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Publication numberUS1955101 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1934
Filing dateApr 7, 1932
Priority dateApr 7, 1932
Publication numberUS 1955101 A, US 1955101A, US-A-1955101, US1955101 A, US1955101A
InventorsSloan Francis P
Original AssigneeSloan Francis P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for compacting concrete or similar surfaces
US 1955101 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 17, 1934. 1,955,101

APIPARAIUS FOR COMPACTING CONCRETE OR SIMILAR SURFACES v F. P. SLOAN I Filed April 7.1932

INVENTOR: glea BY mmw kmtg rCM 4 ATTORNEYS Patented Apr. 17, 1934 PATENT )OFFICE- UNITED STATES.

APPARATUS FOR COMPACTING CONCRETE OR S SURFA IMILAR CES This invention is a novel apparatus for compacting concrete or similar surfaces, or machine for effecting repeated compressing actions upon any kind of a surface or bed. In the embodiment as herein illustrated the apparatus is especially adapted to the compressing or finishing of a bed of cement mortar, notably for compacting a layer of comparatively small thickness of cement mortar applied as a finished surface upon a hard or other sub-base or support; although the features of improvement are useful for many other industrial purposes.

The general object of the present invention is to afford a compacting apparatus of improved l5 efliciency and convenience of operation. In the case of treating a finishing layer of cement mortar the object is to insure an intimate or molecular contact between such top layer and the subbase, which for example may be of hard concrete, the action serving to fill all voids and expel air bubbles and drops of water so as to improve to the maximum the permanent union between the top layer and the base. A particular object is to afford a compacting apparatus of the kind operated by a 'vibratable mass and wherein the gravity pressure or total weight upon the surface to be treated may be increased substantially without impairing the efliciency of the vibratory action. A further object is to provide for adjustment of action to suit the character of the work to be performed. Other and further objects and advantages of the invention will be explained in the hereinafter following description of an illustrative embodiment of the invention or will be understood by those conversant with the subject. v

In the accompanying drawing Figure 1v is a side elevation, partly broken away, of a compacting apparatus embodying the present invention. Fig. 40 .2 is a plan view thereof, partly in section on the section line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

t The invention, in one aspect, may be described as a compacting apparatus comprising a base with its under side of substantial area adapted to rest upon the surface tobe treated; and an inertia weight of substantial mass movably mounted upon said base to be thrust or vibrated relatively toward and from the base, or with an up and down component, thereby to cause compacting vibrations or impulses of the base; together with a load or mass'of substantial weight comparable with that of the base, preferably heavier than the base, the same arranged in non-rigid relation to the base, or suspended in resilient relation thereto, whereby to impose continuously its weight as a supplemental gravity load or pressure upon the base, yet without adding or imposing substantial resistance to the vibration of the base; and a power operable actuator or motor of any sort forvibrating or actuating the inertia weight at sufficiently high speed to cause effective compactingvibrations or impulses of the base as it rests continuously upon the surface to be compacted, smoothed or finished. The resilient or non-rigid connection of the free or floating load to the base gives the effect that the total depressing weight of the, apparatus is effectively far greater than the portion thereof requiring to be vibrated by the motor and inertia mass to produce the compacting action; so that both of these advantageous actions, depression and vibration, are afforded to the utmost without mutual conflict.

Referring to the illustrated embodiment, resting upon the cement surface, bed, floor or other surface 9 to be treated is shown a base or bottom member 10 of the apparatus. This may be composed of metal or wood and its under side is preferably generally fiat, but with its under corners substantially rounded at all sides as indicated.

The inertia mass 11 by which the compacting vibrations are produced is movably mounted upon or above the base so as to vibrate relatively to the base or in an up and down manner, for example by rotating about an axis in respect to which the mass is unbalanced or eccentric so that during its rotary motions its up and down component constitutes an effective vibration reacting with the base to cause compacting vibrations of the latter. Obviously the single inertia mass shown may be duplicated or multiplied and the several masses may operate either in unison or out of phase in order to secure any desired particular reaction upon the base, or a horizontal reaction to assist the shifting of the apparatus upon the surface 9.

The'inertia mass or weight 11 may be driven by power through a motor 12 of any desired kind or type. For example the motor may be fluid operated, or a magnetic solenoid, but is indicated as a rotary electric motor. Such motor may be variously positioned, for example mounted upon the base as shown, or for that matter upon the suspended load to be described, or even at a remote point, with suitable flexible or universal connections to the inertia mass.

Preferably the motor driven inertia mass 11, is mounted above the base upon an upstanding bracket, frame or casing 13 which is rigid with bracket or casing and carrying the unbalanced mass 11. As shown the casing 13 constitutes the enclosure for the motor 12, the shaft 14 being the motor shaft so that the motor directly actuates the inertia mass.

the base, operates to impose a continuous gravity force or pressure upon the base, which pressure is always positive. At the same time due to the non-rigid relation the base may be vibrated without substantial resistance from the load ing action may obviously be or its inertia, the movement being small but the pressure being varied between positive limits.

The resilient load 15 and its mounting may be variously designed and located. The load for example may be subdivided and placed at opposite sides of the motor. In the construction shown theload 15 is built up of separate or removable sections or plates 16 resting upon a base section or shelf 17, so that the total weight of the load may be adjusted as desired, the shelf 17 having upstanding positioning pins 18 engaging with side notches 18a in the platesto position them, and with clamping nuts threaded on the bolts. By having the load in removable and replaceable sections or units its action may thereby be adjusted to the character or hardness of the surface under treatment; and the compactadjustable by varying the mass or throw of the inertia weight 11, or its speed of drive.

The mounting of the load 15 above the base may take various forms. For this purpose a skeleton frame is shown consisting of four upright posts 19 composed for example of light angle irons, each pair of which may be interconnected by a bent section 20 of the same angle iron, and the frame completed by a pair of horizontal tie rods 21, the horizontal members 20 and 21 forming'a square support from which the load may be suspended.

The resilient suspension ofv the load may be through a plurality of suspension springs 22, one being shown at each corner of the frame, these depending from the tie rods 21 and at their lower ends connected to depending extensions 23 of the shelf 17. The shelf is further shown as having at each corner a guide notch 24 running vertically on the adjacent post or upright 19.

This description substantially completes the machine with the exception of means for shifting it about the surface to be compacted. While such shifting may be effected by dragging or other action it is shownas readily accomplished manually by means of inclined handle bars 25 secured by angle pieces 26 on top of the base 10, with their outer ends in a convenient position for manual operation.

In practical use theentire apparatus may be shifted by sliding about the surface, which is facilitated by the fact that the base is under continuous forcible vibration, and the rotary movement of the vibratory mass is believed to facilitate the bodily shifting of the apparatus. When desired the apparatus may be tilted by lifting or depressing the handles to apply especial stress to certain parts of the work; and in some cases the base may be in the nature of a 1,966,101 the base, with a shaft 14 extending throughthehollow roller of light weight, with the devices located inside to elTect the vibratory and the gravity depressing actions.

In any form it is preferred that the base and the parts carried rigidly by it be relatively light, while the load having anon-rigid or resilient connection to the base is relatively heavy. To give a specific instance, the illustrated apparatus may comprise a base about 12 inches by 24 inches and the frame 15 inches high, the light baseand frame and rigidly connected parts, including the motor, weighing for example 100 pounds, while the supplemental load may be considerably greater, for example 200 pounds more or less.. This arrangement, with the vibrating means in rigid relation to the. base andthe'supplemental load independently mounted in non-rigid relation to the base, affords the double advantage of highly effective compacting action by the vibratory mass not rendered ineffective by the load, anda highly effective compressing or depressing action by the load, continuously and steadily applied through its mounting notwithstanding-the vibratory action. By combining the motor with the load, as by attaching it under the shelf 17, and connecting it by universal connections to drive the mass or masses, both the vibrating action and the effectiveness of-the load may be.

increased.

The principles may be variously embodied; for example the mass instead of being attached to the motor shaft may be thrust upwardly and downwardly, with either circular or reciprocating motion, for example by an eccentric or cam; the load maybe of any character; anelevated cradle or container may be provided, hung resiliently ,above the shaft with the load thrown loosely therein, or the load itself may be of a resilient character; and in any case the resilient or spring mounting may be supplemented by any known form of damping means to prevent undesirable vibration of the load.

Certain features herein described but not specifically claimed have been made the basis of copending application Serial No. 715,417, filed March 14, 1934, to which reference may be made for the particulars thereof, namely the feature of a roller as the base of the compacting apparatus,'the same rollable over-the floor during compacting, and giving support to the operating means; also the feature of the actuation of the inertia mass relative to the base in an up and down manner without revolution, that is, a linear reciprocation, as by a cam, eccentric or solenoid, giving a straight line reaction with the base.

Having described an illustrative embodiment of the invention and explained the much wider application of the principles involved, it is stated that it is not intended to limit the invention to disclose matters of construction and detail except to the extent set forth in the respective claims.

What is claimed is: 1. A compacting apparatus comprising a base of substantial area adapted to rest continuously upon the surface to be treated, an inertia weight of substantial mass movably mounted upon said base to be thrust relatively toward and from the base thereby to cause compacting impulses of l and a motor for actuating said inertia weight at a speed out of resonance with theload. 2. A compacting apparatus comprising a base adapted to rest continuously upon the surface to be treated, an inertia weight of substantial mass movably mounted upon said base to be thrust or vibrated relatively toward and from the base thereby to cause compacting impulses of. the base, a floating load of substantial weight comparable with that of the base mounted or sus-' pended in resilient relation to the base whereby to impose continuously its weight as a supplemental gravity load upon .the base without substantial resistance to the vibration of the base, and a power operable means or motor for vibrating said inertia weight at high speed, not in resonance with the load.

3. A compacting apparatus comprising a base, a motor driven inertia weight of substantial mass movably mounted upon said base to be thrust upwardly and downwardly thereby to cause compacting impulses of the base, and a floating load of substantial weight suspended in resilient relation above the base whereby to impose continuously its weight as a supplemental gravity load upon the base without substantial resistance to the vibration of the base.

4. A compacting apparatus comprising a rigid base with its under side of substantial area adapted to rest continuously flatly upon the surface to be treated, an upstanding frame in substantially rigid relation to the base, an inertia weight of substantial mass movably mounted on said frame to vibrate relatively toward and from the base thereby to cause compacting impulses of the base, a load of substantial weight comparable with that of the base and frame suspended in resilient relation above the base whereby to impose continuously its weight as a supplemental gravity load upon the base without substantial resistance to the vibration of the base. and a motor for vibrating said inertia weight at high speed.

5. A compacting apparatus comprising -a rigid base, a power operated inertia weight of substantial mass movably mounted on said base to vibrate relatively toward and from the base thereby to cause compacting impulses of the base, and a floating dead load of substantial weight substantially not less than that of-the base and frame, the same suspended in elevated location and in resilient relation to the base whereby to impose continuously its weight as a supplemental gravity load upon the base without substantial resistance to the vibration of the base.

6. Apparatus as in claim 1 and wherein the load is of separable sections removable and replaceable to vary the gravity depressing action thereof.

7. Apparatus as in claim 2 and wherein the load is of separable sections removable and replaceable to vary the gravity depressing action thereof.

8. Apparatus as in claim 4 and wherein the load is of separable sections removable and replaceable to vary the gravity depressing action thereof. 7

9. Apparatus as in claim 5 and wherein the load is of separable sections removable and replaceable to vary the gravity depressing action thereof.

FRANCIS P. SLOAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2446028 *May 3, 1945Jul 27, 1948Sponseller William JConcrete finishing device
US2466822 *Jun 23, 1945Apr 12, 1949Iowa Mfg CompanyEarth compactor
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US2687071 *Apr 23, 1952Aug 24, 1954Day William PRoad working apparatus
US2897734 *Sep 21, 1956Aug 4, 1959Bodine Jr Albert GSonic beam earth compacting system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification404/113, 15/235.5
International ClassificationE01C19/38, E01C19/22
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/38
European ClassificationE01C19/38