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Publication numberUS1954788 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1934
Filing dateMay 19, 1932
Priority dateMay 19, 1932
Publication numberUS 1954788 A, US 1954788A, US-A-1954788, US1954788 A, US1954788A
InventorsChambliss Jr Edward L, Obernier Edgar H
Original AssigneeChambliss Jr Edward L, Obernier Edgar H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mold for forming apertures in concrete construction
US 1954788 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1934- I E. L. CHAMBLISS, JR., ET AL 1,954,788

MOLD FOR FORMING APERTURES IN CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION Filed May 19, 1932 Patented Apr. 17, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT? OFFICE MOLD FOR FORMING APERTURES IN CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION Edward L. Chambliss, Jr., and Edgar H. Obernier, St. Louis, Mo.

This invention relates generally to concrete-- construction. More particularly, our invention has reference to an aperture-forming mold and has for its prime object the provision of a simi ple, inexpensive mold that may with facility and convenience be employed for the economical and efficient production during the construction of concrete fioors, walls, and the like of apertures or openings therein for wires, piping, and other desired purposes.

And with the above and other objects in view, our invention resides in the novel features of form, construction, arrangement, and combination of parts hereinafter described and pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawing,

Figure l is a fragmentary sectional view of a mold embodying our invention, the shell thereof being shown as disposed and mounted on the 20 floor frame-work in preparation for pouring of the concrete;

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1, showing the concrete cast in or on the frame-work for enveloping the mold-shell;

Figure 3 is a generally similar view, showing the frame-work being stripped from the castconcrete;

Figure 4 illustrates the embedded apertureforming shell being removed from the formed aperture; and

Figure 5 illustrates the concrete-work after removal of the shell therefrom, showing the finished or formed aperture therein.

Referring now more in detail and by reference characters to the drawing, which illustrates a preferred embodiment of our invention, the mold A includes a hollow shell or sleeve 1 open at its opposite ends and preferably, though not necessarily, of circular or tubular cross-section, the wall of the shell or sleeve 1 being also preferably constructed of a spirally wound strip 2 of suitable material, as water-proofed cardboard, fibreboard, sheetmetal, or the like. Preferably, the helically adjacent edges of the strip 2 are seamed or adheringly connected at the spiral parting lines 3, the connection being effected suitably for preventing mortar-leakage between the strip edges while permitting parting or separation of the shell-wall at the seams 3. For such purposes, the edges of the strip 2 may be connected by a suitable glue-material, if the shell is made of cardboard or fiber, or by solder if the shell is constructed of sheet-metal. Should, however, the shell 1 be constructed of an otherwise constructed tube of the material selected, the wall of the tube may, while not here specifically shown, be suitably scored or weakened for enabling ready removal thereof from the formed opening, and it is to be understood that other methods of constructing the collapsible or removable shell 1 may be employed as will best serve the purpose.

Adapted for fiatwise engaging or seating on and over an end of the shell 1 for marginally overlapping the side-wall thereof and for providing an end-closure therefor, is a preferably discshaped cover or cap 4 constructed preferably of a suitable bendable or collapsible material, such, for instance, as card-board, fibre-board, or the like.

5 designates a fastening or tie-member, which, in the present instance, is preferably in the form of an elongated wire nail, the cover 4 being suitably apertured for snugly receiving the shank of the nail 5 with the head of the nail engaging the outer face of the cover 4 and the shank of the nail 5 having a length to extend through and beyond the opposite or lower end of the shell 1, as best seen in Figures 1 and 2.

6 designates a so-called head of disc-shape in the present instance for disposition within the shell 1 for rimwise snugly engaging the interior face of the wall thereof, the head 6 being centrally apertured for accommodating the shank of the nail 5 for axially centering the shell 1 thereon and with respect to the work.

In the employment of the mold during'erection of concrete-work, the conventional wooden frame-work or lagging B is built up for the purpose, for instance, of casting a concrete floor C, the center of the opening to be formed in the floor C being indicated on the upper face of the lagging B as by a suitable indentation or the like. The cover 4 and head 6 are suitably mounted on the nail 5, and the latter inserted in and through the shell 1, the point of the nail 5 being then placed at the mark prepared for locating the position of the mold A on the lagging B.

The nail 5 is then driven from above pointwise securingly into the frame-work B for both securing the cover 4 on the shell 1 and the shell 1 to the frame-work B, the shell 1 being endwise gripped firmly between the cover 4 and the frame-work B, the head 6 meanwhile taking a position adjacent the frame-work B for axially centering the shell 1 over, and thereby definitely locating the mold A at, the desired position on the frame work 8.

The concrete for the floor C is then poured or cast on the floor-form B, in which operation the cover 4, being firmly seated on the upper end of the shell 1, closes the same against entry of the concrete thereinto, and in like manner the firm bearing of the lower straight end of the shell 1 on the frame-work B prevents leakage of mortar into the mold around the bottom end thereof, while the engagement of the head 6 between the nail 5 and shell 1 not only reinforces the shell 1 against the pressure of the hardening concrete, but also effectively prevents displacement of the same during the concrete pouring operation.

After the concrete has hardened, the framework B is dropped or stripped in the usual manner, and the nail 5, being firmly fixed in the lagging B, follows the same as it is stripped from the floor C. In such movement, the head of the nail 5 is either pulled through the cap 4, permitting the ready removal of the cap, or the cover 4 is caused to collapse or fold around the head of the nail 5 and to be drawn into and through the shell 1, as specifically illustrated in Figure 3. Meanwhile the head 6 is engaged either by the collapsed cover 4 or the head of nail 5, and is also withdrawn from the shell 1 by and with the frame-work B as the same is removed from the fioor C, as will also be understood from Figure 3.

Most conveniently then from either the top or bottom of the fioor C, the adjacent end of the strip 2 is loosened and grasped by the fingers, as

shown in Figure 4, whereupon, with ease and facility, the strip 2 may be spirally unwound and withdrawn from the opening formed in the floor by the mold A, the wall of the shell 1 separating readily along the parting line 3, as will be understood, leaving a clear, smooth-walled opening '7 in and through the floor C, as shown in Figure 5.

In practice, the mold is particularly adapted for use in concrete construction having lagging merely on one side, as in floors and the like, for forming openings in the fioor for the passage of pipes, conduits, and other similar purposes. However, the mold may for like purpose be employed in concrete constructions having lagging on opposing sides, as in walls, columns, and the like.

The mold may be cheaply and inexpensively manufactured, is most conveniently usable, and is exceedingly efiicient in the performance of its intended functions. The mold, constructed as described, is not subject to expansion or contraction by atmospheric changes, and hence cracking of the cast concrete is obviated, and the sleeve or shell 1, if permitted to remain in the formed opening, functions as a cushion for the inserted pipes, wires, and the like.

If it is desired to use a sheet-metal form i'n'- stead of the wooden-frame B, the nail 5 may be replaced by an elongated bolt or like fastening element, a suitable aperture being provided in the metal-form for receiving the bolt, and it will be understood that other changes and modifications in the form, construction, arrangement, and combination of the several parts of the mold and the method of use thereof may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without departing from the nature and principle of our invention.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is,-

1. In a mold for forming an aperture in concrete construction, an open-end tubular shell of integral formation and uniform diameter for endwise disposition on the construction framework, a rendible disc for loosely fitting fiatwise on and marginally over the upper end of the shell, and an elongated nail for engaging the disc and the frame-work and extending lengthwise through the shell for securing the shell endwise on the frame-work, the disc being tearable for endwise removal of the nail through the lower end of the shell.

2. In a mold for forming an aperture in concrete construction, an open-end tubular shell of integral formation and uniform diameter for endwise disposition on the construction framework, a cardboard disc for loosely fitting fiatwise on and marginally over the upper end of the shell, and an elongated nail for engaging the disc and the frame-work and extending lengthwise through the shell for securing the shell endwise on the frameework, the disc being collapsible for removal through the lower end of the shell.

3. In a mold for forming an aperture in concrete construction, an open-end tubular shell of integral formation and uniform diameter for endwise disposition on the construction frame-work, a cardboard disc for loosely fitting fiatwise on and marginally over the upper end of the shell, an elongated nail for engaging the disc and the frame-work and extending lengthwise through the shell for securing the shell endwise on the frame-work, and a second disc fitting removably within and loosely rimwise abutting the inner face of the shell adjacent its lower end for axially, with respect to the nail, centering the shell on the frame-work, the first disc being collapsible for removal with the nail and second disc through the lower end of the shell.

EDWARD L. CHAMBLISS, JR. EDGAR H. OBERNIER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2659124 *Feb 23, 1952Nov 17, 1953Robert E HenryTemporary concrete form for use with plumbing installations
US2694847 *May 22, 1950Nov 23, 1954Christiansen William FAperture-defining form
US2836874 *Oct 12, 1955Jun 3, 1958Sonoco Products CoPaper tube concrete form
US2866250 *Feb 11, 1954Dec 30, 1958Ford Meter Box Company IncSingle use fiber board mold for water meter barrels
US2901810 *Jun 1, 1954Sep 1, 1959Fenestra IncPouring form for windows
US3004320 *Jun 8, 1959Oct 17, 1961Beckman Edward LApparatus for forming holes
US3917765 *Aug 30, 1973Nov 4, 1975Ecodyne CorpConcrete cooling tower
US4170853 *Sep 30, 1977Oct 16, 1979Raceway Components, Inc.Insert void forming device
US4515271 *Nov 17, 1983May 7, 1985Auciello Iron Works, Inc.Insert means for forming voids in concrete and method of applying same
US7487949 *Dec 5, 2003Feb 10, 2009Dayton Superior CorporationConcrete dowel void former
US7887735Feb 6, 2009Feb 15, 2011Dayton Superior CorporationMethod of forming a void in a mass of concrete using a dowel void former
Classifications
U.S. Classification249/61, 249/177, 138/96.00R
International ClassificationE04G15/06, E04G15/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04G15/061
European ClassificationE04G15/06B