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Publication numberUS1963048 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1934
Filing dateApr 28, 1930
Priority dateOct 24, 1928
Publication numberUS 1963048 A, US 1963048A, US-A-1963048, US1963048 A, US1963048A
InventorsCowdery Robert H
Original AssigneeAmerican Fork & Hoe Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of drawing tubes
US 1963048 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 12, 1934. R. H. COWDERY METHOD OF DRAWING TUBES Filed April 28, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEY;

June 12, 1934. R. H. cowDERY 1,963,043

METHOD OF DRAWING TUBES Filed April 28. 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 MENTOR ATTORNEYS June 12, 1934. R. H. COWDERY METHOD OF DRAWING TUBES Filed April 28,1930 '5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR #1- ATTORNEYS.

June 12, 1934.

R. H. COWDERY METHOD OF DRAWING TUBES Filed April 28, 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 June 12, 1934. R. H. COWDERY 1,963,048

METHOD OF DRAWING TUBES Filed April 28, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 v INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Patented June 12, 1334 1,963,048 METHOD or DRAWING-TUBES Robert H.

The American Ohio, a corporation of\ Originalapplication October 24, 1928,v

and this application 314,650. Divided 1930, Serial No. 447,878

Cowdery, Geneva, Ohio,

Fork & Hoe Company,

assignor to Cleveland, Ohio Serial No. All! 28:

13 Claims.- (Cl. 205- 8) My invention relates to improvements in tube drawing and relates more particularly to improvedmethods forchanging the form of a cylindrical tube to a different form wherein portions,

at least, of the tube are reduced in diameter relative to other portions.

This application is a' divisional application of my copending application Serial No. 314,650; filed October 24, 1928, for Press for tubes.

An object of my invention is to provide for the drawing of a tube of approximately cylindrical form to a difierent form, wherein portions at least of the tube, are reduced in diameter.

Another object of my invention is to provide forthe drawing of tubes in successive operations whereby difierent portions of thelength of the tubes are successively operated upon to efiect an aggregate resultof producing a tube of progressively decreased dfimeter toward one of its ends.

Another object of my invention is to accomplish the progressive reduction in diameter of a metallic tube toward one of its ends in an eflicient and expeditious manner.

Another object of my invention is to accomplish at a relatively rapid rate the production of metallic tubes, from. approximately cylindrical tubes, wherein the produced tubes are reduced in diameter in portions of their lengt Another object of my invention is to provide for the drawing of tubes to a form having steppedportions of progressively decreased diameter. The aforesaid and other objects of my invention will become more apparent from the following description of an embodiment of my invention, in which reference will be had to the accompanying drawings illustrating a machine which is an embodiment of my invention.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view partially in elevation and partially in section of the lower portion of a machine embodying the principles of my invention.

Fi .'2 is an elevational view of the upper portion of the machine;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the machine;

Fig. 4 is a view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1, but with portions of a traveling head, illustrated in the foregoing figures, omitted;

Fig. 5 is an elevational view ofa type of arbor and mandrel and operating mechanism therefor, employed in the said embodiment;

Fig. 6 is a view taken on the line 6---6 of Fig. 5 looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a vertical medial sectional view of the ''upper portion of a supporting ring and die tube employed in the said embodiment, and showing such as may be formed by 'rods 14 by suitable nuts '4, and the the mechanism used to-secure the die tube to the mechanism;

- Fig. 8 is a vertical medial sectional view of the lower portion of the die tube of Fig. 7 with a portion of a lower supporting ring therefor, being shown;

Fig. 9 is an elevational-view of a section of the die tube showing a dieaperture therein:

Fig. .10 is a view taken on the line 10-10 of Fig.

9, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 11 is a view of a finished tubular shaft the'operation of the press of the said embodimentl'applied as a'shaft for a golf club; r

Fig. 12 is avertlcal medial sectional view of the travelling head and revolving arbor plate, and appurtenances thereto;

Fig. 13 is a view of a portion of the top bolt ring with the ratchet stop trip attached thereto;

- Fig. 14 is a plan view of a portion of the revolving plate ratchet;

Fig. 15 is a bottom plan view of the ratchet stop trip hanger;

Figs. 16 and. 1'1 are elevational and plan views, respectively, of the die' bushing as used in my inso vention; and g Fig. 18 is an elevational view of the lower ratchet reverse bar.

Figs. 19, 20 and 21 arecross-sectional views to an enlarged scale taken respectively from the planes 19, 20 and 21 of Fig. 11 and illustrating the change of wall thickness in the tube which may occur during the operation thereon of the machine embodying my invention.

Referring to the figures of drawings, in all of which like parts are designated by like reference characters, my machine comprises generally a base portion and a movable head, as best shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Suitable legs 12 are provided; for supporting the machine upon afloor, it sible to suspend a part below the legs, below the floor line. A plurality of threaded rods 14 are provided to hold the various parts of the frame in spaced longitudinal relation. The frame generally comprises, a

lower ring 1 adapted to support a fluid pressure cylinder 52,'beingsecured to the rods disposed adjacent the periphery of the ring, being spaced equally. Next above the cylinder supp'orting ring is a ring 2 adapted to support the lower ends of a tubes 25 the ring 2 being held in spaced relation to .the cylinder supporting ring by nuts which threadedly engage the rod 14 and the upper and lower faces of ring 2. The legs 12 are secured to 110 being poswith the rods ,14, a plurality of the rods 14 by a suitable clamp 13 and bolts 11. At the top end of the rods 14 is the bed ring 3 held in position upon the upper ends of the rods by clamping nuts. A plurality of tubes 25 each containing a plurality of superposed guide bushings 5 are arranged in an arcuate row, and supported between the bottom tube ring and the bed ring. Thebushings 5 are preferably of equal length, and are interchangeable-with each other and dies 7 are adapted to be carried within certain of the bushings such as that shown at 6, Figs. 16 and 17, so that the die supporting bushing 6 containing the die 7 may be disposed within the tube at different longitudinally disposed positions for purposes later explained.

In Fig. 1, I have shown a die 7 at the top of the tube, and I preferably place the dies, in each succeeding arcuately disposed tube, one step lower until the last die, in this case, the eighteenth die is in the lower end of the last or eighteenth tube. The dies and bushings are inserted in the tube, and the lower bushing, Fig. 5, is held in place by a set screw 8 projected through a threaded aperture in the die tube into a slot 9 0f the bushing, and retains the die and die bushings within the tube.

The bottom tube supporting ring 2 is provided with a plurality of spaced vertical apertures 10, the number depending upon the number of die tubes to be placed in the machine, in this instance, eighteen. The diameter of the apertures is increased adjacent the upper surface of the ring at 15, Fig. 5, to provide a socket to receive therein, the end bushing 74, whose end of smaller diameter extends through the ring aperture. A'bore 17 is provided extending longitudinally through the bushing. superposed upon each bushing 74, is a tube guide cup 18'of generally. circular form fitting snugly within the enlarged portion 15 of the aperture 10 and projecting slightly above the upper surface of the bottom tube ring. The upper surface of the guide cup is provided with a flared recess adapted to receive the lower end of a tube 25 lined with bushings 5 and 6.

In placing the die tube in the machine, the die supporting tube may beinserted through the aperture in the bed ring, andlowered down tov the tube guide cup, or it may be inserted in the aperture in the bed ring from the under side, so thatthe tube extends into the aperture and the bottom end of thetube is then slid over into the tube guide cup.

The apertures 19 in the bed ring 3 are equally arcuately spaced and aligned vertically with the apertures 10 ofthe tube supporting ring 2. An internally threaded tube locking bushing 23, as best shown in Fig. 7 is driven into each aperture 19 from the lower side of the bed ring, and engaging by a flange 24, with a shoulder 26 formed in the bed ring to limit upward movement of the bushing when being placed.

After the tubes 25 have been placedtnpon the guide cups 15, the. upper end of each tube is aligned with the bore of the bushing 23, and a locking member 20 is screwed into the bushing, until the lower reduced end 21'of the locking plug enters the space in the upper portion of the die tube. The tube 25 is preferably of such a length as to leave a slight space in its upper end above the uppermost bushing. The locking plug 20 comprises a lower reduced portion 21 of circular crosssection fitting snugly within the die tube 25, and an intermediate enlarged threaded portion 22 adapted to be received within the threaded locking bushing 23. Suitable notches, one of which is shown at 27,,are provided, for screwing the locking plug home with a spanner wrench, and the upper end is provided with a reduced portion 28 also of circular cross-section adapted to project within a funnel shaped bushing 31. A bore 29 is provided extending longitudinally through the plug and adapted to tube.

The funnel bushing 31 is made sufiiciently small, as to fit loosely in itsassociated aperture 19 of the bed ring and has a flange 32 adjacent its upper edge, and is provided with a funnel shaped boreportion 33, which aligns with the flared walls of the plug 20, the upper end 28 nf which is fitted snugly within the lower cylindrical portion 34 of the bushing 31. A plurality of inclined oil holes 35, disposed below the flange 32 lead into 'the flared funnel bore 33 to supply lubricating oil during the operation of the machine.

The bushings, within the die tube are substantially cylindrical in form with aligned-bores extending continuously throughout their aggregate lengths. In each tube, as well illustrated in Fig. 1 and Fig. 7, the bushings disposed below the die supporting bushing have cylindrical bores of substantially the same diameters, while those in the remaining tubes, positioned above the die, are each of progressively smaller diameter towards the die. Also in each successive tube proceeding in order, arcuately around the machine, the lower bushings are of progressively less and less relative diameter. Therefore in the last tube, not shown, wherein the die is at the bottom of the tube, the bushings above the die are all of progressively smaller bore proceeding from the top of the tube towards the die, to conform to thecontour of the drawn tube; and the guide bushing 74 below the die is provided with a bore of substantially the same diameter as that of the superposed die. The die bushing 6 which holds the die, Figs. 7, 16 and 17, is substantially cylindrical, and has the bore enlarged at 36, in its upper portion, and an aperture 36' is provided in the side wall to allow the die 7 to be inserted therein. Each die has a bore 37 which is adapted to align with the bore inner wall converges downwardly adjacent the upper end to form a constricted drawing orifice 38 Each die tube has an aperture 40in the wall thereof, through which the die may be inserted in the die bushing without removing the die bushing. The die is held securely in the die bushing by a rectangular plate 41 which is held by a clamp 42 encircling the tube. The plate 41 is provided with a boss 43, extending into the die tube, and which has an arcuate vertical groove 44 adapted to engage the outer surface of the die. The apertures 40 in each succeeding die tube are placed progressively nearer the bottom of the tube; the aperture in the first tube being adjacent the top of the tube, while that in the last tube is adjacent the lower end.

Secured to the bed ring 3 are a plurality of upstanding traveling head guide bolts 45, to the upper end of which is bolted a top bolt ring 46. Telescoped on the guide bolts intermediate the top bolt ring and the bed ring is a traveling head 47.

The traveling head is adapted to be reciprocated between the top' bolt ring and the bed ring on the guide bolts by means of a piston 48 and rod 50. The piston comprises a piston body 48, having suitable packing 49 and is secured to the in the die bushing. The

align with the bores in the longitudinally disposed bushings and dies for the piston rod by a nut 51. The piston and rod are adapted to reciprocate within a cylinder 52 which has an upper and lower head 53 and 54, respectively. The rod extends through a stufling box in the upper head which comprises a stufilng box gland 55, and suitable packing 56, held in place by studs 5'7. The piston is reciprocated in the cylinder by fluid pressure, such as oil under pressure which when introduced into the chamber 58, in the lower cylinder head, by a suitable connection and valve from a hydraulic pump, said valve and pump not being shown, forces the piston upwardly until a predetermined point has been reached, the current of oil then being di verted from the chamber 58 into the chamber 59, which is connected by conduits 60 to the upper head at 61 and into the cylinder above the piston forcing the piston in the opposite direction. The operation may be controlled manually or automatically by a valve mechanism of common construction. The piston rod is provided with a flange 62 spaced from its end, Fig. 12, and the portion 63 above the flange is of reduced diameter and extends througha bore in the traveling head which'is held thereto by a nut 64 screwed upon the threaded end of the rod.

The traveling head large central portion having a'plurality of radiallydisposed vertical guides 94 adapted to reciprocate upon the guide rods 45 disposed at equal points from the center. The guides are each provided with a vertical bore 95 into which are telescoped a traveling head bushing 96. The bushings 96 are threaded at their lower ends and receive thereon lock nuts 9'7. The upper ends are provided with outwardly extending flanges 98 having grooves 99 adjacent the bores. The traveling head is substantially thicker at 100 adjacent its center. A circular channel 101 is provided in the lower face of the head and a revolving arbor plate 102 comprising a metallic ring which has a plurality of threaded apertures 103, arcuately disposed thereon and adapted to receive the threaded ends 69 of a plurality of arbors 65.

The revolving arbor plate of this embodiment is provided with 18 of the threaded apertures 103 each adapted to carry an arbor. The upper face of theplate adjacent the periphery is recessed leaving an upstanding flange 104 adjacent the center which bears against the lower face of the traveling head and which has suitable oil holes 105 therein for lubrication of the contacting surfaces. At oppositely disposed points on the face of the revolving arbor plate is a pair of radially extending keyways 106 which extend from a point spaced from the edge of the arbor plate to the upstanding flange. Disposed upon the arbor plate, about the flange 104 is a revolving ratchet plate 107.

The revolving ratchet plate as best shown in Fig. 14, is a flat metallic ring which has a plurality of notches 108 and teeth 109 in its periphery. A pair of keyways 106' which align with the keyways in the arbor plate, extend from the inner .edge of the ratchet plate to a point spaced from the outer edge. Keys 110 are disposed within the aligned keyways of the arbor plate and revolving ratchet plate preventing relative movement of the arbor plate and ratchet plate.

The revolving arbor plate with the revolving ratchet plate is held with. its channel in the lower face of the traveling head by means of a flat ring 132 disposed about the piston rod and bolted to the traveling head adjacent the the traveling the outer edge 4'? comprises a relatively 3 center by -bolts 133, the outer edge of which overlaps the inner edge 01 the arbor plate. .The

outer edge of the arbor plate heads of the arbor plate.

Each arbor, Fig. 5, comprises a tapered spindle having intermediate its ends aflange 66. A' substantially cylindrical portion 6'7 which is threaded at 68 is provided above the flange. The end is reduced and threaded at 69, and adapted to be screwed into the apertures 103 in the arbor plate. The lower end of the spindle is with pairs of oppositely disposed ears 70, each pair having aligned apertures '71 adapted to hold pivotally therein jaws 72. Telescoped upon the cylindrical portion 67 is a sleeve '73, which comhexagonal portion '75 adapted -'76, which abuts a flange '77 provided at an intermediate portion of the sleeve. The lower portion '78 of the sleeve below the flange is substantially elliptical in cross section, as best shown .in Fig. 6. The jaws '12, are pivoted within the ears '70 by. the pivots '11, and have a pair of upwardly extending actuating levers'79 which are provided with threaded apertures through which adjusting screws 81 provided is supported by a plurality of short arcuate shoes 134 bolted to by bolts 135, which overlapare screwed and locked in position by lock nuts 82.

The-ends of the screws 81 contact with the elliptical surface '73 of the sleeve. Rotation of the wrench by the handle '76 swings the levers '72 outwardly by reason of the camming action of the elliptical surface 73 upon the ends of the screws 81. The lower ends of the jaws '72 are relatively short and are provided with a pair.

of semi-circular jaw faces 83'each held'within -a groove in the inner surface of one of the jaws After each consecutive operation the arbor plate 102 is of degrees to align the arbors with the next preceding die tubes. This continues for each operation and. is accomplished by a tripping mechanism which comprises, an angular lever 136, Fig. 2, pivotally attached to the traveling head at 137, by a bracket 138. As shown in Fig. 2, the horizontal arm of the lever is provided with a-roller 139 rotatably journalled in a yoke on the end of the arm upon a pin 140.

The upwardly extending arm is provided with ball 141 at the end thereof adapted to be engaged by aisocket 142 of a connecting rod 142'. The other end 143 of the connecting rod is attached to an 14'? of a ratchet reverse plate 144. The ratchet reverse plate comprises a central substantially circular portiondisposed about the upwardly extending boss ofthe traveling head and has two arms extending angularly therefrom, the one'arm 147 being connected to the ball connecting rod and the other. arm 148 being pro vided with a ratchet pawl at its end. It is clamped upon the traveling head by a ring 145 and bolts 146.

The ratchet pawl mechanism comprises a cylindrical rod pivotally journaled in a vertical aperture in' the end of the arm 148 and has upon rotated "through a sufficient numberapertures and its upper end a lever 149. the rod has afilxed thereto a The lower end of ratchet pawl 153.

1 A helical spring 150 is adjustably secured to the end of the lever 149 and to a lug 151 on the arm 148, by an adjusting screw 152, the lug .151 being integral. with the arm 148 and holding the pawl 153 in spring pressed engagement with the revolving ratchet plate.

A ratchet stop lever bracket is attached to the traveling head intermediate a pair of guides 94 and comprises a' bracket 111 attached to the traveling head by bolts 112. The lower part of the bracket forms an apertured housing 114 strengthened and supported by a web 113 in which a ratchet stop spacing pin 116 is radially disposed relative to the traveling head and pressed by a spring 117 into notches in the revolving ratchet plate. An operating lever 118 for the pin 116 is attached pivotally to the upper part of the bracket and has at its upper end an oblique operating face 119. A; lower reduced end 120 projects into a notch 121 in the ratchet stop pin.

- The ratchet stop lever mechanism provides a means of holding the revolving arbor plate in a fixed and immovable position, while a tube is being operated upon, and is operated by a ratchet stop trip mechanism, Figs. 2 and 13, which comprises a bracket 122 bolted to the top bolt ring 46 by bolts 122'. A ratchet stop trip bracket 124 is secured to the bracket 112 on the top bolt ring by bolts 123, and may be raised and lowered relative to the top bolt ring by loosening the bolts 123 and turning the adjusting screw 125, the brackets being provided with elongated holes 126 through which the bolts 123 pass. The bracket extends downwardly and has at its end a yoke 127 in which the ratchet stop trip is pivotally held.

The trip 128, is best shown in Fig. 13, comprising an elongated plate, one end of which is provided with an oblique abutting face 165. It is pivoted and spaced from the face 165 leaving arelatively larger portion extending outward and adapted to act as a weight to keep the plate in a normally horizontal position, pivoted movement of the trip 128 being limited by a wall 129 which extends through the channel of the yoke in which the stop trip is journalled, and slants upwardly substantially as shown at 130, Fig. 13, which allows the trip, to rotate to. an oblique position relative to the horizontal when pressure is exerted downward on the operating end. The upper portion of the bracket is provided with a channel. 131, which allows the lever 118 to pass therein, as later described.

In describing the operation of my device, let it be assumed that the traveling head is at the end of its upward position of travel, this position having been controlled by the operator. Suitable stops 155 are provided to limit the upward movement which comprises threaded rods disposed through vertical apertures in the top bolt ring 46, Fig. 2, and having a portion 156 projecting downward, which contacts with the surface of the traveling head.

' The cylindrical tube to be pressed is tele-" scoped upon the mandrel between the jaws 83 of the arbor. The jaws then clamp the tube secure- 1yv upon the mandrel by turning the operating handle '76 of the wrench, the hexagonal portion of the rotatable sleeve 73. The elliptical surface 77 of the sleeve engages the ends of the screws 81, exerting a camming action upon the same, forcing the upwhich is disposed upon per lever ends 79 outwardly, which being pivoted at 71, forces the short gripping arms 72 with the jaws 83 into contact with the outer surface of the tube. The space between the arbor jaws and the mandrel may be adjusted by means of lock nut 82 and the screw 81.

A fluid under pressure, such as oil, is introduced into the chamber 59 and flows through the conduit 60 into the upper portion of the cylinder at 61, exerting'pressure upon the upper face of the piston 48 and forcing the piston and rod with the traveling head attached thereto downward, the traveling head guides reciprocating upon the guide bolts 45. The end of the tube enters the funnel bushing 33 wherein oil is flowing from the oil line 157, passes through the funnel bushing and through the tube lock plug and into the die disposed within the die bushing, which in the first tube is at the upper end thereof as previously set forth. The end of the tube is engaged by the restricted portion 38 of the die and reduced in diameter and increased in wall thickness as it passes through.

During the first operation, the machine has but one tube held by one of the arbors, which is reduced in diameter for a greater portion of its length. The reciprocation of the traveling head towards the base 3 being limited by downward stop bolts 158.

The tube, passing through the die, and being reduced in diameter and increased in wall thickness in that portion which passes through the die, is guided by the bushings in the lower portion of the die tube which prevent warping thereof.

As the traveling head approaches the bed ring 3, the end of the angle ball arm 136 carrying the roller is rotated to a position, wherein it is adapted to operate the revolving ratchet plate, by contacting with the lower ratchet reverse arm 166, Figs. 4 and 18, which comprises a plate at-- tached to the bed ring by bolts 167, its height relative to the bed ring being adjustable by means of the elongated slots 168 therein. The ratchet pawl abuts the tooth 109. 120

The fluid underpressure is then diverted from the chamber 59, which connects with the upper portion of the cylinder into the chamber 58 which connects with the cylinder below the piston. The pressure of the oil below the piston 125 forces the pistonand rod upward raising the traveling head which withdraws the tube from the die tube and bushings.

When the tube is Withdrawn fromcontact with the die tube and is free of the bed ring 130 and appurtenances, the roller in the angle ball arm contacts with the reverse bar 154. The re verse bar is securedto the top bolt head 46 by a bracket 159, and comprises a rectangular plate and has at its lower end an outwardly extending flange 160 provided with a pair of adjusting screws 161. A shoe 162 is clamped -to the lower part of the bar by bolts 163,-the shoe being provided with transverse slots 164 to allow the same to be adjusted upon the bar by means of the screws 161.

The revolving ratchet plate, which is locked against revolving movement by the ratchet stop pin 116 in one of the notches 108, is released by the lever 118 contacting with the face 165 of the lever 128 which rotates the lever and slides the pin 116 outward against the pressure'of the spring 117 removing the pin from locking engagement with the notches.

The roller of the lever 136 contacts with the The revolving ratchet plate I 1-2--3, eighteen drawin shoe 162 on'the bar 164 which rotates the arm 136 in a counter-clockwise direction, Fig. 2. This imparts movement to the ratchet reverse arm 144, Fig. 3, by means of the ball connecting rod 5 142 and rotates the ratchet reverse arm with its accompanying pawl and lever in a clockwise direction. The pawl 153 which is in engagement with the stop 109 communicates rotational movement to the revolving ratchet plate which revolves o in a clockwise direction. The adjustment of the shoe 162 determines the distance which the revolving ratchet plate moves,which as before described, is suflicient to align the tube, which is being drawn, with the next preceding die tube. 107 carries with it the revolving arbor plate 102 by means of the keys and keyways before described.

The traveling head is now in at the upper end of its travel and another tube is placed upon the next succeeding mandrel, which has moved into the place of the arbor and mandrel preceding it, I and secured thereto in the same manner as the first tube. The fluid pressure is again diverted to the chamber 59, and the traveling head reciprocates downward. The operation is the same as before described, except that during this operation the tube first operated upon will now be inserted in the second die tube, wherein the die is located in the die bushing spaced from the top by one bushing and the two tubes will be reduced, the last tube being reduced in a manner the same as the first tube, and the first tube will he reducedto a smaller diameter for a shorter portion of its length due to the fact that the die in the die bushing in the second tube is positioned lower in the tube.

When the operation is completed, and the two tubes withdrawn from the die tubes in a manner similar to the preceding operation, the revolving 40 arbor plate again rotates as previously described and another tube is attached to a third arbor and mandrel and the operation again resumed. During thisoperation, the first tube will be reduced by the die in the third die bushing in the third die tube spaced still lower in the tube, such die and tube being shown in Fig. '7. The step by step operation as discussed is continued until the machine has thereon 18 tubes and upon the eighteenth operation, the tube enters the die tube having the die in the lower end of the die tube and reduces the end of the tube. The traveling head has now revolved one complete turn and the tubes now align with the first die tube. The formed tube is removed from the mandrel and arbor and a new tube is secured thereon, and the operation is continued; as each tube is completed, it is replaced by a new tube to be operated upon. A tube being completed at each cycle of the machine? As above described, I have provided a reciprocating machine for progressively reforming tubes, which comprises-a pair of'relatively reciprocable supports herein illustrated at 102, and 1-2-3, which are relatively reciprocable towards and from each other, and have herein provided in ,,.,spirally disposed formation, on the support dies having die openings of successively graduated sizes and have provided for the relatively reciprocable support 102, gripping means herein illustated as comprising the jaws 84 carried by the mandrel 65, all of which depend from the annular support 102. x

The tubes, such as 85, to be reformed, may then be projected into the axially aligned bores of the bushings 5 contained within each of the tubes 25,

first operated upon .ijoregoing description,

. I 5 which support the dies. The supports being relatively' reciprocated, all of the tubes to be reformed will simultaneously be projected through the spirally arranged dies, such as that shown at 38, Fig. 7, These dies being held in their supports at different distances from the annular head 102, the difierent tubes 85 will have different lengths of their lower portions reduced in diameter.

' After each reciprocation through the dies, the tubes are withdrawn by a relative recession of the supports 102, and 1-'-2.--3, after which by the mechanism illustrated in Fig. 3, the support 102 is rotated through an arc corresponding to the space between the tubes 25, and the supports are again then reciprocated toward each [other and withdrawn.

This process continues in consecutive steps, progressively, until each of the tubes is progressively reduced from its original form, which may be cylindrical, to a form corresponding to that of the tube of Fig. 11, wherein successive lengths of the tube, proceeding from the larger end, are of successively diminished diameters and successively increased wall thickness, resulting from' successive projections of successively shorter portions of the tubes through the successive dies disposed successively lower and lower in their respective tubes 25 and having successively smaller die openings.

It follows from the above that the lower end of the tube will be successively reduced in diameter eighteen times, the next adjoining section seventeen times, and. so forth until the uppermost reduced section is reached, which will have been processed only a first, singletime; and that the successively reduced sections will be ,of successively thicker wall.

. The operator operating the machine will, after each recessional reciprocatory movement of the rotatable tube support 102, withdraw a completely processed tube, such as illustrated in Fig. 11, and supply for charging the machine an'entirely unprocessed tube in its place. This charging operation will be accomplished while the 120 completely processed tube is held by the arbor in a rotative position at which there is no bushing and die holding tube 25, and thus the tube may be easily laterally withdrawn after a releasing operation of the arbor clutch jaws effected by rotation of'the camming element '73 by manual manipulation of the handle '76.

The above process is very well adapted I01 the reforming of thin-walled steel tubes of a considerable hardness, such as tubes of steel having 130 qualities of temper adapted to give best results -when the completed article is used for golf club shafts, as illustrated.

The completed product, as best shown in Fig. '11, comprises a tube having a series of progressively reduced cylindrical portions, substantially as shown, and, as will.be understood from the of successively thicker wall.

Although I have described the tube as having eighteen progressively reduced steps, I do not desire to limit myself thereby as I may omit sonze of the die tubes, thus reducing the number i steps, if so desired, or I may make tubes having a greater number of steps by increasing the num- 5 specific embodiments, I am aware that numerous and extensive departures may be made from the embodiment herein illustrated and described. but 159 without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim? 1. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively stepped tube comprising *successively reduced diameter by successive pushing efforts imparted to the trailing end of the tube.

2. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively stepped tube comprising repeatedly pushing the tube through successive die openings relatively traversing a, portion of the tube length, and then withdrawing the tube, each die opening being of smaller diameter than the preceding die opening and the portion of the tube length forced through each die opening being shorter than that pushed through the preceding die opening, at least some of the pushing operations being effected by pressure exerted toward the dies against the trailing end portion of the tube.

3. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively stepped tube having stepped sections of varying length comprising repeatedly forcing a-tube through successive die openings over a portion of the tube length, and withdrawing the tube, each die opening being of smaller diameterthan the preceding die opening and the portion of the tube length forced through each die opening being shorter than that forced through the preceding die opening, each tube forcing operation being effected by a pushing cftrailing end of the tube in the direction of the cooperative die opening.

5. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively stepped tube comprising successively forcing successively shorter mediate portion of 6. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively steppedtube comprising repeatedly forcing the tube through successive die openings over a portion of the tube length, and then withdrawing the tube, and during the forcing and drawing operation supporting the inner wall of the tube with a mandrel, each die openby wall thickening compressive stress exerted bedie opening tweenthe larger end of the tube and the die open- 7. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively stepped tube, the stepped sections being of varying length comprising repeatedly forcing the tube through successive die openings over a portion of the tube length and withdrawing'the tube, and during the foreing and drawing operation supporting the inner.

9. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively stepped tube, the stepped sections being of variable length, comprising repeatedly pushing sive die openings over a portion of the tube length plication of force to its trailing end act ing in the direction of and eifecting'movement of the tube, and successively withdrawing the tube, and during at least the first few of said forcing operations supporting the inner'wall by a manthe tube length forced through each die opening being shorter than that forced through the preceding die opening, and the die openings effecting inwardly radial compression of the tube wall to effect a thickening of the wall thereof.

10. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively stepped tube comprising successively forcing sucessively drawing operation supporting the inner wall of the tube with a mandrel.

11. The method of drawing a tube to produce therefrom a progressively stepped tube comprising repeatedly pushing portion of the tube length forced through each being shorter than that pushed through the preceding die opening, at least some of the pushing the tube through succes- 12. The method of drawing a tube to produce plurality of die diameter by successive pushing efforts imparted to the trailing end of the tube, the die opening effecting inward ste'pped tube comessors a 7 radial compression of the tube wall to effect a portion of the tube length forced through each thickening of the wall thereof. die opening being shorter than that pushed 13. The method of drawing a tube to produce through the preceding die opening, at least some therefrom a progressively stepped tube comprisof the pushing operations being effected by presing repeatedly pushing the tube through sucsure exerted toward the dies against the trailing cessive die openings relatively traversing a porend portion of the tube, the die opening effectameter than the preceding die opening andthe 6 ROBERT H. COWDERY tion of the tube length, and then withdrawing ing inward radial compression of the tube wall to the tube, each die opening being of smaller dieffect a thickening of the wall thereof.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5935017 *Jun 28, 1996Aug 10, 1999Cobra Golf IncorporatedGolf club shaft
US6117021 *Dec 24, 1997Sep 12, 2000Cobra Golf, IncorporatedGolf club shaft
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/356, 473/323
International ClassificationB21C1/16, B21C1/26
Cooperative ClassificationB21C1/26
European ClassificationB21C1/26