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Publication numberUS1961730 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1934
Filing dateApr 27, 1928
Priority dateApr 27, 1928
Publication numberUS 1961730 A, US 1961730A, US-A-1961730, US1961730 A, US1961730A
InventorsDickerson G Baker
Original AssigneeAmerican Thread Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wound bobbin and method of producing the same
US 1961730 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1934. G, BAKER 1,961,730

WOUND BOBBIN AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Filed April 27, 1928 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 LV INVENTOR 0. G. BAKER ATTORNEYS June 5, 1934. D G. K R 1,961,730

WOUND BOBBIN AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Filed April 27, 1928 3 SheetsSheet 2 7 f 5 INVENTOR 25 5 7 WXTTORNEYS D. G. BAKER 1,961,730

WOUND BOBBIN AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME June 5, 1934.

3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed April 27, 1928 INVENTOR 0 G. BAKER ATTORNEYS Patented June 5, 1934 woman nonnnw AND METHOD or PRODUCING THE SAME Dickerson G. Baker, Holyoke, Mass, assignor to The American Thread Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application April 27, 1928, Serial-No. 273,197 9 Claims. (01. 112-251) tion retains substantially the form given to it by My invention relates to cops and the method of producing the same and has for its objectto provide a new and improved cross-wound cop having end pieces or disks carried by a core and contacting with the wound mass. It is especially useful in connection with sewing machine cops. It further has for its object to provide a crosswound cop in which the peripheries of the wound mass are in close engagement with the end pieces of the cop and in which such engagement is not destroyed by a slight swelling of the wound mass.

Another object of my invention is to produce a new and improved cop having a wound mass and end pieces contacting under tension with the peripheral portions of the end faces and acting to prevent the, thread, while being unwound, from being caught between themass and the end pieces throughout the unwinding of the cop.

The following is a description of a cop embodying my invention and my method of producing the same, reference being had to theaccom-panying drawings, in which,

Fig. 1 shows an embossed strip anddies for forming the same, from which strip the end pieces of the cop are subsequently formed;

Fig. 2 shows the dies retracted and the strip moved along into position for the next impression;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the strip of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 shows in section the parts of the cop about to be assembled, together with dies, for assembling the same;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view of the parts and dies of Fig. 4, with the dies in assembling position;

Fig. 6 shows the partially completed cop after it has been acted upon by the dies of Fig. 5;

Fig. '7 shows the dies for the final upsetting of the core and final pressure of themass, together with the cop in its final form; and

Fig. 8 shows a cop made according to my invention with the thread of the mass partially unwound so as to show the action of the end pieces under those conditions.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, 2 is a strip of stiff paper, such as tag stock, having perforated embossed portions which are subsequently cut into perforated disks. 4 and 6 are the embossing dies for forming the embossed strip, and 8 is a plunger for perforating this strip to form a central hole in the disk. The embossing dies, as usual in embossing, are heated in a suitable manner (not shown) and the strip, before it is acted upon by the dies, is slightly moistened by means, not shown, so as to receive,

and retain the desired set. The embossed porthe faces of the embossing dies.

The embossing dies are provided with internal and external beveled surfaces 3--3', respectively, which form reversed crimps 5 and 7.

The embossed strips are then fed to an assembling machine substantially as shown in Patent No. 1,523,405, granted'to M. Curry, et al., January 20, 1925, having coacting plungers '10 which, as they pass through dies 12, cut out the disks from the embossed strip 2, 14 being cop centering plungers. These disks have the reversed crimps 5 and 7 and also an external fiange 15.

The double crimp in the end pieces, resulting in the reverse angles 5 and 7 and the peripheral flange assist in insuring the tension in the end pieces, tending to set or fix their form. and reduce their tendency to flatten out either under pressure or under unfavorable atmospheric conditions when the cop is in final form. The plungers 10 have internally beveled peripheries 11. 16 is a mass of thread cross-wound upon a core 18 as it comes from the winding machine. The wind shown is the well known Universal wind. The ends of the core project slightly from the mass. The mass in winding tends to bow out slightly at the points 20. 22 are the end disks or pieces cut out from the embossed strip. They are carried forward by the plungers 10 along the plungers 14 and forced by the plungers 10 over the ends of the tubular core. After the end pieces are forced upon the ends of the core a movement of the plungers 14, which are provided with coreexpanding shoulders 24, causes them to slightly expand the ends of the cores, as shown in Figs. 5 and 6, so as to hold the end pieces somewhat loosely thereon. The plungers 10 simultaneously compress the wound mass and force the disks into close contact therewith, the compression at the peripheral parts of the ends of the mass being greater than at points remote therefrom and such as to form beveled zones 25 with which the beveled parts of the disks contact. The disks, however, are resilient, and when the plungers 10 are retracted and the partially assembled cop released, the end pieces 22 along zones 23 remote from their peripheries retract slightly from the wound mass so as to be out of close contact therewith, as shown at 26, Fig. 6. This slight retraction, above referred to, is augmented by the angular difference between internally beveled peripheries of plungers 10, Fig. 4, and internally beveled portions of disks 22. The thread mass conforming to the angles of plungers 10, the tension of the disks 22 forces the zones 23 away from the thread mass.

The partially assembled cop is then placed in a finishing press in which the ends of the core 18 are fully upset and in which the wound mass is subjected to further pressure. The dies and plunger of this finishing press are shown in Fig. '7 in retracted position after they have performed their function and been withdrawn from the cop, leaving the cop in completely finished form. The finishing press is provided with a plunger 28 for centering the cops and preventing internal collapse. The two pressure plungers 30 have flat parallel pressure surfaces 32 and core-crimping anvils 34. By this finishing press the ends of the core are upset so as to securely hold the end disks in place and the thread mass is further compressed. This further compression extends the flat surfaces of the wound mass slightly beyond those formed by the action of the plungers 10 but not so far as to eliminate the beveled zones in the mass. As the plungers 30 are withdrawn, the spring tension of the end pieces causes their intermediate portions 23 to move away from the wound mass so as to form enlarged air spaces 36. These air spaces taper in both directions, the inward tapering being the slighter.

With the bobbin thus produced, the end pieces are held under tension and contact with the beveled peripheral portions of the wound mass. These peripheral portions, on account of the form of the dies used, are inclined toward one another and the contacting portions of the end pieces are correspondingly inclined. The portions of the opposite faces of the wound mass adjacent to the beveled portions are substantially parallel and are spaced away from the end pieces, so that if swelling of the wound mass due to any cause, such as the absorption of moisture, takes place at those points, such swelling does not act directly upon those disks at those points so as to separate the outer edges of the disks from the mass.

This separation of the edges of the disks from the periphery of the mass upon the swelling of the cop has been one of the problems to be solved in connection with the manufacture of such cops and the construction of the cop described and produced by the method described is believed to practically solve that problem.

As the cop is unwound, the end pieces, on account of their spring tension, tend to move toward one another and when unwound to the extent shown in Fig. 8, the end pieces contact with the parallel portions of the end faces of the mass and furthermore the peripheries of the disks extend inward toward the medial line of the mass to such an extent as to guide the threadbeing unwound away from the under faces of the mass so as to still further reduce the liability of having the thread catch between the mass and the end pieces.

With the construction of bobbin shown, the end pieces are always in close contact with the peripheral portions of the end faces of the wound mass. The beveled periphery of the mass in itself, however, tends to prevent the thread when being unwound slipping over the end of the mass and so long as it is present acts, in conjunction with the portions of the end disks, to practically insure that the thread will not so slip. The zonal spacing away of the end pieces from the annular faces of the wound mass permits the expansion above referred to, without distorting the disks so as to form an opening between the periphery of the disks and the mass when the cop is full. During all stages of unwinding the disks are kept in contact with the peripheral portions of the end faces of the mass, and during those periods when the pressure is reduced the peripheries of the disks guide the unwound thread toward the medial line and away from the point where the disk and mass contact. Any expansion of the thread mass at its periphery causes the disks to bend or move around points adjacent to the ends of the core as an axis so as not to interfere substantially with the spacing between the end pieces and the mass. On account of the bevels on the mass, and the end pieces contacting therewith, and the overhang of the disks when the cop is partially unwound, the thread as it is unwound is never in the plane of adjacent portions of the end faces of the mass so as to be liable to slip between the mass and the end pieces.

As will be evident to those skilled in the art, my invention permits various modifications without departing from the spirit thereof or the scope of the appened claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a cop, a core, a mass of thread crosswound thereon, end disks secured to said core having their peripheries in engagement with the peripheries of the end faces of said mass, having portions adjacent said core in engagement with the end faces of the mass and having a zone within their peripheries spaced away from said wound mass.

2. In a cop, a core, a mass of thread crosswound thereon, end disks secured to the ends of said core, the end faces of said mass having externally beveled peripheries and said end pieces having internally beveled faces held in engagement therewith under tension, said end pieces having zones within their beveled portions spaced away from said wound mass.

3. In a cop, a core, a mass of thread crosswound thereon, end disks secured to the ends of said core, the end faces of said mass having externally beveled peripheries and said end pieces having internally beveled faces held in engagement therewith under tension, said end pieces having zones within their beveled portions spaced away from said wound mass, the portions of the end faces of the mass along said zones being substantially flat and parallel.

4. In a cop, a core, a mass of thread wound on the core, and disks of resilient paper secured to the ends of the core, said disks having inwardly beveled marginal portions engaging the end faces of the thread mass and having flanged portions extending beyond the periphery of the thread mass and at an angle to the outer edges of said beveled marginal portions.

5. The method of producing a cop which comprises cross winding a mass of thread on a core, applying to the ends of the mass centrally perforated end pieces of resilient material having their outer marginal portions beveled inwardly, pressing said end pieces against the mass by means of dies conforming substantially to the outer surfaces of the end pieces except their bevelled portions are at a lesser angle, so as to cause the ends of the mass and said end pieces to take the form of the faces of said dies, and securing the end pieces to the ends of the core, whereby in the resulting product the beveled marginal portions of the end pieces are caused to tightly hug adjacent portions of the mass while the pressure of the portions of the end pieces between their beveled portions and their inner the core and disks oi resilient material secured at the ends of the core, said disks being 01 a concave form with respect to their inner surfaces and engaging the sides of the mass of thread. and'said disks having flanges projecting a distance beyond the periphery of the mass of thread and bent outwardly with relation to the adjacent portions of the disks so as to position the edges of their inner sides out of the path of the thread as it-is being drawn from the mass.

7. In a cop, a core, a mass of thread cross wound on the core, end disks secured to the ends of the core, the end. Iaces of said mass having their outertmargins beveled inwardly and said end disks having peripheral portions beveled inwardly at an angle with relation to the portions or the disks within said peripheral portions and held in engagement with said beveled marginal portions 01' the ends of the mass under tension,

the mass between its beveled portions being highly compressed" compared with the portions of the mass adjacent to said beveled portions.

8. In a thread cop, acore, amass of thread cross wound on the core, end disks of resilient material secured to the ends of the core having their peripheral portions beveled inwardly and their portions within said peripheral portions beveled outwardly from their central portions, said peripheral portions of the disks engaging under tension similarly beveled portions of the end faces of the thread mass.

9. A thread cop having a core, a mass of thread wound on the core, and disks of resilient material at the ends of the core engaging under tension at least the outer margins of the end faces of the thread mass and having flanges inclined with relation to said thread-engaging portions thereof, the outer surfaces of the flanges being at an angle of less than 180 degrees to said threadengaging portions.

- DICKERSON G. BAKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2457094 *Feb 24, 1945Dec 21, 1948Gen Cable CorpMethod of packaging wire
US2475399 *Apr 5, 1946Jul 5, 1949Lloyd E Cone Thread CoThread bobbin and method of making
US2712804 *Nov 2, 1951Jul 12, 1955Threads IncThread package
US2918886 *Apr 24, 1956Dec 29, 1959Coats & ClarkBobbins
US5463795 *Mar 2, 1994Nov 7, 1995The Stanley WorksConcealed bearing hinge and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/169, 16/386, 242/159, 16/380
International ClassificationB65H54/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2701/31, B65H54/18
European ClassificationB65H54/18