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Publication numberUS1962357 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1934
Filing dateOct 27, 1932
Priority dateOct 27, 1932
Also published asDE613009C
Publication numberUS 1962357 A, US 1962357A, US-A-1962357, US1962357 A, US1962357A
InventorsNessler Charles
Original AssigneePro Ker Lab Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for measuring the growth or production of hair
US 1962357 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 12, 1934. NESSLER 1,962,357

MEANS FOR MEASURING THE GROWTH OR PRODUCTION OF HAIR Filed Oct. 27; 1952 INVENTOR ATTORN EY Patented June 12, 1934 UNETED STATES PATENT OFFICE MEANS FOR MEASURING THE GROWTH OR PRODUCTIQN OF HAIR Application October 27,

9 Claims.

My invention relates to the growth or production of human hair and it is especially adapted for use by barber's, hairdressers and others whose Work or occupation has to do with the various troubles and ailments of the hair of the public, and this application is in part a continuation of my pending application for U. 5. Letters Patent, filed November 24, 1928, Serial No. 321,698, for means for ascertaining the hair production of a subject.

I have devised novel and improved means for observing and recording the growth or production of hair growing on the scalp, with special reference to its treatment.

One of the principles underlying my invention is the noting of the growth or production of hair of a particular scalp, in order to establish a first status quo as to thickness or profusion and then by subsequent measurings, noting any deviation from the primary measuring, as for instance, a loss of hair or a gain, as a result of adopted treatments.

I have illustrated types of my invention in the accompanying drawing, wherein;

Figure 1 shows a perspective View of a portion of a human head and part of the scalp, with a comb and my improved instrument being applied to the hair, so as to gather the hair from a given plot on the scalp in strand form; the gathering fork and part of the compression cavity or recess of the instrument only being shown.

Figure 2 shows a top-plan view of a portion of the instrument, including the gathering fork and communicating recess or sot, with a quantity of gathered hair shown as filling the fork and entering the gage recess.

Figure 3 shows a similar View to Fig. 2, but with the gathered quantity of hair moved into the recess at the base of the fork, by pressure of the finger which is shown in broken-lines.

Figure 4 shows a top-plan view of the complete instrument, with the gathered bunch of hair compressed transversely of its length into the compression cavity ready to have the extent of such compression marked on the recording means.

Figure 5 shows an enlarged perspective view of a portion of the frame of the device at the opposite end from the collecting fork and with the recording means connected thereto and shown as partly broken away.

Figure 6 shows a vertical cross-sectional view of the instrument, the plane of the section being indicated by line 6-6, in Fig. 4.

Figure 7 shows a longitudinal cross-sectional 1932, Serial No. 639,924

view of the recording means, the plane of the section being indicated by line '77, in Fig. 4.

Figure 8 shows a plan view of part of the marking means of a modified form.

Figure 9 shows a plan view of the six-inch tape used for locating the spot or place on the scalp where the hair is to be. gathered for measurement.

Referring to the accompanying drawing, in which like numerals of reference designate like parts throughout, 1 indicates the frame or body of the instrument or device and it is preferably made from a fiat strip of resilient metal. This strip or plate is doubled on itself so as to provide a pair of fiat parallel members or jaws 2 and 3, spaced slightly apart and one longer than the other; the longer one 3, having its outer end formed into a V-shaped fork 4, with the bottom or crotch thereof communicating with a com.- pression or gage notch or slot 5, formed in member 3, and extending inwardly a suitable distance along the median line of the member. The shorter member 2, has its outer end terminating at about the level of the bottom of fork 4, in the opposing member 3, and it is formed with a mouth 6, leading into a compression slot or notch 7, formed in member 2; said notches 5 and '7, being duplicates of the same dimensions arranged in alinement so that they function as a single notch or slot in compression of the hair strand when inserted therein.

The folded end of the frame is fashioned into a handle 8, to be grasped by the hand of the operator in manipulating the device and the two spring members 2 and 3, are held firmly together at the handle-end by means of rivets 9.

The mouth of the fork 4, is preferably 1 and ths of an inch wide and is of a given capacity such that it will embrace and gather the hair growing on an area of l and /2 square-inches of the scalp. The gage or compression cavity or recess 5-7, into which the fork leads, is nd of an inch wide and of indefinite length or depth, although I have here shown it as about two inches long.

A manually operated plunger or compression member 10, is detachably mounted in the notch or recess so that it may be freely reciprocated therein, and it is inserted in and removed there from at the open end thereof. The body or main part of the compressor when in place, is disposed between the two jaws 2 and 3, in slidable relation therewith, and it is provided upon its opposite sides with outwardly extending projections 11 and 12, the former extending through slot 7,

of member 2, and the latter through slot 5, of member 3. These lateral projections travel freely in said slots and serve to guide the presser 10, and also act to compress the inserted hair-strand along with the body of the presser.

Upon the frame 1, I detachably mount recording means 13, by means of which a permanent mark is made on a record sheet or surface 14, having a graduated scale 15. The record sheet is mounted between a pair of manually operated parallel rollers 16, 1'7, which are constructed alike, each being a cylindrical tube with its walls formed with oppositely arranged longitudinal slits 18, 19, and the sheet 14, is attached to the rollers by passing its respective ends through the slits 18 and 19, of the rollers, and around the exterior of the rollers so as to extend from one to the other with the capacity of being unrolled from one roller and taken up by the other; the sheet being thus transferable from one roller to the other. The rollers are mounted in a frame-work or casing 20, so that they may be turned in either direction on their axes; they are mounted alike, one end being placed in bearing 21, formed in the end of the casing by spinning over a rim 22, and the other end in a bearing 23, at the opposite end of the casing where a rim 24 is formed within which is a collar 25, secured to the roller, so as to hold the roller against endwise movement in the opposite direction. This latter end of the roller is closed and projects a sufficient distance beyond the casing to afford a hand-grasp 26, for turning the roller in either direction on its axis by hand. See particularly Fig. '7. By turning the roller 17, in the direction of movement of the hands of a clock, the sheet 14, is wound thereon and unwound from roller 16. By reversing this operation and turning roller 16, in the opposite direction, the sheet is wound on that roller and unwound from the other. The operation of the rollers serves to shift the record-sheet 14, back and forth across the platen or support 2'7, which is fixed across the casing 20, as shown in Fig. 6. The roller 17, is housed by a removable portion 28, of the casing, such portion being U-shaped and open at its ends, so that the spring metal of which it is made permits of its being snapped over the end of casing 20, and held in place, at the same time it may be easily removed by pulling it away from the casing. The opposite ends of casing 20, are extended to provide arms 29, 30, which are formed at their free ends with inwardly projecting attaching lugs 31, 32, which are adapted to take into openings 33, 34, formed respectively in the frame members 2 and 3. See Fig. 6. This permits of the recording device being detachably mounted on the frame, by squeezing the members 2 and 3, together, and then inserting the lugs 31, 32, in their respective holes 33, 34, in said members. The recording device may be easily dismounted from the frame by squeezing the members 2, 3, together and then disengaging the lugs therefrom. As the portion 28, of the casing is removable, the roller 1'7, may

37, and the free end of the finger is provided with a tubular holder 38, for carrying marking means 39, such as a pencil-lead or ink-marker, which makes contact with the surface of the subjacent record-sheet 14, so that the relative lateral movement between the two will cause a horizontal mark to be made on the sheet.

The record sheet 14, is provided with a graduated-scale 15, which is shown as running from O to 34, and reading from the lower part of the sheet upwardly to the top edge. The graduations are shown as s -nd of an inch apart, with the numerals 0, 8, 16, 24 and 32, written on the scale so as to indicate these values respectively on the scale. The arm 35, of the presser 10, is so arranged that when the presser stands at the lowest point in the compression cavity or slot 5--7, the marker 39, will stand at zero on the scale of the record sheet 14, and the marks are made in a line disposed parallel with the lines of the scale, so that the value of each mark may be quickly observed. 01 course, the graduations of the scale may have arbitrary values with which to compare each recorded mark as it is made on the sheet, although I have here shown the value as being -nd of an inch.

In Fig. 8, I show a modified form of the marker arm 35", having a horizontal or longitudinal opening 38 through which a pencil may be moved to make the mark on a stationary record sheet, instead of a traveling sheet.

In using the instrument, the parts thereof are assembled as shown in Fig. 4, but with the presser or plunger 10, removed. In order to standardize the measurements or tests and the records taken at each measurement upon the head of the same person, a testing plot or place for the measurement is first selected on the scalp indicated at 40, in Fig. 1, preferably on the top and located a distance rearwardly from the bridge of the nose at 41, equal to between 6 and 7 and inches. I herewith show a plot-locating tape 42, made of flexible material with a metal tip 43, which is formed with a transverse curve or arch 44, for fitting the depression at the bridge of the nose. This tape may be assumed to be 'Y-inches long and it is applied to the head by placing the bowed metal tip at the nose-bridge and then drawing the tape upwardly and backwardly over the scalp, as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 1. In this case the selected plot for measurement would be G-inches distance from the nose-bridge, the tape being shown flattened out in Fig. 9, and as applied in Fig. l; the fork is guided by space 49 on the tape.

In locating the plot or spot, the hair is first parted as indicated at 45, in Fig. 1, then the comb 46, having a row of teeth covering a length of 1 and /;th inches, is placed in the hair at the forehead and the hair combed back as indicated at 47, with the tooth at the outer end of the comb tracking in the parting, the combing extending back over the plot or spot G-inches, more or less, back and from where the lot of hair is to be gathered for the measurement. While the comb holds the hair portion 47, thus combed back in somewhat taut condition, the kerascopic fork 4, preferably 1 and %ths of an inch wide, is pushed along the scalp, transversely of the parting and over the selected spot or place and until the fork is filled with the hair 47, as indicated in Fig. 2. When thus The presser 10,

which has a weight of 12 grams, is then inserted in the recess 57, so as to engage the hair strand confined therein and compress it transversely of its length. In the initial action of the presser, I apply with the hand a sharp pressing or squeezing action fora moment and then release such pressure after compacting the hair, and leave the presser to act with its own weight. The full weight of th'e'presser 10, may be brought into play upon the hair strand thus compressed, by tipping the head of the subject to one side so as to bring the slot 5'7, into a substantially vertical position. When the final position of the presser is reached, the recording device arm 35,-is pressed down by hand to bringthe marker 39, in firm contact with therecord-sheet 14, which isthen caused to travel about a half-inch under the marker, by'turning the roller 1'7. In this way the size of the compressed strand or the extent or degree to which the gathered hair strand 47, has been compressed in its confined cavity, is permanently recorded on the sheet.

I find that the desired results may be obtained in the use of my improved instrument, by merely taking the readings periodically made on the record sheet at the different measurements of the hair growing in the same selected place or spot on the scalp of the same individual, by employing the same confined recess or slot in which the gathered hair is compressed; the hair being gathered by the same sized fork or enclosure and the same amount of force exerted in the compressing action. In other words, if the several essential factors are kept constant in the case of tests of the hair of the same person, the records thus obtained in her or his behalf, will possess definite value in reference to the growth or production of the hair, and the diagnosis made from such data will determine the physical tonics, or the treatment to be recommended or prescribed to such person.

In some forms of the record-sheet 14, I propose to use on the graduated scale, a broad distinctive band or zone 15, running longitudinally of the sheet in the direction in which it is moved and covering its width from the twentyfourth to the twenty-ninth graduated line, that is snds of an inch; vertical lines being here shown for the band to indicate a color, such as red. The

"j lower edge of the band at the twenty-fourth graduation of the scale marks what may be considered as the minimum of the scalps hair growing capacity, while the upper edge at the twenty ninth scale line, indicates the maximum growth.

. Any normal scalp should grow sufficient hair for the recording means to give a reading reaching to the twenty-fourth line of the scale, before hair substances of the body should find outlets on the limbs or on mens chests.

By virtue of my present improvements in this art, I am enabled to keep records of the current growth of the hair and to note variations in the quantity being produced by a person, whether it is becoming sparse or thin, or is maintaining its regular and expected yield. When a deficiency is observed in the production, certain treatments may be adopted to increase the growth or to maintain its flourishing condition.

I wish to be understood as not limiting my invention to the specific constructions and arrangements of the various parts as herein shown, as it is manifest that modifications may be made in the same without, however, departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. In mechanism for ascertaining the density of growth of filaments of the hair growing upon the scalp of a person, a device having means in which the bunch of hair filaments growing in an area of given size upon the scalp may be confined, means movable into said confining means and adapted to compress the confined bunch of hair transversely of its length in said confining means, and recording means including means controlled by the movement of said compressing means.

2. In mechanism for ascertaining the density of the growthof. filaments of the hair growing upon the scalp of a person, a member having means in which a bunch of hair may be confined, means on said member having a hair-receiving opening of predetermined size or capacity-for gathering in a bunch the hair filaments growing in a certain area upon the scalp and directing said hair into said confining means, means movable into said confining means and adapted to compress there in the said bunch of hair transversely of its length, and means controlled by the movement of said compressing means for indicating the size of the compressed bunch or the extent or degree to which said bunch of hair is compressed.

3. In mechanism for ascertaining the density of growth of filaments of the hair growing upon the human scalp, a device having means in which the bunch of hair filaments growing in an area of certain size upon the scalp may be confined, means movable into said confining means and adapted to compress the confined bunch of hair transversely of its length in said confining means, and recording means releasably attachable to said device and including means controlled by the movement of said compressing means during the compressing action.

4. In mechanism of the class described, means for gathering in a bunch the hair growing in a certain area on the human sca p and comprising a device having a pair of oppositely arranged spring members having hair gathering forked ends and provided each with a slot communicatcompress the bunch of hair confined therein, and

recording means including means controlled by the movement of said compressing means, said recording means being provided with means for releasably gripping said spring members so as to detachably mount the recording means thereon.

5. In apparatus for ascertaining the production of growing hair in a plot of given size. a frame provided with an opening for receiving the hair gathered from a certain sized plot on the scalp, said frame having a compression space or slot communicating with said hair-receiving opening and into which the hair therefrom is moved transversely of its length, a device for compressing said hair in said space transversely of its length with a given amount of pressure, and means for indicating the extent to which the hair is compressed in said space.

6. In apparatus for ascertaining the density of the growth of filaments of the hair growing upon the scalp of a person, means for receiving and confining in a bunch the filaments growing in an area of given size upon the scalp, means movable into said receiving-means adapted to impart a uniformly compacting force upon the said bunch of hair transversely of its length, and means controlled by the movement of said compacting means for indicating the extent to which said bunch oi. hair is compacted.

I. In apparatus for ascertaining the density of the growth of the filaments of hair growing upon the scalp oi a person, means having a cavity for receiving in a bunch the filaments of hair growing in a plot of known area upon the scalp, means comprising an element movable into said cavity and adapted to uniformly compact therein the bunch of hair transversely of its length, and means controlled by the movement of said element for indicating the size of the compacted bunch or the extent or degree to which said bunch of hair is compacted.

8. In apparatus for ascertaining the density of the growth of the filaments of hair growing upon the scalp of a person, means having a cavity for receiving in a bunch the filaments of hair growing in a plot of given area upon the scalp, means comprising an element movable into and closing said cavity and adapted to uniform y compact therein the said bunch of hair transversely of its length, and means actuated in response to the movement of said element for indicating the size of the compacted bunch of hair.

9. In apparatus for ascertaining the density of the growth of filaments of the hair growing upon the scalp of a person, a device having a cavity of given width for receiving in a bunch the filaments of hair growing in an area of known size upon the scalp, means comprising an element movable into and closing said cavity and adapted to uniformly compact therein the bunch of hair transversely of its length, and means controlled by the movement of said element for indicating the height of the compacted bunch of hair in said cavity.

CHARLES NESSLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4170827 *Dec 7, 1977Oct 16, 1979Maurice KatzApparatus for measuring hair growth
US5327656 *Sep 14, 1992Jul 12, 1994Joseph NissimovDevice for overall diameter measurement of a group of hairs or fibers (ODMOGH)
US5702287 *Jun 7, 1995Dec 30, 1997Haney; Donald E.Sander with orbiting platen and abrasive
US6993851 *Apr 16, 2004Feb 7, 2006Bernard Cohen Technology, LlcMethod and device for measuring fluctuations in the cross-sectional area of hair in a pre-determined scalp area
US7131208 *Apr 13, 2005Nov 7, 2006Bernard Cohen Technology, LlcMethod, device and cartridge for measuring fluctuations in the cross-sectional area of hair in a pre-determined scalp area
US7246447 *Mar 17, 2005Jul 24, 2007Alexis Sydney DemkoApparatus and method for forming designs in a haired surface
USRE41046 *Oct 1, 2007Dec 22, 2009Bernard Cohen Technology, LlcMethod, device and cartridge for measuring fluctuations in the cross-sectional area of hair in a pre-determined scalp area
CN100475139CApr 15, 2005Apr 8, 2009伯纳德科恩科技有限责任公司Method, device and cartridge for measuring fluctuations in the cross-sectional area of hair in a pre-determined scalp area
EP1734863A1 *Apr 15, 2005Dec 27, 2006Bernard H. CohenMethod, device and cartridge for measuring fluctuations in the cross-sectional area of hair in a pre-determined scalp area
WO2002021968A1 *Sep 7, 2001Mar 21, 2002Mcclaine Elayne PHair thinning measurement device
WO2005102164A1 *Apr 15, 2005Nov 3, 2005Bernard H CohenMethod, device and cartridge for measuring fluctuations in the cross-sectional area of hair in a pre-determined scalp area
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/512, 346/143, 346/95
International ClassificationA61B5/107
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/1072, A61B5/448
European ClassificationA61B5/44D, A61B5/107B