constructed of in construction to the pedestal 41.

'three feet from the floor.

a plurality of structural members, generally designated by the numeral 41. The idler 1 sprocket wheel 22, positioned at the other end of the machine, is carried by a pedestal 42, similar The pedestal 42 is provided with a thrust screw 47to regulate the tension in the chain conveyor 20. I

- The carriages 40 move on a track positioned underneath the chain conveyor 20, the track preferably being positioned at approximately The' chain conveyor 20 comprises a plurality of links 91, from which fingers 45 are suspended at predetermined spacings. The fingers 45 are arranged in pairs, each pair operatively engaging a carriage 40, as best shown in Figs. 6, 12 and 13.

The track, on which the carriages 40travel, is preferably constructed of sections of a.T rail 56. The T rail 56 has its stem vertical for that portion of the track where the carriages 40 are in position to carry the shingles horizontally, as shown in Figs. 4, 5, 7, 8, and 13. The T 56 has .its stem horizontal for that portion of the track where the carriages 40 are suspended from the conveyor 20 in vertical position, as shown. in

plurality of L-shaped'angle iron supports 54 and angle iron hangers 55. The sections of the T rail 56 are-connected to the supports 54 and hangers 55 by a plurality of L shaped bolts, as is best shown in Figs. 4, 5, and 8. The supports 54 v and hangers 55 are connected to the longitudinal members 36 by any desired means, the weight of the track and the load carried thereby being thus transmitted to the frame-work support 35, of which the members 36 form a part.

The carriage 40 comprises a pair-of frames 58 oneach of which is mounteda trolley wheel 59,

so positioned as to engage one flange of the T rail 56. Guard rollers 60 are mounted on the frames 58 opposite to the'trolley wheel 59 in position to engage the flange of. the T rail 56. The trolley wheel 59 is rota ably mounted on a knuckle joint 61 and the guard rollers 60 are similarly mounted on stud bolts 62, as best shown in Fig. 8. ,It is to be noted that the fingers 45, projecting downwardly from the chain conveyor 20, engagethe outer edges of the frames 58. The frames 58- each have a riveted connection with a tie plate 80.

A transversely extending main frame 63 is similarly'riveted to the mid portion of 'the plate 80 in 1 such a way as to be substantially horizontal when the stem of the T rail 56 is vertical. The frame 63 acts as a vertical hanger from which the main portion of the carriage 40 is suspended when the stem of the T rail 56 is horizontal. The outer projecting'end of the frame 63'carries an underlying roller 65, which travels on arectangular 14o rail 68 when the frame 63 is horizontal. The rail some distance apart and thereby provide a rigid 45 )track for the carriage 40 as it travels in its horizontal loaded position. A thrust roller 77 is mounted on the pedestal 50 in a position to assist in carrying the weight-of the finger 72 and the shingles 100. An adjustment screw 78 is provided for varying the distance of the roller 77 from the T rail 56.

The clamping base 74 is fastened to the outer extremity of the frame 63 by aplurality of rivets 52. A plurality of grip fingers '72 are positioned in end to end relation immediately above the clamping base 74. Each of the carriages 40 is shown as having ten of the fingers 72, but any other desired number may be used. The fingers 72 are not a'tached to the clamping base 74, but each have a pivoted connection with a spring bar 71. The other end of the spring bars 71 are so connected with the main frame 63 as to permit the fingers 72 to move into and out of clamping relation withthe base 74. For this purpose a member 70 is provided having a pivotal connection 67 with the frame 63; The member 70 has a projecting lip 76, on the under side of which is mounted a spring bar supporting member 88 extending the full length of the carriage 40. The spring bars 71 are fastened to the under side of ihe member 88 by a plurality of rivets or bolts 83. Rotation of the member 70 about its pivot 67 will similarly rotate, or tend to rotate, the spring bars 71 and the fingers 72 pivotally mounted on the other end thereof; A trip finger 69 is also pivotally mounted on the main frame 63 by.'a pin 64. The trip finger 69 is normally locked in engagement with the member 70 by means of 00-" operating projections 96 and 97 formed on the,

finger 69 and the member 70, respectively. The

contact faces of the projections 96 and 97 are slightly inclined, as best shown in Figs. 7 and 13, so'thatthe projection 97 normally holds the fin-.. ger 69 in looking engagement with the projection 96 in the member 70. As the carriages 40 swing from horizontal position 'to vertical position and vice versa, in traveling from the loadingstation to the unloading station,,the fingers 69 are held in the full line position relative to the members 70, as

shown in Figs. 5 and 13. In this position of the 98 as best shown in Fig. 12. The cam 93 sepa-" rates the finger 69 and the member 70 sufficiently to release the finger from engagement with the member and to permit the finger to take the dotted line position shown in Fig.;13. The stationary cam 93 has a vertical cam face 94 which wedges between the roller 82, mounted on the upper end of the member 70, and the upper end of the finger 69. The cam face 94 engages the roller 82, and the opposite face 95 of the cam 93 i has a substantial inclination operating to disengage the finger 69 from the member 70. As the carriage 10 moves past the cam member 93 the member 70 is permitted to tilt slightly towards the T- rail 56 and thereby release the fingers 72 from clamping engagement with the thin edge of the shingles 100. In order that shingles may beheld firmly in position between the fingers 72 and the base 74, each of the fingers is provided with a pair of plates 79. The plates 79 are mounted on.

the under face of the fingers 72, and have their projecting edges serrated. The serrated edges of I advances.

the plates 79 permit the fingers 72- to take a firm grip on the shingles when the trip finger 69 is in operative engagement with the member 70. As the fingers 72 are released by the throw of the trip fingerm 69 to its dotted line position, following movement of the carriage 40 past the stationary cam member 93, the shingles are easily removed from the carriage, such release occurring adjacent the unloading station 151. ,The empty carriages 40 leave the unloading station 151 and ro- The operator at the loading station 19 feeds shingles from the carrier belt 33 between the fingers 72 and the base .74. Immediately after the feeding of the shingles into the carriage 40 at the loading station 19. the trip finger 69 is again brought into operative engagement with the member 70; thereby clamping the shingles in place between the fingers 72 and the base 74.

' The operative engagement of the trip finger 69 with the member 79 is accomplished by providing a cam support 87, mounted on the stem of the T rail 56 adjacent the loading station. A cam plate 86 is fastened on the support 87 in any suitable manner, as bestshown in Figs. 6 and 7. The cam plate 86 is positioned in the path of the inclined finger 69 and moves the finger 'to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 7. Oppositely posihorizontally extending U. The upper leg of the member 48 provides a mounting for a hingedc'am 85, so positioned as to elevate the advancing trip finger 69 from the dotted lineposition of Fig. M0 the full line position of Fig. 6 as the carriage 40 An angle iron.98 is fastened to the member 48 by means of bolts 99. A spring steel clip 84 has one end fastened in any suitable manner upon the angle iron 98, the other end projecting downwardly into contact with the free end of the hinged cam 85. Aguide 81 is also mounted upon the angle iron 98. A bar 192, fastened on the top of the guide 81, provides a mounting means for the hinged cam 85. The 'finger 69 passes between the hinge cam 85 and the edge of the guide member 81 as it is moved to locking engagement with the member 79. The lower portion of the guide member 81 is provided with a recess 103 having tapered side walls between which the guide roller 82 moves as the carriage 40 advances. The rela-' tive inclination and positions of the hinged cam 85 and the guide 81 is such as to bring the cooperating projections 96 and 97 into engagement as the finger 69 is moved into its vertical position.

The cams 86. and 85 cooperate to move the finger 69 into locking engagement with the member 70 immediately after the carriage has passed the unloading station. This locking is so timed as to,

clamp the. new load of shingles, which have been inserted in the carriage 40, between the fingers '72 edge-wise position, rest upon a pipe 91, so positioned that the shingle is substantially balanced, thereby relieving the thin edge of the shingle from the strains that would otherwise exist adjacent the fingers72 and the base 74. The pipe 91 is preferably connected with a source of steam supply, not shown, so that the portion of burners 110. The width of the oven 108 and the speed of the conveyor 20 are such that preferably -20' three seconds are required for the passage of a shingle therethrough'. The shingle is thereby dried and its pores opened in preparation for a priming coat of asphalt which "is applied to the shingles immediately upon leaving the oven 108. The asphalt is preferably 240 degrees melting point and is heated to approximately 360 degrees. In practice it is found desirable to heat the shingles before the application of the priming asphalt coat, as the asphalt when applied to a cold shingle 'ing out of the fibers.

does not penetrate the fibers. The priming coat of asphalt is delivered in the form of a spray through a horizontal pipe 112 having a plurality of small apertures in the under face thereof. A feed pipe 111 conveys the hot asphalt from a tank, not shown, to the horizontal pipe 112. The priming coat of asphalt, applied at the temperature of 360 degrees to the upper face of the heated shingle tends to.form a blistered surface on the shingles by reason of the air bubbles com- A pair of scrapers 113 is provided just ahead of the pipe 112 to remove all of. the excess priming coat and thereby leave the shingles impregnated with the asphalt and a vided to carry away the asphalt from the tank 115. A tank 116 supplies the heated material .for the final coat of asphalt. The tank 116 is connected with a source of asphalt supply by an inlet pipe 118. The hot asphalt from the tank 116 is delivered upon the upper face of the shingles in the form of a ribbon spray. A discharge pipe 120 forms a conduit leading from the tank 116 terminating a short distance in front of the scrapers 113. The end of the pipe 120 extends transversely of the machine so that the machine is parallel with the advancing shin-- gles. A steam jacket 121" surrounds the end of "the pipe 120, as best shown in Figs. 16 and 17.

' coat of asphalt evenly over the butt ends and the upper surfaces of the shingles, the surplus asphalt meanwhile dropping .into the drain tank 115.

The advancing carriage 40 next moves the shingles underneath a hopper-127, from which finely divided particles of slate are discharged onto the shingles. An elevator 128 is provided to convey the slate from a source of supply into a down spout 129 which'discharges into the hopper 127. The elevator 128 is shown diagrammatically and is preferably of the bucket type, although any other suitable means for keeping a supply of slate in the hopper may be utilized. The slate is discharged from the hopper 127, through an opening 133, by the rotation of fluted drum 130. e

The drum 130 is rotated by a shaft 131 through a pulley 142 and a belt 141 having a connection with a source of power, not shown. The side 132 of the hopper 127 is foreshortened-at the bottom in order to provide an opening 133 between the side and the drum 130.v The size of the opening- 133 is varied by means of adjustable closure members 132a and 132b, in order to regulate the amount of slate discharged upon the upper surface of the shingles. A plurality-of rods 140, equipped with thumb nuts 139 provide means for adjusting the closure members 132a and 13%.

For the ordinary length of shingle, as shown in I Fig. 14, the member 13% may be kept entirely closed. -In the event longer shingles or other articles are being treated, the member 1325 may also be opened in order that the upper surface of the article may have a sprinkling of slate particles deposited thereon throughout its entire length. A supplementary hopper 135 is connectedwith the down spout 129 by a spout 134. Some of the slate particles traveling down the spout 129 enter the hopper 135 through the spout 134 and are discharged onto a'table or platform 138 through a small discharge spout 136. A nozzle 137 on the end of the pipe 136 discharges onto the top of the table 138. The nozzle 137 is positioned sufliciently close to the top of the table 138 that a pile of ground slate is collected on the table and normally closes the nozzle 137.

The nozzle 137 is so positioned that the butt ends of the advancing shingles move through the pile of slate particles and receive a coating similar to the coating sprinkled on the upper surface of the shingle.

The pipe support 91 terminates a short distance beyond the slate sprinkling station at 'the point where the advancing shingles and the carriages 40 drop from a horizontal to vertical position. The end of the pipe 91 curves downwardly opposite the twisted portion of the T rail 56, the

curved portion of the pipe being provided with a plurality of step like projections 92 with which the butt ends of the descending shingles contact in turn as they advance. As the shingles drop surface and to the. butt end of the shingles, or

from one step projection 92 to the next adjacent they may be coated with an emulsified asphalt composition applied at normal temperature. The carriage 40 then moves. the shingles in vertical position around the idler sprocket wheel 22 and immediately baled shingles reach the unloading platform their inner faces are surfaced with mica.

As the carriages 40 approach the unloading station, they are again rotated into horizontal position by the twistedT rail 56.

.which extends the full length of the unloading station. The end of the guide rail 101 curves downwardly so that the advancing vertical shingles first contact with the outer edge. of the curved portion of the rail 101. The curvature and position of the rail 101 is suchas to assist in supporting the advancing shingles as they rotate from vertical into horizontal position. When the carriages reach their horizontal position, the clamping fingers '72 are released from the shingles, thereby permitting an operative stationed at the unloading station to remove the shingles.

set of pressure rollers 147, from which the shingles are discharged onto a platform 148. The rollers 147 areactuated by a motor 145 through the medium of a belt drive 146, shown diagrammatically in Fig. 1; The rollers 147 firmly imbed the slate particles in the coating of asphalt on the upper surface and butt ends of the shingles and imbed the mica in the emulsified coating composition on the under surface of the shingles. This rolladhesive surface. Operators, positioned one on either side of the platform 14B remove the shingles from the platform and place them on adjoining tables 149 and 150 in piles suitable for baling. By the use of 240 degrees melting point asphalt and the subsequent treatment of thesurface with the powdered slate and mica followed by the rolling process, the surfaces of the shingles are sufliciently non-adhesive as to enable the shingles to be immediately put up in bales without the shingles sticking together.- weatherproofing shingles heretofore adopted have been objectionable for the reason that the shingles, must be placed in a drying rack after the treatment, because if immediately baled they will stick together.

"Thus it will be seen that I have provided an improved method for weather-proofing shingles and an improved machine for practicing such method, whereby the capacity production of shingles per man has been greatly increased andthe shingles thus treated are in a condition to be without any objectionable adhesion. I

Having thus described my invention, it is obvious that various immaterial modifications may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of my invention; hence; I donot wish to be understood as limiting myself to the exact form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts herein described and shown, or uses men-' tioned.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: 4

1. In a machine of the kind described, a car.- riage, a trackon which the carriage is mounted, means operable to move the carriage over the track, mechanism alternately operable to cause the carriage to take horizontal and vertical positions, clamping mechanism on said carrier operable to engage shingles, and-means operable to discharge treating fluid on the upper face and butt end of said shingles when in horizontal position. A

The operative feeds the treated shingles through a The processes for 7and clamping means on said carriage operable to engage shingles to be conveyed along said track in alternately horizontal and vertical positions, an oven through which said shingles are conveyed by the carriage, and means operable to spray treating liquid on one face of the ad vancing heated shingles. 3. In a machine of the kind described, a carriage, a track on which the, carriage is mounted, means operable to move the carriage over-the track, means operable to hold the carriage in horizontal position on a portion of the track and in vertical positionon other portions of the track, clamping means on said carriage operable to engage shingles to be conveyed along said track in alternately horizontal and vertical positions,

an oven through which said shingles are con-'- veyed bythe carriage, means operable to spray treating liquid on one faceof the advancing heated shingles, and mechanism operable to sprinkle comminutedparticles on the treated face.

4. In a machine of the kind described, a substantially horizontal track, a chain conveyor in spaced relation to the track, a carriage operable to move along the track, means operatively connecting the carriage with the conveyor, trolley mechanism holding said carriage on the track and alternately causing said carriage to take horizontal and vertical positions, clamping mechanism on said carriage operable to open to receive a plurality of shingles arranged in edgewise relation, cam mechanism positioned in the path of the carriage operable to close said clamping mechanism, coating mechanism in the path of the shingles and a second cam mechanism positioned in the path of said carriage operable to open said clamping mechanism.

5. In a machine of the kind described, a substantially horizontal track, a chain conveyor in spaced relation to thetr-ack, a carriage operable to move along the track, means operatively connecting the carriage with-the conveyor, trolley mechanism holding said carriage on the track and alternately causing said carriage to take horizontal and vertical positionaclamping mechanism on said carriage operable to open to receive a plurality of shingles arranged in edgewise relation, cam mechanismpositioned in the path of the carriage operableto close said clamping mechanism, coatingmechanism in the path of the shingles, a second cam mechanism positioned in the path of said carriage operable to open said clamping mechanism, and an oven positioned intermediate said cam-mechanisms; said shingles being conveyed by the carriage through said oven. 1 6. In a machine of the kind described, a substantially horizontal track, a chain conveyor in spaced relation to the track, a carriage operable in the path of said carriage operable to open. said clamping mechanism, an oven and a liquid spray positioned between said cam mechanisms, saidshingles being conveyed by the carriage horizontally through said oven and beneath said spray for the purpose described,

7. In a machine of the kind described, a substantially horizontal track, a chain conveyor in spaced relation to the track, a carriage operable to move along the track, means operatively connecting the carriage with the conveyor, trolley said carriage horizontally through said oven and beneath said spray andhopper for t'he purpose described.

8. In a machine of the kind described, a substantially horizontal track, a chain conveyor in spaced relation to the track, a carriage operable to move along the track, means operatively con-' necting the carriage with the conveyor, trolley mechanism holding said carriage on the track and alternately causing said carriage to take horizontal and vertical positions, clamping mechanism on said carriage operable to open .to receive a plurality of shingles arranged in 'edgewise relation, cam mechanism positioned in the path of the carriage operable-to close said clamping mechanism, a second cam mechanism positioned in the path of said carriage operable to open said clamping mechanism, and-an oven, a liquid spray, a scraper, a second liquid spray and a hopper discharging a ribbon of powdered slate positioned in the order named between said cam mechanisms, said shingles being conveyed by said carriage through'said oven and horizontally beneath said sprays and scraper, the upper surface of said shingles contacting with said scraper for the'purpose described.

'9. In a machine of the kind'described, a track comprising a T rail, alternate sections -of said track having the flange of the T rail respectively horizontal and vertical, the sections of the track connecting said horizontal and vertical flange portions being uniformly twisted through substantially ninety degrees, a carriage mounted on said track, said carriage comprising a. frame extending transversely to said flange, a trolley wheel and a guide roller engaging opposite edges of said flange, a-member pivotally mounted on said frame, clamping mechanism operable to receive a plurality of shingles and comprising a plurality of fingers connected to said member by flexible plates, said fingers being positioned in end to end relation and movable by rotation of said member into and out of clamping engagement with said frame, a trip finger operable to lock said member in the position where said fingers are in clamping engagement with said frame,

cam mechanism operable to move said trip finger to release said clamping fingers from engagement with said frame, coating'mechanism in the path of the shingles and a second cam mechanism operable to return said clamping fingers totheir position of contact with said frame.

10. Apparatus for treating shingle elements comprising a conveyor, a track, a carriage at tached to said conveyor and supported on said track, means for clamping shingles to said carriage, heating means, coating means and surfacing means in the path of theshingles, means for opening the clamping means after the shingles have passed the surfacing means and means for closing the clamps before reaching thev heating n 11. Apparatus for treating shingle elements comprising an endless'conveyor adaptedto travel in a horizontal plane, a track, a carriage mounted on said track and fastened to said conveyor, means on said carriage for clamping shingle elements thereto, coating mechanism in the path of said shingle element, means for causing said carriage to assume alternately horizontal and vertical positions and means foropening said clamping means while the carriage is in horizontal position. 12'. Apparatus for treating shingle elements compr'sing a conveyor adapted to travel in'a hori-, zontal plane; a track, a carriage pivotally fastened to said conveyor and supported by said track, means for alternately changing the carriage from a substantially horizontal position to a substantially vertical iposition, means on said carriage toclamp a shingle element thereto, heating, coatng, and surfacing means the path of the shingle element clamped to, said carriage and means for opening the clamps to receive and to remove an element while said carriage is in a horizontal position. v

13. Apparatus for treating shingle elements comprising a conveyor, a carriage pivotally fastened to said conveyor a track for supporting said 11 5 carriage, clamping means on said carriage for receiving and holding shingle elements by one end, coating mechanism in the path of the shin gles' and means for supporting the other end. of the elements while said elements are in hori-'1 20 zontal position.

14. Apparatus of. the character described comprising a conveyor, a carriage pivotally fastened thereto, a track for supporting said car riage, clamping means on said carriage adaptedto receive and hold shngle elements by one end,

coating -;mechanism in the path of the shingle elements, meansfor causing the carriage to assume alternately horizontaland. vertical positions and means for supportinglthe other end 13 of the shingle elements while in a horizontal posi tion and while passing from horizontal to ver-' tical position. s

15. Apparatus o-f thecharacter described comprising a conveyor adapted to travel in a substantially' horizontal plane, a carriage pivotally fastened thereto, a track for supporting said carriage, clamping means on said carriage adapted to receive and hold shingle elements by one end,

coating mechanism in the path of the shingle elep MAURICE L. 'oAroN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3067060 *Jan 29, 1959Dec 4, 1962Ulrich Steinemann Ag LtdMethod and apparatus for curtain coating
US8015727 *Oct 6, 2004Sep 13, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Dryer rack
US20050102854 *Oct 6, 2004May 19, 2005Lg Electronics Inc.Dryer rack
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/58, 118/308, 118/314, 118/324, 198/803.9
International ClassificationB28B11/04
Cooperative ClassificationB28B11/04
European ClassificationB28B11/04