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Publication numberUS1955169 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1934
Filing dateAug 5, 1931
Priority dateAug 5, 1931
Publication numberUS 1955169 A, US 1955169A, US-A-1955169, US1955169 A, US1955169A
InventorsCharles F Bertschinger
Original AssigneeTide Water Oil Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cleaning crank cases
US 1955169 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1934 c. F. BEFH'fiCHHNGER 119955936 APPARATUS FOR CLEANING CRANK CASES Filed. Aug. 5 195]. 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEY A ril 17, 193% c. F. BERTSCK-HNEFIEH 1,955,159

APPARATUS FOR CLEANING CRANK CASES Filed Aug. 5, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTORNEY Apmfifl R 1 C. F. EERTSQKHHNGEZR 1,,559m9 APPARATUS FOR CLEANING CRANK CASES Filed Aug. 5, 1933. 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 ATTORN Y BY %%ENTOR r as clean as possible.

Patented Apr. 7, 1934 APPARATUS FOR CLEANING CRANK CASES Charles F. Bertschinger, Rosedale, N. Y., assignor of three-fourths to Tide Water Oil Company, Bayonne, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application August 5, 1931, Serial No. 555,265

23 Claims.

This invention relates to the emptying and flushing of lubricant cases, more especially the crank-cases of automobiles.

The object ofthe invention is to provide a comparatively inexpensive apparatus for emptying and cleaning crank-cases, and one which is easy to operate and which insures quick service. A further object is to provide a readily movable self-contained unit which can be brought to the automobile. Another object is to provide a visible apparatus, in which both the liquid withdrawn from and the liquid to be introduced into the lubricant cases can be seen. In the preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a tank part comprising a receptacle or reservoir for flushing. oil and a receptacle to receive waste oil. A transfer chamber, preferably a glass jar or a holder provided with a sight-glass, forms another part of the apparatus, this part preferably surinounting the tank part. A hose and nozzle for insertion into the dip-stick or other openings of the lubricant cases is connected with the jar or transfer chamber. Through another connection, old lubricant or dirty flushing oil can be discharged from the jar to waste, while another connection provides for the transfer of a charge of cleaning liquid from the flushing oil receptacle to the jar. Still another connection is preferably provided for returning flushing oil from the jar to the flushing oil receptacle, this connection preferably containing a filter. By means of valves the connections are selectively opened and closed so that oil withdrawn from the crank-case is delivered to a transfer chamber, where it is visible, before being discharged into the waste receptacle, and likewise a charge of flushing oil is delivered to a transfer chamber or inspection vessel before it is passed into the crank-case. In the preferred embodiment of the invention separate valves are employed, and these valves are grouped and are operated by a single manual control.

l'he flow of oil in the direction or path selected, from the crank-case to the transfer chamber means, or from the transfer chamber means to the crank-case or to the waste receptacle or to the flushing oil receptacle, may be effected in specifically different ways. In the embodiment of the invention disclosed herein, means are provided for alternately creating vacuum and applying air pressure in the sight-jar.

Other objects are to deliver a visible stream of the liquids in the Jar and to keep the glass For these reasons the oil inlet to the jar is preferably at the top, whereas the oil outlet is at the bottom. An induction pipe is carried to or into the upper part of the jar, its end or spout being preferably directed downward.

Other objects and features of the invention will .60 become apparent as the specification proceeds and from a consideration of the drawings illustrating the method and one embodiment of the apparatus.

In the said drawings, which form a part hereof:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of the apparatus, an enclosure being shown in section and intermediate portions of the hose and the tank part being broken out;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section taken on the line 2-2 of Fig.1, looking up;

Fig. 3 is a schematic view illustrating the connections anda form of valve mechanism, and. also indicating an engine and crank-case with the hose nozzle inserted therein, no attempt being '25 made, in this connection, to represent true proportions or relative positions;

Fig. 4 is a projected view of the cams of a carnactuated valve mechanism which may be employed; and

Fig. 5 is an elevation showing the operating knob with its indications.

A waste oil tank 2 is mounted on wheels 3 so that it can be moved, and preferably constitutes a body for supporting the remainder of the apparatus. A smaller tank 4, which is a reservoir for holding a supply of kerosene or other flushing liquid, is preferably disposed inside-the waste tank, the interiors of the two tanks being closed to each other. A frame 5 has legs 6 which rest on and are secured to the top of the tank 2, and 'a tight glass jar '7 is mounted on this bridge. The space between the top of the tank and the top of the frame 5 may be enclosed by a shield 8 to protect and conceal the connections and valve mechanism within.

A pipe 9 extends down in the flushing oil receptacle 4 to a point near the bottom, and two other pipes 10 and 11 open into the upper portions of the flushing oil receptacle 4 and the waste oil receptacle 2, respectively. To a connection 12 on the frame is applied a hose 13, terminating in a nozzle 14 for more convenient insertion into the dip-stick openings of crankcases. An air hose 15, which will be understood as being connected with an air compressor or compressed-air tank, is applied to another connection 15 on the frame.

Outlet piping 16 extends from an opening in the bottom head of the jar 7, and an induction piping 17 preferably passes up through said bottom head and terminates in a gooseneck spout; 18 beneath the upper head. A pressure and vacuum pipe 19 passing up through the bottom head also has its open end near the top of the jar.

Two branches of piping are connected with the ofl hose connection 12. One branch 20 is connected with a valve 21, to the other side of which the induction piping 17 is connected. The other branch 22 is connected with a valve 23, the opposite side of which is connected with the outlet piping 16. The first of these branches affords a path for old oil or for used flushing oil from the crank-case A, through the hose 13 and the induction piping 1'7 to the jar. The other provides a path from the jar, throughthe piping 16 and 22- and the hose 13, for delivering flushing oil to the crank-case, or for returning lubricating oil to the crank-case.

The pipe 9, through which flushing oil is raised from the receptacle 4, is connected with a valve 24, and the other side of this valve is connected at 25 with the induction piping 17. This allows flushing oil to be drawn from the receptacle 4 to the jar 7.

The outlet piping 16 from the jar has a branch 26 connecting with a valve 27, the outlet of this valve being connected with the waste oil receptacle 2, for discharge of old lubricant or used flushing oil to waste.

Another branch 28 of the outlet piping connects with a valve 29, the outlet of which is connected with the pipe 10 for returning flushing oil to the flushing oil receptacle. This path is serviceable for saving any flushing oil drawn into the jar but not used, or for returning flushing oil which has been used in a crank-case but is still usable. A filter 30 is placed in the pipe 10. This filter may be of a known type, and its presence, rather than its size or construction, is indicated.

The air hose connection 15 is connected with a throttle valve 31 having a handle 32 passing through the shield 8. With this valve the. operator turns the compressed air on and oil" and regulates the supply of the air to an ejector 33 or to the interior of the jar 7.

The valve 31 is connected with the jet of the ejector by piping 34, and the suction side of the ejector is connected by piping 35 with the pressure or vacuum pipe 19, the open end of which is disposed in the upper part of the jar. The exhaust end of the ejector is connected with a valve 36, the outlet of which discharges'into the atmosphere. When this valve is open, and when the throttle valve 31 is opened, a high velocity jet is delivered through the ejector nozzle 37 in the ejector, entraining air from the piping 35, 19 and jar 7, and the discharge being delivered to atmosphere. This creates a negative pressure or partial vacuum in the jar 7. When the valve 36 is closed there can be no ejector action and the compressed air passes through the piping 35 and 19 into the jar, creating positive pressure therein.

In the particular valve mechanism which has been illustrated, a plurality of separate valves are employed. This is a practical arrangement, though simpler constructions may be used. In this particular form of valve mechanism, the valves are disposed in line with their stems projecting downward, and a common operating shaft 38, journaled in the legs 6, is provided, this shaft having cams 21, 24 36 29 23 and 27 to act on the stems of the several valves. The projections of the cams 21 24, 29', 23 and 2'7 are in different angular relations, so that any one of the liquid paths can be opened without opening others. The cam 36 for actuating the air valve, or ejector valve, 36 has two projections, coinciding in angular positions with the projections of the cams 21 and 24", respectively.

The shaft 38 has an operating knob 39 outside of the shield 8, this knob bearing designations at proper intervals signifying "From Car, To Waste, To Car, Return Flushing Oil, and "Flushing Oil". A stationary index 40 is shown in Fig. 5.

In the particular embodiment of the invention which has been described, it may be assumed that all valves are normally closed by springs.

The manner of using the apparatus in the performance of the method of emptying and cleaning crank-cases is as follows: The unit is rolled to the automobile requiring crank-case service. The nozzle 14 is dropped through the dip-stick opening of the crank-case.

The knob 39 is turned to the From Car position, if not already in that position, thereby opening the valves 21 and 36, thereby establishing a path from the crankcase to the jar 7 and preparing the ejector to operate as such. The attendant then opens the throttle valve 31, causing the ejector to operate, producing a vacuum in the jar, which sucks the old oil out of the crankcase through the hose 13, valve 21 and piping 17 and delivering it as a quietly falling stream in the upper part of the sight jar. The outlet from the jar being closed the oil thus withdrawn is held in the jar. If on inspection it should appear to be still in satisfactory condition, it may be returned to the crank-case by turning the knob to the To Car position, whereupon the valves 21 and 36 close and the valve 23 is opened, and by again opening the throttle valve 31, which, the valve 36 being closed, causes air pressure to be delivered over the oil in the jar, forcing the oil through the outlet piping 16 and 22 to the hose 13. As indicated in Fig. 3, a valved draw-off 41 may be provided in connection with the outlet from the jar, for taking a sample of the oil for a viscosity test or other test.

Ordinarily, the old oil, after being drawn from the crank-case into the jar 7, is discharged into the Waste receptacle 2, this being accomplished by turning the knob 39 to the To Waste position, which opens the valve 27, all other valves being closed, and then opening the throttle valve 31 so as to apply pressure in the upper part of the ar.

The next operation is controlled by turning the valve mechanism knob to the Flushing Oil position, which opens the valves 24 and 26. Opening of the throttle valve 31 then causes the ejector to reduce the pressure in the jar, so that atmospheric pressure forces flushing oil up through the piping 9, 25 and 1'? into the jar.

Next, the attendant turns the knob to the To Car position, opening the valve 23, all other valves being closed, and opens the throttle valve, so that air pressure in the jar forces the charge of cleaning liquid through the hose into the lower part of the crank-case. The throttle valve is held open after all of the charge of flushing oil is in the crank-case, so that the compressed air boils up through the body of flushing oil, producing so thorough a disturbance that caked or gummy material in'the case is broken up and all solid or undissolved substances are held in suspension. This agitation is continued as long as is necessary,and ordinarily a brief period suifices,-and then the operator quickly changes conditions by turning the knob to the "From Car" position, thereby again opening the valves 21 and 36, all other valves being closed, and reopening the throttle valve,.whereupon the dirty flushing oil with suspended matter is quickly sucked out of the crank-case into the jar. Next the knob is turned to the To Waste" position, and the dirty flushing oil is discharged under air pressure into the waste receptacle, or the knob may be turned to the Return Flushing Oil" position, which will cause the flushing oil to be returned to the receptacle 4.

Obviously, the throttle valve 31 need not necessarily be closed after each step in the operation, to be reopened for each succeeding step.

While the preferred form of the apparatus and its mode of operation have been described in detail, it will be evident that numerous changes may be made without departing from the scope of the invention, its features and combinations, and it is accordingly desired that the description and drawings be considered as illustrative rather than limiting.

I claim:

1. A self-contained, transportable apparatus for cleaning crank-cases, including a hose and nozzle adapted to be inserted into the crank-cases, a tank part comprising receptacles for holding a supply of flushing oil and for receiving waste oil, a jar, meansfor alternately applying pressure and creating vacuum in said jar, permanent connections between said jar and said hose and between said jar and said receptacles, and a valve means for selectively controlling said connections to draw oil into said jar from the crankcase or from said flushing oil receptacle and to deliver oil from the jar to the crank-case or to the waste oil receptacle.

2. A self-contained, transportable apparatus for cleaning crank-cases, including a hose and nozzle adapted to be inserted into the crankcases, a tank part comprising receptacles for holding a supply of flushing oil and for receiving waste oil, a jar, means for alternately applying pressure and creating vacuum in said jar, con-,

nections between said jar and said hose for drawing oil from a crank-case into the jar and for delivering oil from the jar into the crank-case, a connection between the jar and the flushing oil receptacle for drawing oil from said receptacle into the jar, a connection for discharging oil from the jar into the waste receptacle, another connection for returning oil from the jar to the flushing oil receptacle, and a valve means for selectively controlling said connections.

3. A self-contained, transportable apparatus for cleaning crank-cases, including a hose and nozzle adapted to be inserted into the crankcases, a tank part comprising receptacles for holding a supply of flushing oil and for receiving waste oil, a jar having an oil inlet and a separate oil outlet, means for alternately applying air pressure and creating vacuum in said jar, connections for placing either said hose or said flushing oil receptacle in communication with the oil inlet of the jar, and 'for placing either said hose or said waste receptacle in communication with the oil outlet of the jar, and valve means for opening any of said connections.

4. Apparatus for cleaning crank-cases, comprising a sight-jar having an oil inlet and a separate oil outlet, means for alternately applying air pressure to and creating a vacuum in said jar, a source of flushing oil, a waste conduit, a flexible conduit having a nozzle adapted to be inserted into the crank-cases, connections for placing either said flexible conduit or said source of flushing oil in communication with the oil inlet of the jar, and for placing either said flexible conduit or said waste conduit in communication with the oil outlet of the jar, and valve means for opening any one of said connections.

5. Apparatus for cleaning crank-cases, comprising a sight-jar, means for ,alternately applying air pressure and creating vacuum in said jar, a waste conduit, a flushing oil conduit, a flexible conduit the end of which is adapted to beinserted into a crank-case, an induction conduit opening into the upper part of said jar, and valve means for connecting said induction conduit with either said flexible conduit or said flushing oii conduit and for connecting the bottom of the jar with either said flexible conduit or said waste conduit.

6. Means for cleaning crank-cases, comprising a hose and nozzle adapted to be inserted into the crank-cases, a sight-jar, a receptacle for waste oil, a receptacle for flushing oil, means for alternately applying air pressure and creating vacuum in said jar, and valve-controlled connections between said jar and said hose and between said jar and said receptacles.

7. Apparatus for cleaning lubricant cases, comprising a holder, a hose and nozzle adapted to be inserted in the lubricant cases, means for alternately applying pressure and creating vac: uum in the holder, connections for conducting oil from a lubricant case or from a source of flushing oil to the holder and for conducting oil from the holder to the lubricant case or to waste, and a single operating means controlling said connections.

8. Apparatus for cleaning lubricant cases, com- I,

prisinga holder, a hose and nozzle adapted to be inserted in the lubricant cases, means for alternately applying pressure and creating vacuum'in the holder, connections for conducting oil from a lubricant case or from a source of flushing oil to the holder and for conducting oil from the holder to the lubricant case or to waste, a plurality of valves controlling said connections, and a single operating shaft carrying valve-actuating elements for selectively operating said valves.

9. Apparatus for cleaning lubricant cases, comprising a chamber, a hose and nozzle adapted to be inserted in the lubricant cases, a compressed air conduit, an evacuation conduit opening into the upper part of said chamber, an ejector interconnected with said conduits, air valve means operable so as to apply pressure to or create vacuum in said chamber, connections for conducting oil from a lubricating case or from a source of flushing oil to the chamber and for conducting oil from the chamber to the lubricant case or to waste, and a combined selective control for said connections and said air valve means.

10. A self-contained, transportable apparatus for cleaning lubricant cases, including a tank part comprising a waste receptacle and a flushing receptacle, a transfer chamber, a hose and nozzle adapted to be inserted in the lubricant cases, a compressed air conduit, an evacuation conduit connected with the upper part of said chamber, an ejector interconnected with said conduits, air valve means operable so as to apply pressure to or create vacuum in said chamber, connections for conducting oil from a lubricant case or from said flushing oil receptacle to said chamber and from said chamber to the lubricant case or to the waste receptacle, and means for controlling said connections.

11 An apparatus for emptying and flushing lubricant cases, including hose and nozzle means j adapted to be inserted into the lubricant cases, a receptacle for waste oil, a receptacle for flushing oil, a jar, means for creating a vacuum in said jar when desired, valved connections between said jar and said hose means for drawing oil from a lubricant case into the jar and for delivering on from the jar into the lubricant case, a valved connection between the jar and the flushing oil receptacle fordrawing oil from said receptacle into the jar, and a valved connection for discharging oil from the jar into one of the receptacles.

12. An apparatus for emptying and flushing lubricant cases, including hose and nozzle means adapted to be inserted into the lubricant cases, a receptacle for waste oil, a receptacle for flushing oil, a jar, means for creating a vacuum in said jar when desired, valved connections between said jar and said hose means for drawing oil from a lubricant case into the jar and for delivering oil from the jar into the lubricant case, a valved connection between the jar and the flushing oil receptacle for drawing oil from said receptacle into the jar, and a valved connection for discharging oil from the jar into said waste receptacle, and another valved connection for returning oil from the jar to the flushing oil receptacle.

13. An apparatus for emptying and flushing lubricant cases, including hose and nozzle means adapted to be inserted into the lubricant cases, a receptacle for flushing oil, a receptacle for waste oil, a jar, means for alternately applying pressure and creating vacuum in said jar, valved connections between said jar and said hose means for drawing oil from a lubricant case into the jar and for delivering oil from the jar into the lubricant case, a valved connection between the jar and the flushing oil receptacle for drawing oil fromv said receptacle into the jar, and a valved connection for discharging oil from the jar into one of the receptacles.

14. An apparatus for emptying and flushing lubricant cases, comprising the combination of hose and nozzle means adapted to be inserted into lubricant cases. a tank part for holding a supply of flushing oil and a tank, part for receiving waste oil, a transfer chamber part, means for creating vacuum when desired in said transfer chamber part, connections between said hose means and said transfer chamber part and between said transfer chamber part and said tank parts, and valve means for controlling said connections so that either oil from a lubricant case or flushing oil from the first-mentioned tank part can be drawn into the transfer chamber part and so that oil can be delivered from the transfer chamber part either to the lubricant case or to the second-mentioned tank part.

15. A movable, self-contained apparatus for emptying and flushing lubricant cases, including hose and nozzle means adapted to be inserted into the lubricant cases, a tank part for holding a supply of flushing oil and a tank part for receiving waste oil, a transfer chamber part supported above said tank part, means for creating vacuum when desired in said transfer chamber part, connections between said hose means and said transfer chamber part and between said transfer chamber part and said tank parts, and valve means for controlling said connections so that either oil from a lubricant case or flushing oil from the first-mentioned tank part can be drawn into the transfer chamber part and so that oil can be delivered from the transfer chamber part either to the lubricant case or to the second-mentioned tank part.

16. An apparatus for emptying and flushing lubricant cases, comprising the combination of hose and nozzle means adapted to be inserted into lubricant cases, a tank part for holding a supply of flushing oil and a tank part for receiving waste oil,- a transfer chamber part, means for alternately applying pressure and creating vacuum in said transfer chamber part, connections between said hose means and said transfer chamber part and between said transfer chamber part and said tank parts, and valve means for controlling said connections so that either oil from a lubricant case or flushing oil from the first-mentioned tank part can be drawn into the transfer chamber part and so that oil can be delivered from the transfer chamber part either to the lubricant case or to the second-mentioned tank part.

17. Apparatus for removing oil from crankcases and for flushing the same, comprising a receptacle for holding a supply of flushing oil, a receptacle for receiving waste oil, transfer chamber means affording inspection of oil withdrawn from the crank-case and of oil to be introduced therein, a flexible hose terminating in a nozzle adapted to be inserted into the crank-case, connections between said hose and said transfer chamber means and between said transfer chamber means and both of said receptacles, a group of valves for opening and closing said connections, a single manual means for selectively controlling said valves, so that oil withdrawn from the crank-case is delivered into the transfer chamber means before being delivered into the waste receptacle, and also flushing oilwithdrawn from the flushing oil receptacle is delivered into the transfer chamber means before being passed into the crank-case, and means for causing oil to flow from the crank-case to the transfer chamber means, from the flushing oil receptacle to the transfer chamber means, and from the transfer chamber means to the crank-case or to the waste receptacle.

18. Apparatus for removing oil from crankcases and for flushing the same, comprising a receptacle for holding a supply of flushing oil, a receptacle for receiving waste oil, a sight-jar constituting a transfer chamber related to both said receptacles, conduits through which oil can be passed from the crank-case to said sight-jar, from said flushing oil receptacle to said sight-jar and from said sight-jar to the crank-case or to said waste receptacle, valve means for selecting any of these paths of flow, and means for causing oil to flow in the path selected.

19. Apparatus for removing oil from crankcases and for flushing the same, comprising a receptacle for holding a supply of flushing oil, a receptacle for receiving waste oil, a sight-jar constituting a transfer chamber related to both said receptacles, conduits through which oil can be passed from the crank-case to said sight-jar, from said flushing oil receptacle to said sight-jar and from said sight-jar to the crank-case or to said waste receptacle, individual valves for opening and closing said conduits, and a common means for selectively controlling said valves.

20. Apparatus for removing oil from crankcases and for flushing the same, comprising a receptacle for holding a supply of flushing oil, a receptacle for receiving waste oil, a sight-jar constituting a transfer chamber related to both said receptacles, hose and nozzle means through which oil is to be passed between the crank-case and said sight-jar, connections between said sight-jar and said hose and nozzle means, between said sight-jar and said waste oil receptacle, and between said sight-jar and said flushing oil receptacle, and valve means for controlling said connections so that oil withdrawn from the crank-case is delivered into said sight-jar and thereafter delivered to said waste receptacle, and a charge of flushing oil withdrawn from said flushing oil-receptacle is delivered into said sightjar before being passed to the crank-case.

21. Apparatus for removing oil from crankcases and for flushing the same-comprising a receptacle for holding a supply of flushing oil, a receptacle for receiving waste oil, a sight-jar constituting a transfer chamber related to both said receptacles, hose and nozzle means through which oil is to be passed between the crank-case and said sight-jar, connections between said sight-jar and said hose and nozzle means, between said sight-jar and said waste-oil receptacle, and between said sight-jar and said flushing oil receptacle, separate valves for opening and closing said connections, and a single manually operated means for selectively operating said valves so that oil withdrawn from the crank-case is delivered into said sight-jar and thereafter delivered to said waste receptacle, and a charge of flushing oil withdrawn from saidfiushing oil receptacle is delivered into said sight-jar before being passed to the crank-case.

22. Apparatus for removing oil from crankcases and for flushing the same, comprising a receptacle for holding a supply of flushing oil,,a receptacle for receiving waste oil, a sight-jar constituting a transfer chamber related to both said receptacles, said sight-jar having an oil inlet and a separate oil outlet, hose and nozzle means through which oil is to be passed between the crank-case and said sight-jar, connections between said hose and nozzle means and the inlet and outlet of said sight-jar, between the outlet of said sight-jar and the waste receptacle,. and between said'fiushing oil receptacle and the inlet of said sight-jar, and valve means for controlling said connections so that oil withdrawn from the crank-case is delivered into said sightjar and thereafter delivered to said waste receptacle, and a charge of flushing oil withdrawn from said flushing oil receptacle is delivered into said sight-jar before-being passed to the crankcase.

23. An apparatus for removing oil from crankcases and for flushing the same, consisting of a portable unit which comprises a tank part comprising two separate receptacles, one to receive waste oil and the other to hold a supply of flushing oil, a sight-jar supported above said tank part, a conduit having a hose and nozzle, a conduit extending down into the flushing oil re- 190 ceptacle, a conduit for delivering oil into the waste receptacle, connections between said conduits and the sight-jar, and selective valve mechanism controlling said conduits, so that oil withdrawn from the crank-case is delivered into the 105 sight-jar before it is passed to the waste receptacle, and also flushing oil withdrawn from the flushing oil receptacle is delivered into the sightjar before it is passed to the crank-case, and means for causing oil to flow from the crankno case to the sight-jar, from the flushing oil receptacle to the sight-jar and from the sight-jar to the crank-case or to the waste receptacle.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2432290 *Aug 20, 1942Dec 9, 1947Stewart Warner CorpCombination flusher and air filter cleaner
US2552749 *Feb 6, 1946May 15, 1951Tabet Mfg Company IncPortable oil pump and tank
US2603312 *Aug 13, 1948Jul 15, 1952 Apparatus for withdrawing oil from
US2609890 *Jun 15, 1951Sep 9, 1952Filtaire Products IncOil removal apparatus
US2612289 *Apr 6, 1950Sep 30, 1952Koester Frederick AAutomobile crankcase oil draining apparatus
US2635550 *Oct 3, 1949Apr 21, 1953Granberg Albert JManually portable crankcase drain pump assembly
US2647526 *Jul 17, 1950Aug 4, 1953Casady Philip MApparatus for cleaning open ended hollow tubular elements
US2661869 *Apr 30, 1948Dec 8, 1953Leonard R SimpsonOil changer
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US5492144 *Jun 29, 1994Feb 20, 1996Kriewaldt; GeorgeEvacuation system for removal of an operating fluid from a salvage vehicle
US5957170 *Nov 12, 1997Sep 28, 1999K. J. Manufacturing Co.Apparatus and method for changing oil in an internal combustion engine and simultaneously determining engine oil consumption and wear
US5964256 *Aug 19, 1993Oct 12, 1999K.J. ManufacturingApparatus and method for changing oil in an internal combustion engine and simultaneously determining engine oil consumption and wear
DE1099793B *Jul 24, 1957Feb 16, 1961Giuseppe DonatoVorrichtung zum OElwechseln, Waschen der OElwanne usw. von Kraftfahrzeugen, insbesondre fuer Tankstellen
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Classifications
U.S. Classification134/98.1, 222/205, 134/167.00R, 184/1.5, 134/102.1, 141/25, 134/113, 134/111
International ClassificationB60S3/00, F01M11/04
Cooperative ClassificationB60S3/00, F01M11/04
European ClassificationF01M11/04, B60S3/00