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Publication numberUS1959510 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1934
Filing dateNov 30, 1932
Priority dateDec 2, 1931
Publication numberUS 1959510 A, US 1959510A, US-A-1959510, US1959510 A, US1959510A
InventorsWaveren Theodorus Van
Original AssigneeWaveren Theodorus Van
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package for flower bulbs
US 1959510 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 22, 1934. T. VAN wAvEREN I 1,959,510

PACKAGE F013 FLOWER BULBS Fleld NOV. CSQ',l 193.2 3 Sheets-Shet l May 22, 1934. T. VAN WAVEREN 1,959,510

lPACKAGE FOR FLOWER BULBS4 l Filed-Nov. 30,' 1932. Y -5 sheetssheet 2 n l /7e'odo--rusvyan lll/@Tueren 'Patented May 22, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application November 30, 1932, Serial No. 645,101 In the Netherlands December 2, 1931 It is desirable for bulbs to be well protected in transportation, otherwise they maybe injured and the different varieties may be huddled together. In order that the bulbs may yield good flowers, it is also necessary for them to be planted, watered and cared for in a somewhat skilled manner.

It has already been proposed to ship bulbs in a pot containing a certain amount of potting compound and retained in a package against possible movement. This package protects the potted bulb during transportation and may, after being partly removed, be used as a jardinire therefor during the growth and the flowering of the bulb.

The object of this invention is a package for bulbs which, when used as a pot, increases the buyers chance to have the bulbs yield the nest possible flowers. With this object in view, the

package itself is partly or wholly arranged to form a pot for the bulbs. The same is composed substantially of two sections adaptedto be collapsed or nested one within the other so as to form a suitable package occupying a minimum of space, but also to be assembled or erected so as to form a suitable pot of increased size. The bulbs are preferably embedded in a certain amount of dry potting compound.

In transportation, the package should economize space to reduce freight and carriage. On

the other hand, the addition of water to the potting compound for forcing the bulb into bloom causes the compound to swell, and when water culture is to be applied, it is necessary to place a water receptacle underneath the bulbs. These are the reasons why the package according to the invention is formed in two sections adapted to be assembled in various relative locations to form receptacles of different sizes.

Preferably, one of said sections constitutes a waterproof container, whereas the other section may be in the form of a collar or ring adapted either to be collapsed or nested within, or to be placed on the said container.

As far as aeration and watering of the roots are concerned, my novel package, used as a pot, will have marked advantages if the top edge of the container is wider than the collar or ring and projects, in upward direction, beyond the bottom edge thereof. Y

Seeing that my novel package mainly consists of an open container and an open collar or ring adapted to be nested therein, or placed thereon, it is desirable to also use a cover plate of compressed peat or other material adapted as (Cl. 20G-46) a suitable potting compound. If necessary, said cover plate may be reinforced by wire gauze.v Alternatively, the bulbs may be held between perforated disks, boards or like members, of which the one, which engages the root sides of the bulbs, '60 is preferably made of material adapted as a potting compound and, if necessary, reinforced.

Access of air to the roots of the bulbs in essential for the growth and the flowering. With a view thereto, the aforesaid Waterproof container is preferably weakened locally, so that the buyer may make the required aerating holes in the pot without having to use special tools. Said aerating holes should be prevented from becoming choked or closed by inadvertency and it is therefore proposed to provide the package with an inverted dish-shaped cover having raised portions, so that the dish and the container placed thereon cannot contact with one another through an extended surface.

The drawings illustrate some embodiments of my invention.

Figs. 1, 2 and 3 are a longitudinal sectional elevation, a cross sectional elevation, and a plan view, respectively, of a unit containing a plurality of bulbs and potting compound.

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal sectional elevation of the same unit, with its sections moved to a new relative location, the potting compound having been watered and thereby swollen, and the bulbs being placed on the compound to take root.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view on an enlarged scale and illustrates how the collar is nested in the container when the unit is used as a package.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary vertical sectional elevation on an enlarged scale and illustrates how the collar ts on the container when the unit is used as a pot.

Fig. '7 is a fragmentary vertical sectional ele- 95 vation of a second embodiment, wherein the sections are assembled to form a package, and wherein no potting compound is used.

Fig. 8 is a similar elevation with the sections assembled to form a pot. i

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary plan view of the package shown in Fig. 7, with the cover removed.

Fig. 10 illustrates, in a vertical sectional elevation, a third embodiment with the sections assembled to form a package.

Fig. 11 is a vertical sectional elevation of the embodiment shown in Fig. 10, wherein the'sections are assembled to form a pot.

As shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, a certain number of bulbs 1 are embedded in potting compound 2, 110

for instance, dry peat dust, moss litter, or other suitable material, to which lime, powdered charcoal and artificial manure may be added. The potting compound retains the blubs against movement within the package and prevents any injury thereto, at the same time protecting them against fungoid growth and insects. When watered, said compound forms' an excellent growing bed. The bulbs and the potting compound are placed in a receptacle composed of a container 3 of waterproof material, a rectangular open ring or collar 4 of the same material, and a cover plate 5 of compressed peat engaged and retained by an inwardly bent ange 6 of collar 4.

The collar 4 is provided with four outwardly extending projections 7.

The unit shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 5-may be wrapped in paper, or held together by means of a piece of string and is then ready for shipping. Without the cover plate 5 'and the collar 4, the unit could not well be transported.

When the buyer willhave the bulbs grow and ilower, he places the unit with the plate 5 down.

Thereafter, the container 3 is slid vertically off the collar 4, the dry bulbs are taken out of the potting compound, and the collar is placed with its projections 7 upon the top edge of the container (Fig. 4), after sufficient water has been.

poured into the latter to wet the bottom face of the plate 5. Said platel immediately absorbs water, whereby it crumbles down and falls into the water, together with the loose peat dust 2. After the peat dust has swollen and the mass been stirred until it almost4 completely fllls up the space within the container and the collar, the bulbs are placed with their root sides upon the surface of the moist mass, which now forms an excellent growing bed.

The inwardly turned top edge portion of the container 3 is provided, near its four corners, with resilient tongues 8 cut from the material. The collar 4 has mating projections 9, or an outwardly extending bead. When the collar is placed on the top edge of the container (Fig. 6), the projections 9 first push the tongues 8 away, but as soon as they have moved past, said tongues again move back-by resiliency so as to lock the collar against upward movement relative: to the container.

The compressed peat plate 5 may be provided with holes or grooves, so as to more readily crumble down when absorbing water.

In the position shown in Fig. 6, there is a certain amount of clearance between the collar 4 and the top edge of the container 3, so that atmospheric air has free access to the roots.

As stated above, it is desirable to also provide for aerating holes in the bottom of the container 3 after the potting compound has absorbed water. A suitable construction for attaining this purpose is shown in Figs. 7-9.

In accordance with last said figures, the package consistsof a'circular, waterproof container 10 having an outwardly ared top edge 11 provided with three or four equally spaced, inwardly extending lips 12. Placed inside said container is the'loose collar 13 provided with suitably bent metal strips 14, each having an outwardly bent portion adapted to engage the bottoxnface of the corresponding lip 12. The strips 14 also serve to lock a thin, apertured board or disk 15. A similar board or disk 16 is located in the lower portion of the tapering collar 13. Said boards or disks brace the bulbs 17 so that these are kept in the proper relative positions. The apertures in the upper board 15 are larger than those in the lower board 16. The relatively large apertures serve for the passage of the roots which the bulbs later will put out, whereas the relatively small holes serve for the sprouted ends of the bulbs to project therethrough. The board 16 is spaced from the bottom of the container 10 so that the sprouted ends of the bulbs cannot come into contact with the bottom-of container 10.

'I'he container 10 with the collar 13 nested therein is covered by a cover 18, which later can be used as a dish for the container (Fig. 8).

Fig. 8 illustrates how the package shown in Fig. 7 can be used as pot for forcing the bulbs to bloom, As shown, the collar 13 has been placed topside down on inwardly extending projections 19 of the container 10. The locking strips 14, in cooperation with the lips 12, again prevent the collar from upward movement relative to the container. 'I'he bulbs have been placed, with their root ends down, on the board l5 and the sprouted ends of the bulbs are braced by the apertured board 16, so that the bulbs cannot tilt orvcant when producing their rela-tively heavy flowers. During the growth of the bulbs it is advisable now and then to disengage the collar 13 and lift it a little to ascertain whether there is still a sufcient amount of water in the container 10. The flared top edge portion 11 allows of water being poured into said container without the bulbs themselves being wetted.

The board or disk 15 is provided with equally spaced circumferential recesses 25 (Fig. 9) in order that it may be pushed past the inwardly bent flanges of the metal strips 14, with which it forms a bayonet joint.

If the bulbs in a package shown in Figs. 7-9 require a growing bed of potting compound, a compressed peat plate may be placed and clamped in between the locking strips 14, and the lower side of the collar 13 may be closed by a sheet of paper 20 (Fig. 7) secured thereto by a piece of string 21. The space intermediate between said compressed plate and the paper sheet 20 then serves for packing the bulbs, around which the potting compound is placed. In this case, the boards 15 and 16 are dispensed with, and after the cover 18 has been removed, the collar 13 with its contents may be taken out of the container 10 without the potting compound spilling, since this loose material is held between the said plate' of compressed peat and the paper sheet 20.

When using such a growing bed, it is essential that air be permitted access to the compound, and with a view thereto, the bottom of the container 10 is provided with some holes covered by thin metal discs 22 soldered along their edges. After the compressed peat plate has crumbled down and the mixture of water and peat has been thoroughly stirred,'the discs 22 are torn off, or simply perforated. Outwardly extending projections 23 of the bottom of the container 10, and inwardly extending projections of the dish-like cover 18 (which projections, on the other side, form recesses) insure that there will be sufficient room between both (Fig. 8), so that the aerating holes always remain open.

The projections 23, which form the legs of the container 10, may be made to t the recesses 24, so that a number of packages in accordance with Fig. 7 may be stacked up to form a steady pile adapted to be packed in a wooden box or the like.

The board 15 may be replaced by wire gauze with large meshes. In order to prevent potting compound from falling through these meshes, a sheet of filtering paper may be provided on the lower face of the gauze. When moistened, said ltering paper can easily be perforated by the roots.

The container and the collar may also be made of strong, impregnated paper, moulded fibrous material, or any other substance which is sumciently waterproof and suitable for packingpurposes.

If desired, the cover and the container, before being shipped, may be interconnected by locking members, lips,..f'string, or in any other suitable manner, but .these means do not form part of this invention.

As the plate of compressed peat is adapted to absorb much water and thereby to swell to a considerable extent, it furnishes a large volume of potting compound. Consequently the loose compound around the bulbs need only be used in a quantity just sufficient to prevent the packed bulbs from engaging each other and the walls of the package. Instead of loose peat dust or moss litter, pieces of agglomerated peat may be used.

The compressed peat plate occupies a space which, otherwise, would have to be partly occupied by an apertured board, so that application of the invention does not unduly increase the size of the package relative to the volume of the bulbs packed therein, and the freight charges are not increased. Moreover, compressed peat plates, moss litter or the like have a very low specific gravity, so that also the weight of each parcel will be low.

It is well known that in the first period of their growth fiower bulbs should be kept in the dark. It is therefore ordinary practice for the buyer of potted bulbs to place the same in a cellar, or in a cupboard. As a suitable dark space may not always be available for the purpose under consideration, the package itself may be provided with means for preventing access of light to the bulbs, so that the latter may b e put away anywhere, also during the first period of their growth. With a view thereto, the package shown in Fig. 10, which is composed of substantially the same parts as the one illustrated in Fig. 7 (viz. a container 10 having an outwardly flared top edge portion with some inwardly extending lips 12 riveted thereto, a collar 13 nested inside this container and locked therein by means of metal strips 14 with outwardly bent anges for engaging the bottom faces of the lips 12, and apertured boards or disks 15, 16 for holding the bulbs 17 in position), comprises a paper bag 26 which fully encloses the collar 13 with its contents.

Said bag is folded, as shown and prevents any potting compound from coming out of the package. If the bulbs are to be forced to bloom, the collar 13 and the bulbs are taken out of the bag, but the potting compound is still left therein, until the collar has been placed on the container. Thereupon the dry compound is poured around the bulbs and/or into the container 10. The bag thus serves to prevent the compound from spilling. Finally, the bag is unfolded to form a cap or bell 26' (Fig. 11) and placed over the bulbs.

Preferably, the bag 26 is made of strong black paper pasted with waterproof glue. It may conveniently have a size such that it is lifted by the leaves of the plants when these have attained a height corresponding to the moment at which the plants need no longer remain in the dark. The bag may also be made of paper lined with fabric, or of thin rubber, or. of any other suitable material.

What I claim is:-

1. A package for flower bulbs which may serve also as a growing pot, comprising 'one part in the shape of a vessel, a second part in the shape of a ring, one of such parts fitting freely within the other, thereby causing the height of thepacket to be at a minimum, said ring shaped part having at one end a smaller cross section than the mouth of said vessel shaped part so that said ring shaped part may be placed and supported at the top of said vessel shaped part, thereby causing the height of said assembled parts to be greater than the height when said parts are fitted together with one part inside the other.

2. A package for flower bulbs which can also serve as a growing pot, comprising a vessel shaped part, a ring shaped part, capable of fitting freely within said first mentioned part, said ring shaped part at one end having a smaller cross section than the mouth of the vessel shaped part so that said ring shaped part may be supported upon the top of said vessel shaped part and the cover plate of compressed potting compound covering said ring shaped and vessel shaped parts.

3. A package for flower' bulbs which can also serve as a growing pot, comprising a vessel shaped part, a ring shaped part, capable of fitting freely within said first mentioned part, said ring shaped part at one end having a smaller cross section than the mouth of the vessel shaped part so that said ring shaped part may be supported upon the top of said vessel shaped part, cover plate of compressed potting compound covering said ring shaped and vessel shaped parts and said cover plate being reinforced.

4. A package for flower bulbs which can also serve as a growing pot, comprising a vessel shaped part, a ring shaped part, said parts being so shaped as to telescope one within the other, said ring shaped part having at one end a smaller cross section than the mouth of said vessel shaped part so that one of said parts may be placed upon and supported by the other, and apertured sheet members positioned within said ring shaped part in spaced relation so as to form a receptacle for bulbs.

5. A package for ower bulbs which can also serve as a growing pot, comprising a vessel shaped part, a ring shaped part, said parts being so shaped as to telescope one within the other, said ring shaped part having at one end a smaller cross section than the mouth of said vessel shaped part so that one of said parts may be placed upon and supported by the other, apertured sheet members positioned within said ring shaped part in spaced relation so as to form a receptacle for bulbs, and one of said apertured sheet members being made of compressed potting compound.

6. A package for flower bulbs which can also serve as a growing pot, comprising a vessel shaped part, a ring shaped part, said parts being so constructed as totelescope within one another, said ring shaped part having at one end a smaller cross section than the mouth of the vessel shaped part so that it can be supported by the top of said vessel shaped part and said vessel shaped part having at the bottom thereof weak portions so as to facilitate the making of holes therein.

7. A package for flower bulbs which can also serve as a growing pot, comprising a vessel shaped part, a ring shaped part, said parts being so constructed as to telescope within one another, said ring shaped part having at one end a smaller cross section than the mouth of said vessel shaped part whereby said ring shaped Apart may be supported upon said vessel shaped part,l a cover for said parts and said cover being dish shaped and provided with inwardly extended projections.

8. A package for ower bulbs which can also serve as a growing pot, comprising a vessel shaped part, a ring shaped part, said parts being so constructed as to telescope within one another, said Aring shaped part having at one end a. smaller cross section than the mouth of said vessel shaped part whereby said ring shaped part may be supported upon said vessel shaped part, a

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2720725 *Sep 5, 1952Oct 18, 1955Peerless Sidney AMiniature greenhouse
US2930162 *Sep 30, 1957Mar 29, 1960Mulford Brothers CompanyShipping and growing device for bulbs
US3142936 *Dec 14, 1962Aug 4, 1964James H Matthews & CompanyFlower vase with flower stempositioning device
US3146548 *Oct 4, 1961Sep 1, 1964Waveren Marius VanMethod for treating windflower bulbs, for their preservation, transportation and subsequent plantings with a view to furthering the development of the flowers
US3678620 *Jun 23, 1970Jul 25, 1972Voges Albert JohnPackage
US3704545 *Apr 21, 1970Dec 5, 1972George Van ZonneveldPlastic container for bulbous plants
US3924354 *Jul 30, 1974Dec 9, 1975Gregoire Flowers IncShipping and display carton for cut flowers
US4124953 *Dec 2, 1976Nov 14, 1978Patton Harold YPlanter kit and display package therefor
US4736543 *Mar 18, 1985Apr 12, 1988Von Bertrab Erdmann GuillermoHorticultural tree
US6553714 *Feb 1, 2001Apr 29, 2003Ronald VahrmeyerContainer for a bulb
US6694671 *Nov 27, 2001Feb 24, 2004Ronald VahrmeyerContainer with fastener
US7448162 *Feb 24, 2006Nov 11, 2008Paternostre LilianSystem and method for displaying and marketing indoor flower bulbs
WO2007144117A1 *Jun 8, 2007Dec 21, 2007Sgaravatti Tessile S R LModular container for bedder germination and/or storage
Classifications
U.S. Classification47/84, 47/41.1, 71/64.13
International ClassificationB65D85/30, B65D85/52
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/52, B65D85/305
European ClassificationB65D85/30C, B65D85/52