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Publication numberUS1958560 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1934
Filing dateOct 7, 1929
Priority dateOct 7, 1929
Publication numberUS 1958560 A, US 1958560A, US-A-1958560, US1958560 A, US1958560A
InventorsBeckman Herman E
Original AssigneePatent & Licensing Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prepared roofing
US 1958560 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 15, 1934'. H. E. BECKMAN I 1 5 0 PREPARED ROOFING Filed Oct. 7, 1929 Patented May 15, 1934 PREPARED ROOFING Herman E. Beckman, Naperville, 111., assignor, by mesne assignments, to The Patent and Licensing Corporation, Boston, Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts Application October 7, 1929, Serial No. 397,764 2 Claims. (01. 108-7) This invention relates to roofing, and more particularly to prepared roofing or roofing made from composition material.

The principal object of the invention is thepreparation of roofing material in strip form in such a novel manner and attaching the same to the roof in such a way that when in position on a roof it will simulate the appearance of a roof made from individual shingles.

Another object of the invention is the severing of roofing strips of conventional width along a more or less irregular line whereby when the strips are applied to a roof they will have certain portions overlapping farther than others,thereby enabling the strip tobe more firmly secured in position against the action of the wind which tends to enter between the overlapping portions.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a novel roof of prepared material that will simulate the shingles of a thatched roof and that may be produced and applied with a minimum of time and expense.

Another object of the invention is the provision of new and improved roofing material that is inexpensive to manufacture, may be. easily and thereon;

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the web severed into two strips; and

Fig. 3 is a plan view of a portion of a roof showng the invention in position thereon, with parts in section and parts broken away.

In the covering of buildings by strips or rolls of roofing material it is desirable that when laid the roof shall simulate the appearance of a roof that has been covered with individual shingles.

The present invention seeks to accomplish this effect by a comb nation of cutting the strip .in a novel manner and painting or printing lines thereon, to represent one course or row of shingles, and by painting or printing on said strip- 0 lines to represent an overlapping or next succeeding row or course of shingles.

It has been found by experiment that the most realistic effect may be produced by simulating the appearance of what is known in the trade as a thatched roof, that is one in which the butts of a course of shingles on a thatched roof. 'Other lines 13 and 14, preferably lighter than the lines '11 and 12, strip to extend transversely of the strip to repare painted or printed on the resent the side edges of the shingles 15 forming the row or course 16 along one edge of the strip,

and the shingles 17 forming the row or course 18 along the opposite edge.

The strip is severed along an irregular line as indicated in Fig. 2,

which shows the strip 10 severedlongitudinally and with the severed strips slightly separated.

The severed line extends along the central portion of the strip longitudinally thereof along an irregular, angular, or zigzag line so arranged as to represent the butt or lower ends of the conventional rectangular shingles of different widths.

In other words, the severed line or the line along which the strip is divided comprises portions 19 extending longitudinally of the strip and portions 21 extending transversely thereto.

The portions 19 ends of shingles 22 and 23 of .the rows or courses.

represent the lower or butt 24 and 25; respectively. These lines are of different lengths to indicate shingles of difierent widths.

The transverse lines 21 are extended as at 26 and 27 to designate the. side edges of the shingles 22 and 23 of the rows 24 and 25, respectively.

For convenience tending longitudinally of the web or strip may' of description the lines exbe considered as extending horizontally and those transversely thereto as extending upwardly, since this is the direction they will extend when applied to a roof. The lines defining the side edges of the shingles of one course 01' TOW are oifset from those of the next preceding, and also from those of the next succeeding row, whereby the shingles will appear to properly overlap the joints in the same manner as wooden or individual shingles are laid.

courses of shingles.

In applying the strips A and B to a roof 20, see Fig. 3, one of the strips as A is secured in position and the other strip B is turned end for end and placed in overlapping position on the upper edge of the strip A as clearly disclosed in said figure. Inasmuch as every alternate row has an exposed lower edge, the whole roof will have the appearance ofa shingled roof. This illusion is heightened by the thatched appearance of the roof.

In order to produce a similarity in the appearance of the lower edges of the severed portions to the painted or stamped portions, the severed portions may be painted or printed with a heavy line 29 either before or after it has been severed. Preferably the line 29 will be across the lower ends of the portions representing the shingles as indicated in Figs. 1 and 2 and the connecting portions will be in lighter lines to represent the side edges of the shingles.

If the line 29 is applied before the web or strip is severed the line is made twice the width of the line 11 or the line 12 so that when the strip is severed the line will be divided so that each portion of the web will have a line along its severed portion substantially the same width as the line 11 or the line 12.

In laying out the spaces to represent shingles, the web is preferably laid out in what may be termed units of uniform widths as indicated by the braces C and D in Figs. 2 and 3. Each unit preferably comprises a definite number of shingles of predetermined widths. In the form shown, each unit comprises the four spaces simulating four shingles. These units are of the same width and the corresponding shingles of each unit are preferably of the same width whereby they may be readily laid to break joints, that is, the shingles of one row may be readily laid so that the side lines thereof will be offset relative to those of the next adjacent row. This is considered an important feature of the invention because it enables the workman to properly lay the roof with a minimum of time and labor and with a small loss of material in properly matching the design.

While I have shown the lower or butt ends of the shingles as being rectangular, it is understood that they may be of other shapes or forms, those illustrated being by way of example only.

In the use of strip shingles or'strip material, it is the common practice to overlap the strips a uniform amount, usually about one and one half to two inches. These overlapping edges are then usually cemented together and fastening means passed therethrough into the roof 20 for securing the strips or webs in position. With the web out to represent the shingles of a thatched roof the shorter portions being overlapped the conventional amount, the longer portions or shingles will overlap to a considerable extent and will therefore more firmly hold the material in overlapped position and prevent wind from entering beneath the same.

It is thought from the foregoing'taken in connection with the accompanying drawing that the construction and operation of my device will be apparent to those skilled in the art, and that various changes in size, shape, proportion and details of construction may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A roofing strip having its lower edge out along an irregular line defining the butt edges of a course of shingles of different widths, said butt edges being relatively displaced longitudinally of the shingles, transverse lines on said strip for representing the side edges of said shingles, a heavy irregular line between the upper and lower edges of said strip and other lines extending transversely of the strip for simulating another course of shingles of different width with butt edges relatively displaced longitudinally of the shingles of the second named course, the shingle areas of each of said courses being arranged in groups of uniform width, each group comprising a definite number of shingles of predetermined varying width.

2. A roofing strip having its lower edge out along an irregular line defining the butt edges of a course of shingles of different widths, said butt edges being relatively displaced longitudinally of the shingles, transverse lines on said strip for representing the side edges of said shingles, a heavy irregular line between the upper and lower edges of said strip and other lines extending transversely of the strip for simulating another course of shingles of different width with butt edges relatively displaced longitudinally of the shingles of the second named course, the said lower cut edge of said strip being outlined with a' dark colored border line, the shingle areas of each of said courses being arranged in groups of uniform width, each group comprising a definite number of shingles of predetermined varying Width.

HERMAN E. BECKMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3407556 *Jul 26, 1966Oct 29, 1968Philip Carey CorpLeak resistant roof covering and multitab shingle therefor
US4050209 *May 17, 1976Sep 27, 1977Shakertown CorporationPrefabricated shingle panels
US4102107 *Sep 9, 1974Jul 25, 1978Shakertown CorporationPrefabricated shingle panels
US5375387 *Jan 7, 1992Dec 27, 1994Davenport; Ralph G.Roofing shingle providing simulated slate roof covering
US5426902 *Jun 10, 1991Jun 27, 1995Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5660014 *Feb 10, 1995Aug 26, 1997Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5860263 *Feb 2, 1996Jan 19, 1999Building Materials Corporation Of AmericaThickened reinforced roofing shingle
US5901517 *May 9, 1997May 11, 1999Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6195951Nov 17, 1998Mar 6, 2001Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6305138Oct 18, 2000Oct 23, 2001Certainteed Corp.Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6523316Oct 23, 2001Feb 25, 2003CertainteedComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/557, D25/56
International ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26