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Publication numberUS1954201 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 10, 1934
Filing dateJun 23, 1932
Priority dateJun 23, 1932
Publication numberUS 1954201 A, US 1954201A, US-A-1954201, US1954201 A, US1954201A
InventorsGoodyear Charles H
Original AssigneeFrank C Stettler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knockdown basket and similar container
US 1954201 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 10, 1934.

- c. H. GOODYEAR 1,954,201 KNOCKDOWN BASKET AND SIMILAR CONTAINER Filed June 23, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet l ATTORNEY April 10, 1934.

C. H. GOODYEAR KNOCKDOWN BASKET AND SIMILAR CONTAINER Filed June 23, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR (ar/m @aa yrdr BY ATTOR EY Patented Apr. 10, 1934 KNOCKDOWN BASKET AND SIMILAR CONTAINER.

Charles H. Goodyear, Portland, reg., assignor of one-half to Frank C. Stettler, Portland, O reg.

, Application June 23, 1932, Serial No. 618,881

1 Claim. (Cl. 229-46) My invention has for its object the providing of an inexpensive basket, or container, stamped out as a one-piece blank from a thin resilient sheet, preferably paper-board; adapted to :be set up readily, and when set up having its sides upheld by a simple hoop, preferably of wire, sprung into notches provided for it at the corners formed by the walls of the basket. Said hoop thus being ,1 held in place by the resiliency inherent in the up basket outward.

Such a basket is especially serviceable for holding vegetables and fruit. The cost of the material and of cutting out the blank for my basket is small; andthe setting up of the basket is so simple that it can be done by, anyone in a mo ment. It merely requires the sides of. the basket to be arranged'upright, the hoop then slipped over the sides into said comer notches, and the basket is ready for immediate use.

Incidentally, by reason of my basket being readily set up, it is not necessary to set up quantities of the basket in advance of requirement; thus my basket may be stored as a flat package of blanks and the basket set up as required. The blanks of my-basket take up very little room on the counter and are not in the way as would be a 'stack of set-up baskets.

I attain the objects of my invention by the particular type of blank shown in the. accompanying drawings, such blank being adapted to be set up with the wall portions upheld by means of a hoop secured in place, as above mentioned, and hereinafter more fully explained.

In the accompanying drawings:

- Fig. 1 shows a perspective view of the preferred type of my basket;

Fig. 2 shows the blank for making this type of basket;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged side elevation of said type ofmy basket;

Fig. 4 is a section on the line approximately pointed to by the arrow 4 in Fig. l;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmental plan section approximately on the line 5 pointed by the arrow 5 of Fig. 3; and 9 Figs. 6 to lLinclusive illustrate variations in the shape of my basket, and the blanks for mak ing the same.

50 Referring first to Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive; the blank p of my basket shown by Fig. 2 consists of a' bottom section a and sidewall sections 1), c, d and e. The side-wall sections d, e are made with flaps f, g and 11,1, respectively. The lateral edges of wall-sections b, c are given an outward flare, as

material, tending to spring the sides of the setshown by b, c, in Fig. 2, and the parts are scored, as at i, so that the parts may be readily bent in setting up the basket.

The corners formed by the wall sections d, e and their flaps f, g and h,.i are provided adjacent the top' with notches k arranged to be disposed in a horizontal plane, thus parallel with the bottom section a when the. basket is set up. The wall-sections b, c constitute spacing elements; their corners are cut away as at b2 and c2 to coincide with the notches 1c.

The cut-out spaces 1 merely represent air holes for the basket.

The hoop m, preferably made of wire, for the type of basket shown by Fig. 1 will be shaped rectangular with its perimeter slightly smaller than that of the basket. Thus, since the material of which the blank is made is resilient, and the tendency of the wall-sections of the basket when set up is to spring outward, the restraint of such outward spring by the hoop m causes the latter, when once seated in the notches k, to be firmly 'held therein. V

' Further, in the construction shown by Fig. when setting up the basket, the flaps of the sideso wall sections 11, e are lapped over the side-wall sections b, c which thus function as spacing elements holding the side-wall sections (1, e apart.- In setting up the basket, and slipping on the hoop, m, the wall-sections b, are slightly bowed inward, and when released tend to spring outward, and in that way hold the hoop m firmly in place in the notches 1c.

My invention, however, is not confined in its practical application to the particular type of basket illustrated by Fig.- 1, but may equally well be applied to a basket of triangular shape, as shown by Figs. 6 to 8 or of square shape, as shown by Figs. 9 to 11.

If the basket'is tobe of triangular form, it will consist of a blank shown by Fig. '1, consisting of a bottom section 0 and side-wall sections p. The side-wall sections are provided at one lateral edge with flaps q. The sections are scored as at r to facilitate the setting up of the basket. s are notches provided at the comers formed by the side-wall sections p with their flaps q to receive the wire band t; and the corners p of the wall sections 12 are cut away. The basket is held in its set-up form by springing the side-wall sections inward and placing the band t in the notches s, and the tendency of the wall sections to spring back outward holds the band in said notches: the band t being of no slightly smaller perimeter than that of the basket when set up. i

For the type of basket shown by Fig. 9, the blank consists of a bottom section 2, and sidewall sections 3, 3 and 4, 4. The side-wall sections 3, 3 are provided with lateral flaps 5, 5. The blank is scored as at '6 to facilitate setting up, and the side wall sections 3, at the corners formed by their flaps 5, are provided with notches 7 to receive the band 8, and the comers 4 of the wall-sections 4 are cut away. The setting up of this type of basket is similar to the setting up of the basket illustrated by Figs. 1 and 5. The flaps 5 of the wall sections 3 overlap Jhe wall sections 4, the latter functioning as spacers, holding the wall-sections 3, 3 apart. When set up, the tendency of the wall sections to spring back outward maintains the band 8 in the notches 7.

In either type of my basket the opposite wallsections may be provided with ears 9 to facilitate handling of the basket.

Other variations in the form of my basket are selI suggestive.

The lateral flaps of the wall sections of my baskets for cheaper constructions may be omitted,

butadd to the stability of my basket and are therefore preferred.

I claim:

A collapsible basket formed of a blank of resilient material foldable to provide a bottom and opposed side and end walls, the end walls having integral extensions to overlie and bear against the outer sides of the side walls when the blank is folded, the juncture of the flaps and end walls being formed with notches near the top edge, and an endless non-stretching band designed to be seated in said notches and overlie the outer surfaces of the side walls, end flaps and end walls, the side walls being cut away at points coincident with said notches to permit those portions of the band lying within the notches to overlie the edge of the side walls at the cut-away portions.

CHARLES H. GOODYEAR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2436271 *Aug 16, 1943Feb 17, 1948Simmons Jack WBottle carrier
US2527705 *May 27, 1946Oct 31, 1950Paper Strap IncPaperboard box
US2836339 *Mar 7, 1956May 27, 1958Virgil T PringleProduce display tray
US4187977 *Jul 3, 1978Feb 12, 1980Champion International CorporationTwo piece produce box
US4271964 *Oct 2, 1979Jun 9, 1981Reynolds Metals CompanyFolding carton structure
US5253802 *Nov 9, 1992Oct 19, 1993General Mills, Inc.Foldable, microwavable baking pan usable as a promotional device
DE102006013808A1 *Mar 22, 2006Sep 27, 2007Markus HeubelFolding container used for transport comprises a flexible strap element that partly surrounds the container on the side elements and is fixed with one end to one of the side elements
DE102006013808B4 *Mar 22, 2006Sep 4, 2008Markus HeubelFaltbares Behältnis, insbesondere faltbare Transportkiste oder dergleichen mit Spannelement
EP0265760A2 *Oct 13, 1987May 4, 1988Unilever N.V.Container having a bottom and folding-up side walls
EP0265760A3 *Oct 13, 1987Mar 8, 1989Unilever N.V.Container having a bottom and folding-up side walls
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/198, 229/115, 217/66, 229/114
International ClassificationB65D5/42, B65D6/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/4283
European ClassificationB65D5/42J1