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Publication numberUS1956148 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 24, 1934
Filing dateJan 31, 1931
Priority dateJan 31, 1931
Publication numberUS 1956148 A, US 1956148A, US-A-1956148, US1956148 A, US1956148A
InventorsArthur R Elmendorf
Original AssigneeSafety Car Heating & Lighting
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lighting fixture
US 1956148 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. R, ELMEN IGHTING FIXTURE iled J 2 Sheets-g 2 INVEN R Patented Apr. 24, 1934 STTES iirrs PATENT OFFICE LIGHTING FIXTURE Arthur R. Elmendorf, signer to The Safety Woodbridge, Conn., as- Car Heating & Lighting 15 Claims.

This invention relates to lighting fixtures.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a lighting fixture which will be thoroughly practical and durable in construction. Another ob- 'ect of this invention is to provide a device of the above character which will be of economical and ready manufacture. Another object is to provide a device of the above character which because of the durability of its various parts reduces the possibility of breakage to a minimum. Another object is to provide a device of the above character certain of whose parts may be assembled automatically, thus reducing time and labor in assembly. Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character which, when in assembledcondition or in course of assembly, automatically adjusts itself to remain completely assembled continuously. Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character adapted to be used in vehicles such as railroad cars without certain of its parts jarring loose due to the inherent vibration caused by these vehicles when in transit. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

This invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts, as will be illustratively described hereinafter and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings in which are shown two of the various possible embodiments of the mechanical features of my invention:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a lighting fixture, certain of its parts being in section, and certain other parts being indicated diagrammatically,

Figure 2 is a cross section taken along the line 2--2 of Figure 1 showing the variousparts in operative position,

Figure 3 is a cross section similar to that of Figure 1 showing the position of the parts when being assembled or disassembled,

Figure 4 is a side elevation of another embodiment of my invention, certain of the parts being shown in section and others being indicated diagrammatically,

Figure 5 is a cross section taken along the line 5-5 of Figure 4 showing various parts in operative position, and

Figure 6 is a view similar to that of Figure 5 showing the position of the parts upon being assembled or disassembled.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

As conducive to a clearer understanding of oer-1 tain features of this invention, it may at this point be noted that various devices such as lighting fixtures, when installed in vehicles such as railway passenger cars, are subjected to considerable vibration and jolting, as when these vehicles are in transit and particularly when the railway cars are being coupled together. Thus, these flxtures are subjected to extremely hard use and moreover are often placed in positions where their various parts may be damaged. This is particularly true of the globes for these fixtures, which are commonly constructed of glass, and when struck or too severely jarred, easily break, thus necessitating replacement. Often these fixtures are positioned in almost inaccessible locations so that extreme inconvenience and trouble are experienced in gaining ready access thereto to make repairs or for purposes of assembly. In assembling the common form of fixture, various adjustments must be made to secure the globe to the fixture and later these adjustable parts may work loose due to vibration, causing annoying rattles and possible breakage. This invention aims to provide a thoroughly practical and durable device for overcoming these and various other difliculties.

Referring now to the drawings in detail and more particularly to Figure 1, there is shown a socket 10 supporting any convenient form of lighting device such as an incandescent bulb 11. Socket lflmay be supported in its operating position by any desired means and for this purpose I have byway of illustration shown a bracket 12 having a flange 13 of anysuitable shape to be conveniently secured to a fixed body such as a wall 14.

Secured to the other end of bracket 12 is a supporting member 15 suitably shaped according to the construction of various parts to be described hereinafter. Supporting member 15 may take the form of a canopy having at its lower end a flange 16 extending outwardly therefrom. Extending from the under surface of flange 16 on one side of canopy 15 is an L-shaped lug 1'? so constructed that its horizontal leg or projection 17a extends outwardly toward the periphery of flange 16. The upper surface of leg 105 or projection 17a extends downwardly and outwardly with respect to the horizontal plane of the under surface of flange 16. Suitably disposed at two other points on flange 16, and spaced from the center of socket 10 or canopy 110 15 by a distance preferably equal to the spacing of lug 17 from the center, are two L-shaped lugs 18 and 19. Lugs 17, 18 and 19 preferably lie in a circle and are spaced as shown in Figure 2. Lugs 18 and 19 are substantially similar in construction to lug 17 having horizontal legs or projections 18a and 19a respectively, extending outwardly toward the periphery of flange 16. The upper surfaces of projections 18a, and 19a extend downwardly and outwardly in a manner substantially similar to the upper surface of projection 17a.

I provide a light-reflecting and/or light-diffusing member 20 shown in the drawings in the form of an open-ended globe; it has about its upper periphery an inwardly directed flange 21 adapted to interlock with lugs 17, 18 and 19 as will be more fully described hereinafter. The member 20, hereinafter for convenience referred to as a globe, is yieldably distortable and may be conveniently formed from certain synthetic resins such as phenolic condensation product, which may be readily moulded. Such a material may be made transparent or translucent and also may take colorings from pigments suitable for coloring the emanated light or for purposes of ornamentation. As above noted, the globe has the property of resilient flexibility and may be distorted within certain limits when pressure is applied thereto laterally whereupon it resumes its normal shape upon the release of pressure.

When the fixture or support 12-15 has been installed, as for example in a railroad car, so

that flange 13 of bracket 12 is secured to some stationary object such as a wall 14, and a bulb 11 has been placed in socket 10, the fixture is ready to receive the globe 20. Globe 20 is related to the under side of flange 16 with flange 21 of globe 20 inserted into the space between legs 18a and 19a of the lugs 18 and 19 and the under face of flange 16. Globe 20 is then sufflciently distorted, by applying inwardly directed pressure at opposed points, as at points A and B in Figure 3, to distort globe 20 to assume the shape indicated in Figure 3, so that flange 21, upon slightly swinging globe 20, passes by the projection 17a of lug 17. Thus the distorted portion thereof may be slipped over the outer end of W projection 17a.

The upper surface of flange 21 is flat and is now substantially horizontal to correspond to the under surface of flange 16 but the under surface of flange 21 extends inwardly and upwardly at an angle to substantially correspond to the downward and outward inclination of the surface of projections 17a, 18a and 19a. Upon re lease of the pressure applied at points A and B, the globe assumes its normal circular shape, as most clearly shown in Figure 2, and flange 21 extends over the horizontal leg 17a of lug 17' to form a wedge fit therewith. A similar wedge fit is achieved with lugs 18 and 19. Flange 21 preferably does not extend the whole way along the upper inclined surfaces of projections 17a, 18a

and 1%, being wedged into its normal or final position, but the elastic property of the material of which globe 20 is made, insures the exerting of a constant pressure inwardly against the lugs so that a close fit between flange 16 of the canopy l5 and flange 21 of globe 20 is assured through the coaction of flange 21 and lugs 17, 18 and 19. In this manner I provide a self-adjusting action which takes up any slack which may develop in the fixture, and also assures a tight connection between the globe and the fixture at all times. Various vibrations in the car while in transit thus cannot loosen or damage the parts because of this automatic selfadjusting action. Also less precision of manufacture need be exercised. Furthermore, because of the extreme durability of the globe, all possibility of breakage is greatly reduced.

To more adequately meet certain peculiar conditions met with in practice, I provide another embodiment of certain features of my invention as shown in Figures 4, 5 and 6. In this embodiment, the socket 16 supporting the bulb 11 is in turn supported by a bracket 12 secured to a wall 14 by means of a flange 13 in a manner substantially similar to that described in connection with Figure 1. A canopy 15 having a peripheral flange 16 is secured to bracket 12 in a manner as hereinbefore described.

Extending from the under surface of flange 16 is an L-shaped lug 22 having its horizontal leg or projection 22a extending inwardly towards socket 10. The upper surface of projection 22a extends inwardly and downwardly with respect to the substantially horizontal plane of the under surface of flange 16. As is more clearly shown in Figure 5, two other lugs 23 and 24 are disposed at suitable points on flange 16 having projections 23a and 24a; these are of a construction similar to that of lug 22. The three lugs lie preferably in a circle (see Figures 5 and 6).

A globe 25 of any suitable shape to be secured to the fixture or support is formed of a yield-- able distortable substance preferably similar in composition to that already described with reference to the preferred embodiment of my invention. Thus this globe has the dual property of elasticity and durability so that it may be distorted and assembled in a manner to be described hereinafter and so that it may resist various shocks met with in practice with small possibility of breakage.

A flange 26 extends outwardly from the upper periphery of globe 25 and has a flat upper surface substantially corresponding to the fiat or plane under surface of flange 16. The under surface of flange 26 extends outwardly and upwardly at an angle substantially the same as the inclination of the upper surfaces of the horizontal legs of the lugs 22, 23 and 24. To

assemble globe 25 to canopy 15, flange 26 is inserted into the angular space between the horizontal legs of lugs 23 and 24 and the under sunface of flange 16 of canopy 15. Then pressure is applied at points 0 and D, as is more. clearly shown in Figure 6, globe 25 is distorted into the shape shown in Figure 6, whence it may be swung upwardly, flange 26 clearing or by-pas'sing leg 22a of lug 22, and flange 26 seating itself against the under face of flange 16 of canopy 15. Upon the release of the pressure, the globe assumes its normal. position as shown in Figure 5, and flange 26 extends between the extending portion 22a of lug 22 and the under surface of flange 16 to form a, wedge fit therewith. A similar wedging action simultaneously ensues as flange 26 extends inwardly between flange 16 and the projections 23a and 24a of lugs 23 and 24. The elastic action of globe 25 exerts a pressure on flange 26 so that the wedging action between this flange and the projections 22a, 23a and 24a is continuous.

It will thus be seen that, in either form, the possibility of disassembly because of vibration or other forms of shock is reduced to a minimum, as is breakage of the various partsof' the fixture;

also rattling or loosening up is prevented. Furthermore, these globes may be installed in the fixtures with little labor; the only labor neces sary for assembly is the application of a small amount of pressure while fitting the flange of the globe within the lugs and the subsequent release thereof so that the other portion of the fiange may be interengaged with the other lug. On the other hand, if disassembly is necessary at any time, this action is correspondin ly simple, as pressure is required at only two opposite portions of the globe to achieve suificient distortion to eifect its release from the support or fixture.

It will be seen that I have provided in this invention a lighting fixture having many practical as well as economical advantages. By employing a globe of shock-resisting material, I have greatly increased the durability of the entire lighting fixture for the globe forms a comparatively large part thereof. Furthermore, because of the elasticity of the globe and the unique wedging action between the support and the globe, the possibility of loosening up of the coacting parts and subsequent bothersome and noisy rattling are prevented. The extremely simple method of assembly also reduces the amount of labor necessary for initial installment and subsequent repair or replacement of either the globe or the lamp itself.

It will thus be seen that I have provided an entirely practical and efiicient device in which the several objects and advantages hereinabove set forth, as well as many others, are successfully achieved.

In using the term globe, I do not intend to import any undue limitation but mean to include therein any light-affecting shade, globe, reflector or the like, whether it is used for lightreflecting or light-diffusing or for purposes mainly 01" ornamentation.

As many possible embodiments may be made in the above invention and as many changes might be made in the embodiment above set forth, it is to be understood that all matter hereinbefore set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture adapted to receive an illuminating bulb, a substantially cylindrical globe formed from a yieldable distortable self-sustaining translucent material, and means on said lighting fixture adapted to secure said globe to said fixture out of engagement with said bulb, said means interfitting with said globe when said globe is in its normal shape and being disengaged therefrom when said globe is distorted.

2. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture including an illuminating bulb, a hollow globe formed from selfsustaining translucent material and having one end open larger in cross-section than any crosssection of the bulb, said globe being capable of temporary distortion, and securing means on said fixture which said globe may by-pass when distorted and adapted to interlock with said globe upon said globe assuming its normal shape, said globe being out of engagement with said bulb when interlocked witl said securing means.

3. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture adapted to hold an illuminating bulb, a hollow globe formed from translucent material having the inherent characteristic of retaining its shape and having one end open larger in crosssection than any cross-section of said bulb, said globe being capable of temporary distortion, and securing means on said fixture i terfitting with said globe, said globe being out of engagement with said securing means and said bulb when distorted and out of engagement with said bulb when interfitted with said securing means.

4. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture adapted to hold an illuminating bulb, a hollow globe formed from a yieldable distortable material which has the inherent characteristic of retaining its shape and having one end open larger in cross-section than any cross-section of said bulb, and means for securing said globe to said fixture out of engagement with said bulb when said globe assumes its normal shape and for releasing said globe from fixture when said globe is distorted.

5. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture including an illuminating bulb, a hollow globe formed from yieldable translucent material having the inherent characteristic of retaining its shape, and means holding said globe to said fixture out of engagement with said bulb adapted to be rendered ineffective upon the distortion of said globe thereby permitting the removal of said globe from said lighting fixture while said bulb is in its operative position.

6. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture, means associated with said lighting fixture providing wedge-shaped recesses thereon, and a globe formed from a yieldable material having an outwardly extending an nular flange substantially at one end thereof, said flange adapted to be seated in said recesses upon the distortion of said globe and to form a wedging interlock therewith when the globe assumes its normal shape.

7. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture, a series of parts secured to said lighting fixture and forming wedge-shaped recesses peripherally disposed upon said fixture, and a globe formed from yieldable material and having an annular fiange substantially near one end thereof, said flange adapted to be disposed in registry with said recesses when said globe is distorted and to form a wedge fit with said recesses when said globe assumes its normal shape.

8. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture, means secured to said lighting fixture forming wedge-shaped recesses, a yieldably distortable globe, and means secured to said globe adapted .to form a wedge fit with said recesses when said globe is in its normal position.

9. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture, lugs extending from said lighting fixture, and distortable lightaffecting means for said fixture shaped for interlocking engagement with said lugs and being out of interlocking engagement with said lugs when distorted.

10. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture, means including light-directing means for said fixture and having a portion that is yieldable, lugs extending from said fixture, and a flange on said yieldable portion of said light-directing means, said flange being adapted to by-pass at least one of said lugs upon the distortion of said yieldable portion and adapted to interlock with said lugs upon said portion assuming its normal shape.

11. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture including an illuminating bulb, a hollow globe for said fixture formed from yieldable and translucent material and having one end open larger in cross-section than any cross-section of said bulb, and an inwardly directed distortable flange on said globe, said flange interlocking with said fixture to hold said globe thereon out of engagement With said bulb and adapted to be disengaged from said fixture upon the distortion of said flange.

12. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture including an illuminating bulb, a hollow distortable globe formed from self-sustaining translucent material having an open end larger in cross-section than any cross-section of said bulb, and a flange extending outwardly from said globe to interlock with said fixture and hold said globe out of engagement with said bulb, said parts being adapted to be brought out of interlocking relation upon the distortion of said globe.

13. In a device of the character described, in

combination, a lighting fixture, lugs extending from said lighting fixture, yieldable light-directing means for said lighting fixture, and a flange on said light-directing means to interlock with said lugs, said flange being movable out of engagement with at least one of said lugs upon distortion of said light-directing means.

14. In a device of the character described, in combination, a lighting fixture, spaced lugs on said lighting fixture and arranged in a circle, and light-directing means for said fixture made of a distortable material and having circular means distortable out of circular shape to permit interfitting with said lugs.

15. Ina device of the character described, in combination, a support adapted to have a source of light related thereto and having means providing a plurality of peripherally spaced Wedgeshaped' recesses, and a globe of yieldable material having a Wedge-shaped flange adapted to be seated into said Wedge-shaped recesses upon initial distortion of said globe and subsequent yielding thereof toward assumption of normal shape.

ARTHUR R. ELMENDORF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4104712 *Feb 1, 1977Aug 1, 1978Erich HafnerOutdoor light fixture
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/478, 362/343
International ClassificationF21V17/00, F21V17/16
Cooperative ClassificationF21V17/16, F21V17/00
European ClassificationF21V17/16, F21V17/00