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Publication numberUS1961317 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1934
Filing dateFeb 6, 1934
Priority dateFeb 6, 1934
Publication numberUS 1961317 A, US 1961317A, US-A-1961317, US1961317 A, US1961317A
InventorsEvans Arthur H, Werme Melcher G
Original AssigneeCharles L Feldman, Edward C Bower
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Balanced spiral fabric
US 1961317 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1934. M. WERME ET AL BALANCED SPIRAL FABRIC Filed Feb. 6, 1934 mveurons: filth-Ivar lz'. Mama and flr/fiar E 21491 8 THEIR ATTORNEYS Patented June 5, 1934 1,961,317 BALANCED SPIRAL FABRIC Melcher G. Werme and Arthur H. Evans, Worcester, Mass, assignors to Edward C. Bower and Charles L. Fldman, receivers for Wickwire Spencer Steel Company, New York,

poration of Delaware N. Y., a cor- Application February 6, 1934, Serial No. 709,928

6 Claims. (o1.245--1o) The present invention relates to fabrics and embodies, more specifically, an improved wire fabric designed particularly for use as a conveyor belt or the like. The invention is especially concerned with conveyor belts formed of a plurality of transverse coils of wire which are secured together through the instrumentality of binge connectors.

Gonveyor belts have heretofore been designed and formed of transverse coils of wire, alternate coils being of one direction of spiral upon one side.

' of the belt andintermediate'coils extending in the opposite direction upon the same side of the belt in order that transverse .creepage ofthe belt during operation may be prevented. These existing forms of belts are illustrated in the copending application of Vernon C. King, Serial No. 660,121, filed March 9, 1933, for Balanced spiral fabric, and the transverse connectors have been welded to the adjacent coil sections andconstitute what is known as a balanced spiral fabric.

In accordance withthe present invention, it is proposed toprovide a balanced spiral fabric having the advantages of o the existing spiral fabrics above alluded to and, in addition, further advantages including the provision of a structure which will not require heat treatment after uniting the connectors and. spiral members, as by welding.

A further object of the invention is to provide a fabric of the above character composedpf parts which arearticulated in such fashion as to provide a loose connection between adjacent elements so that the chairras it hangs freely and festoons, is entirely flexible thus permitting the fabric or chain to bend in two planesinstead of only one plane.

A further object of the invention is to provide a fabric of the above character wherein the elements are assembled in such fashion as to avoid disturbing the physical characteristics thereof, as frequently results when the material iswelded.

7 A further object of the invention is to provide a fabric of the above character wherein the ends of the spiral elements are connected to the con", nectors in such fashion as to improve the result-,

Of the structed outer cars 21.

Further objects, not specifically enumerated above, will be apparent as the invention is described in greater detail in connectionwith the accompanying drawing, wherein: v

Figure l is a plan view of a portion of a balanced spiral fabric provided with a chain edge and conin accordance with the present inven-' tion. 7

Figure 2 is a view in section, taken on line 2- -2 of Figure 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows. A

Figure 3 is a view in end elevation, partly broken away and in section showing the construction of the chain edge and the manner ofsecuring the crimped connectors thereto.

of Figure 3, and looking in the direction of the Figure 4 is a view in section, taken on line 44 F arrows.

With reference to Figure l, the spiral fabric is shown as being formed of alternate right and left hand spiral elements 10 and 11, respectively.

These elements are hingedly connected by-means of crimped wire connections 12 which extend transversely of the belt and are formed with straight extensions. 13 at the endsthereof. The spiral elements 10 and 11 are hinged within the adjacent crimped portions of the connectors 12 and knuckles 14 are formed upon the ends ofare formed. The straight ends 13 extend between the sides 16 and 1'7 of the links and are adapted to receive washers 19, these washers being properly positioned by means of inner cars 20- and The washers 19 are formed with cars 22 to facilitate the securing of the washers within the apertures 18, as clearly shown in Figure 3.

In manufacturing and assembling the elements, the spiral members 10 and 11 are formed with knees I l-as above described and are hingedly con nected by inserting the crimped wire connectors therethrough. The crimpedwire connectors are previously provided with washers 19, spaced by the four cars 20 and 21 at one end thereof and, at the other ends thereof, the connectors are formed with the inner ears 20. The connectors thus formed are slipped through the properly pothat these washers may be properly positioned.-

The fabric so formed is then ready to have the chains attached thereto, the first step in such operation being the opening of the links of the chain by means of a suitable tool. After the links have been opened, they are slipped over the washers on the straight ends 13 of the connectors in order that the washers may be received within the openings 18. The links of the chain are then closed, positioning the elements. as shownin Figures 3 and 4. I

It will thus be seen that the spiral fabric may be easily repaired by opening the links of the chain 15 and removing the desired connectors in drder that they maybe replaced. This operation does not injure adjacent elements of the fabric;

ric to hang in perfect festoons.

The structure of the present invention is characterized by complete flexibility, causing the fab- No opportunity arises for the elements to become entangled and the'connection of the various elements of the fabric in-the manner shown and described herein prevents injury to the material of the fabric, such as frequently encountered where the elements are welded together.

Moreover, the elements of the fabric accommodate bending or relative movement therebetween in two planes instead of only one plane as characteristic of present spiral fabrics.

A further advantage of the present structure lies in the formation of a continuous chain edge which will not fray, thus imparting uniform and great tensile strength to the belt and avoidingthe necessity of heat treating the elements thereof.

A belt constructed in accordance with the present invention may be formed of galvanized wire inasmuch as the structure does not destroy the zinc coating of the wire-because no welding or other deleterious operations are performed upon .chains at the ends of the elements, washers on the ends of the connectors and secured to the chains, and ears pressed out of the connectors to position the washers.

2. A wire fabric formed of spiral elements, 8 transverse connectors between the elements, chains at th ends of the elements, washers on the ends of the connectors and secured in the chains, said washers having ears-formed thereon to engage the links of the chains, and means to position the washers on the connectors.

, 3. A wire fabric formed of spiral elements having knuckles formed at the ends thereof, trans verse crimped wire connectors extending through the elements and knuckles, chains at the ends of the elements, washers on the ends of the connectors engaging thelinks of the. chains, and

means to position the washers on the connectors.

4. A wire fabric formed of spiral elements .having knuckles formed at the ends thereof, transverse crimped wire connectors extending through the elements and knuckles, the connectors having straight ends, chains at the ends of the elements, wasl'frs on the straight ends of the connectors, said washers being received in the links of the chains, and means to position the washers on the straight ends of the connectors.

5. A wire fabric formedoof spiral elements, transverse connectors with which said spiral ele.

ments are pivotally engaged, chains disposed along the edges of the fabric and comprising a plurality of links pivotally engaged, respectively, the transverse pivotal axes of the links, respectively, being offset with respect to said con- I nectors, respectively, and means to secure said 1'10 connectors pivotally to said links, respectively.

6. A wire fabric formed of.-spiralelements, transverse crimped connectors with which said spiral elements are pivotally engaged, straight portions formed at the ends'of said connectors and extending beyond the edges of said fabric, chains disposed along the edges of the fabric and comprising a plurality of links pivotally engaged, respectively, the transverse pivotal axes of the links, respectively, lying between said straight ends of the connectors, respectively, and means to secure said straight endsof the connectors pivotally to said links, respectively.

MELCHER G. WERME. ARTHUR. H. EVANS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3376002 *Mar 5, 1965Apr 2, 1968Cambridge Wire ClothConnecting bar
US5423416 *Sep 3, 1993Jun 13, 1995Ashworth Brothers, Inc.Conveyor belts with spiral overlay
US5558208 *May 4, 1995Sep 24, 1996Ashworth Brothers, Inc.Conveyor belts with spiral overlay
Classifications
U.S. Classification245/10, 245/6
International ClassificationB65G15/54, B65G17/06, B65G15/30, B65G17/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65G2812/02386, B65G2201/06, B65G17/08, B65G15/54
European ClassificationB65G17/08, B65G15/54