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Publication numberUS1957039 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1934
Filing dateMar 20, 1933
Priority dateMar 20, 1933
Publication numberUS 1957039 A, US 1957039A, US-A-1957039, US1957039 A, US1957039A
InventorsBuenger Edward F, Wedge Fred D
Original AssigneeWilson Jones Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loose leaf binder
US 1957039 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 193% E. F. BUENGER ET AL, 1,957,039

LOOSE LEAF B INDER Filed March 20, 1955 mm Y. W W m E Mg m 5 A 6 D 7 WP am fi Fatented May 1, 1934 iQE LOOSE LEAF BINDER Edward F. Buenger,

022k Park, and Fred D.

Wedge, Lombard, llllL, assignors to Wilson-Jones Company, (Jhicago, Ill chusetts Application March 20,

11 Claims.

Ihis invention relates to a loose leaf binder having an easel structure adapted to support the binder at an angle so that the contents of the binder may be displayed to the best possible advantage.

It is an object of this invention to provide a loose leaf binder with an easel structure capable of supporting the binder at any desired angular position. It is a further object of this invention to provide an easel structure which may be readily opened and closed and which, when closed, w ll not detract from the appearance of the binder. It is a further object of this invention to provide an easel support for loose leaf binders which will be economical to manufacture and will be simple and efficient in operation. Other objects or" this invention will become apparent upon reading the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure l is a perspective view of the rear of a loose leaf binder embodying the invention;

Figure 2 is a view sirm'lar to Figure 1 showing a modified form of the invention;

Figure 3 is a rear elevation of the binder show- 1 'ing the easel in closed position;

Figure 4 is an end elevation showing the binder and easel in closed position; and

Figure 5 is a detail perspective of the free end of the easel member.

In the drawing the reference numeral 2 indicates a back member to which a conventional ring metal 3 is secured in any suitable manner. The ring metal includes a plurality of divided rings 4. which. are adapted to retain the contents of the lbinder. A pair of relatively short flanges 5, 6

extend along the longitudinal edges of the back member 2. A pair of covers 7, 8 are hingedly se cured to the outer edges of the flanges 5, 6.

The easel support consists of two metal plates "9, 10, the combined length of which equals the length of the back member 2. The member 9 is provided along its lon itudinal edges with a pair of flanges ll, 12 which project a short distance beyond one end of the member 9. A pair of flanges l3, 14 extending along the longitudinal edges of the member 10 are pivotally secured to the projecting portions of the flanges ll, 12, respectively, by means of rivets 15. The flanges 13, 1d are pivotally secured to the bottom ends of the flanges 5, 6, respectively by means of a pin 16. If desired, two pins, one for each connection, may be substituted for the single pin 16. The flanges ll, 12, 13, 14 are each equal in height to the flanges 5, 6. Accordingly, when the easel support is in closed position, the metal plate mema corporation of Massa- 1933, Serial No. 661,674

bers 9 and 10 will lie flush with the back of the binder. The easel support is preferably covered with fabric similar to that of the covers 7, 8 so that it will look like an integral part of the binding when the binder is closed.

The metal plate members 9 and 10 are substan tially the same width as the back member 2 so that the easel will fit snugly between the flanges 5, 6. Each flange 11, 12 may be flared outwardly to a slight respectively, at its free end to provide increased frictional contact between the easel and the binder. The flared portions 17, 18 are adapted to hold the easel in any desired position between the flanges 5, 6 and yet permit relative sliding movement between the easel and the binder back. A plurality of ratchet tooth projections 19 are provided on the back member 2 to co-operate with the free end of the plate 9 to provide positive stops for the easel support.

In the modified form of the invention illustrated in Figure 2, the flanges 20 on each side of the back member 2 are provided with grooves 21 in which the ends of a pin 22 are adapted to slide. The pin 22 is secured to the free ends of the flanges 23, 24 which are similar to the flanges l1, 12. In this modification it is obviously unnecessary to flare the ends of the flanges 23, 24 because the top end of the easel cannot be sepa rated from the flanges 20.

The operation of the easel support for the binder is extremely simple. When the easel is in closed position, the binder appears to be an ordinary loose leaf binder and may be used as such. When it is desired to support the binder at any angle, the top end of the metal plate member 9 is moved down towards fixed end of the metal plate member 10 until the desired angular position of the member 10 is attained. Then when the covers of the binder are opened, the binder is adapted to support itself on any suitable surface. When it is desired to close the easel structure, the top edge of the plate 9 must be moved outwardly a sufiicient distance to clear the projections 19 on the back member. The ported in opened position by the easel structure described possesses iuiusual stability because both ends of the easel are in contact with the back member and the entire surface area of the metal plate 10 is in contact with the surface on which the binder rests.

While we have described our invention in detail, it will be understood that the description thereof is illustrative rather than restrictive, as many details may be modified or changed withextent, as indicated at 17, 18, (Figure 5) c5 binder, when sup- 3 out departing from the spirit or scope of our invention. Accordingly, we do not desire to be restricted to the exact construction described except as limited by the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a loose leaf binder, a pair of cover members, a back member offset inwardly of the rear edges of said cover members, and an easel member fitting between said cover members.

2. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, a pair of cover members having their rear edges projecting beyond the edges of said back member, and an easel member connected to said back member and having its outer face substantially flush with the rear edges of said cover members.

3. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, a pair of flanges extending along the longitudinal edges of said back member, and an easel member secured to said flanges and terminating in the plane of the outer edges of said flanges.

4. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, a plurality of projections on said back member, and an easel member having one end fixed adjacent one end of said back and having its other end adapted to cooperate with said projections to support the binder in several positions.

5. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, an easel member fitting snugly against said back member and fixed thereto at one end, said easel having its other end slidable in contact with said back member, and means on said back member forming a positive stop for said slidable end of said easel member.

6. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, a pair of flanges extending at an angle from the longitudinal edges of said back member, and an easel member provided with flanges on its longitudinal edges secured to said first mentioned flanges, the

flanges of said easel member being flared outwardly adjacent one end thereof to increase the frictional contact between said easel member and said first mentioned flanges.

'7. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, and an easel member having one end pivotally secured to said back member and its other end slidably secured to said back section.

8. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, a pair of flanges extending along the longitudinal edges of said back member, and an easel member hav ing one end pivotally secured to said flanges and its other end slidable between said flanges.

9. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, a pair of flanges extending along the longitudinal edges of said back member, an easel member having one end secured to said flanges, the other end of said easel member being slidable in contact with said back member, and means on said back member for holding said easel member from accidental sliding movement.

10. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, a pair of flanges extending along the longitudinal edges of said back member. and an easel member secured at one end to said flanges, said easel memser comprising two sections pivotally connected at their adjoining edges, the free end of said easel member being slidable between said flanges.

11. In a loose leaf binder, a back member, a pair of flanges extending along the longitudinal edges of said back member, and an easel member secured at one end to said flange said easel member comprising two sections pivotally connected at their adjoining edges, the outer surface of said sections lying flush with the outer edges of said flanges when said easel member is closed.

EDWARD F. BUENGER. FRED D. WEDGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2490356 *Mar 14, 1945Dec 6, 1949Hummel Robert StuartCollapsible bookrest
US2881008 *Aug 15, 1957Apr 7, 1959Sanford L GoldmanCombination binder and easel
US3121576 *Oct 12, 1959Feb 18, 1964Nat Blank Book CoBinder case construction convertible to easel form
US4315642 *Aug 6, 1979Feb 16, 1982Errichiello DIntegrally molded covers and spines for looseleaf books
US4315696 *Apr 18, 1980Feb 16, 1982Wright Line Inc.Easel-style suspension binder
US4679757 *May 16, 1986Jul 14, 1987Mussari Fred PAdjustable bookholder
US4770385 *Oct 6, 1986Sep 13, 1988Glenn A. Bahm, Inc.Self-locking triad support
US5248030 *Dec 10, 1992Sep 28, 1993Binney & Smith Inc.Folding instrument container
US6131952 *Feb 14, 2000Oct 17, 2000Blau; DanCloth book with rigid support
US6536803 *Aug 8, 2001Mar 25, 2003Sofos Partnership LimitedFolder
US8038116 *Nov 23, 2009Oct 18, 2011Lee EunyoungPortable and collapsible bookstand
US8651529 *Apr 28, 2011Feb 18, 2014Eran YAIRIntegrable bookstand
US20110050063 *Jun 23, 2010Mar 3, 2011Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd.Adjustable table stand and device using the same
US20120274058 *Apr 28, 2011Nov 1, 2012Yair EranIntegrable bookstand
DE102007033687A1 *Jul 19, 2007Jan 29, 2009Alexander BayerBook e.g. school book, has book back with foldable back part pivotable between folding-in position and folding-out position such that back part in folded-out position forms raising device for book
DE102007033687B4 *Jul 19, 2007Mar 4, 2010Alexander BayerBuch mit einer Aufstellvorrichtung
WO1981000348A1 *Aug 6, 1980Feb 19, 1981Errichiello DIntegrally molded covers and spines for looseleaf books
Classifications
U.S. Classification281/33
International ClassificationB42F13/00, B42F13/40
Cooperative ClassificationB42F13/402
European ClassificationB42F13/40B