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Publication numberUS1965973 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1934
Filing dateJul 11, 1933
Priority dateJul 11, 1933
Publication numberUS 1965973 A, US 1965973A, US-A-1965973, US1965973 A, US1965973A
InventorsElwood Brown Frank
Original AssigneeElwood Brown Frank
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Broom hanger
US 1965973 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 1o, 1934. F E BROWN 1,965,973

BRooM HANGER Filed July 11, 1933 Patented July 10, 1934 BROOM HANGER Frank Elwood Brown, New Haven, Conn.

Application July 11, l1933, Serial No. 679,839

5 Claims.

My invention relates 'to improvements in a broom hanger which may be attached to the wall of a room by screws or other means.

The invention consists of a simple device for holding a. broom handle by friction between two rollers spaced a short distance apart.

The device largely consists of a wooden block upon the face of which are secured two similar knobs or rollers held on corresponding pivots, The location of each .pivot upon its corresponding roller is such as to give an oscillating' or eccentric motion to its roller when rotated. The rotation of the rollersV is fixed within certain limits by means of a stop pin driven into and projecting vfrom the back of each roller. Each stop pin projects into a corresponding stop hole extending through the wooden block.

An elongated slot in the back, extending only part way through the thickness of the block, 2'() and occupying all of the area between the stop holes ris one of the mai-n features of the invention as it allows a spring to be fastened Ato and move freely between the two said stop pins for the purpose of holding the rollers as near to their closed or normal position as possible, thereby increasing the friction o-n a broom handle inserted between the rollers. The mechanism within the block may be covered on the back by a strong paper sticker, preferably a printed label.

With these and other advantages, the invention is simple and easily manufactured at small cost and occupies little space as the wooden block on which the rollers are fastened, may be secured to the wall of a room in any convenient location.

In the drawing, similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

Figure 1 is an oblique projection view of the invention showing how the handle of a. broom is held by friction between the rollers.

Figure 2 is an elevation of the face with a section of front remo-ved showing the different parts when in use.

Figure 3 is an elevation of the face showing how the space between the rollers may be varied and how ythe stop holes are always covered on the face by the rollers within the limits of their range.

Figure 4 is a side or end elevation showing a bevelled edge of a roller and the position of the pivot pin and screw holes for fastening the wooden block to the wall.

Figure 5 is an elevation of the back of the wooden block showing the stop holes through said wooden block and the slot between the stop holes for 'allowing 'the spring attached to the stop pins to be moved lup or down.

Figure 6 is a vertical'secti'on 'on section line 1'3-13 of Figure 5 showing the normal position of 'a stop pin, the slot in which the spring is moved and a stop hole through the wooden block.

Figure 7 is a horizontal section on section line '14-14 of Figure 5 showing the slot and the spring attached to the stop `pins. l Y Referring more particularly to the preferred 'form of the invention as shown in Figures 2, 5, and 7, 1 represents the wooden block attached to the wall b`y means 'of screws 2 passing through screw holes 3 through the block ofwood 1. 1

Two corresponding rollers 4 'are fastened to the wooden block l as shown in Figures 3 'and 5 by means of corresponding nails 5 passing through cor-responding holes 1l through the wooden block'. l, and then said nails are driven into each wooden Vroller 4 near its circumference at a level slight- *is ly below the centers of the rollers 4nwhen in normal position. Each of these nails 5 serve as a pivot for rotating its respective roller as 'each nail rotates with its respective roller, each h'ole 11 through the block serving as a bearing for its pivot.

Referring to Figures 5 and 7, a slot 6 extending part way into the back of the wooden block 1 covers the area between two holes 7. The holes 7, however, pass entirely through the block of wood 1 so that each of two corresponding stop pins 8 driven into its corresponding roller 4 may move within the limits of its corresponding hole '7. The rollers 4 to which their corresponding stop pins 8 are fastened, are rotated with their pivots 5 when the handle of a broom or other utensil is forced within the space 9 between the rollers 4, thereby raising the rollers 4 a suflicient distance to allow the broom handle or other utensil to be inserted.

Each opposite end of a spring 10 as shown in Figure 7 is fastened to a corresponding stop pin 8. When the rollers 4 are forced apart, or drawn nearer together, the spring 10 is extended or contracted and moves upward or downward within the slot 6 correspondingly. Each roller 4 may revolve with its respective pivot 5 Vapproximately fifty degrees, this being the limit of its oscillation as governed by its attached stop pin 8 which moves within the confines of its respective stop hole 7.

The fixed limit in closing the rollers to normal position provides the proper space for placing a broom handle before it is pushed in between the bevelled edges of the rollers. The fixed limit to the spread of rollers is for the purposel of preventing stretching the spring too far, and also to prevent the rollers from rotating beyondv the stop holes and thus uncovering said stop holes to exposure.

The bearing holes 11 are countersunk in the block 1 a suiicient depth so that the head of each pivot nail 5 will easily rotate below the surface of the block when the device is fastened to the wall and a broom handle is inserted in the space 9 between the rollers 4. When the rollers 4 are pushed apart, the spring 10 stretches and moves upward within the slot 6 because the holes 7 allow their respective stop pins 8 to move Within certain limits. When the rollers 4 are released, the spring 10 returns the rollers 4 to their normal position and closes the space 9 between said rollers 4 to its smallest size, as the stop pins 8 are now brought against the sides of the stop holes 7 respectively. A special facing 12 may be placed around the circumference of each roller 4 to, increase the friction against a broom handle when held between the rollers.

In use the hanger operates in the following manner: The handle of a broom or mop is pushed against the bevelled edges of the pair of rollers 4 with a slight lifting motion at the same time releasing hold of theV handle.V This action causes the rollers 4 to spread to the required distance to admit the handle between them. The weight of the broom assisted by the tension of the spring l0 between the rollers 4 produces sufficient friction to hold the broom handle between the rollers 4 with an eccentric or cam action grip. The greater the downward pull of the handle, the greater the friction grip on the rollers because the rollers 4 are closed more tightly.

I do not limit myself to the material of which the device is made; neither do I limit myself to the kind of spring used, or the mode of fastening the rollers to their block as all these may be varied and are within the spirit of the claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a hanger for brooms, a wooden block having holes extending therethrough, two rollers each fastened to said block over a corresponding hole', a stop pin fastened to each of the rollers and extending into the holes in the block, and a spring having the ends thereof attached to said stop pins.

2. In a hanger for brooms, a Wooden block having holes extending therethrough, two rollers each fastened to said block over a corresponding hole, a stop pin fastened to each of the rollers and extending into the holes in the block, and a spring having the ends thereof attached= to said stop pins and movable within a slot in the said block.

3. In a hanger for brooms, a Wooden block having holes extending therethrough, two rollers each eccentrically fastened to said block over a corresponding hole, a stop pin fastened to each of the rollers and extending into the holes in the block, and a spring having the ends thereof attached to said stop pins and movable within an elongated slot extending part way into the rear of the said wooden block, said slot extending between the said stop holes an-d having a Width approximately equal to the diameter of each stophole throughout the length of said slot.

4. In a hanger for brooms, a wooden block hav- .100 ing holes extending therethrough, two rollers each fastened to said block over a corresponding hole by a pivot passing through a bearing hole in the wooden block and into its corresponding roller near its circumference, the head of each pivot positioned to rotate in a counter sunk hole in the wooden block, and a stop pin fastened to each of the rollers and extending into holes in the block, and a spring having the ends thereof attached to said stop pins and movable in a slot within the wooden block.

5. In a hanger for brooms, a block having holes extending therethrough, two rollers with their outer edges bevelled each fastened to said block over a corresponding hole, a stop pin fastened to each of the rollers and extending into the holes in the block, and a spring having the ends thereof attached to said stop pins and movable in a slot located in the block.

FRANK ELWOOD BROWN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5269328 *Apr 15, 1992Dec 14, 1993Super Gadget Ashtray Ltd.Safety cigarette holder
US5992811 *Feb 23, 1998Nov 30, 1999Mcferren; Steven A.Clamp for securing devices
US7032870 *Aug 2, 2001Apr 25, 2006Ergotron, Inc.Methods and apparatus for generating force and torque
US7506853Nov 3, 2004Mar 24, 2009Ergotron, Inc.Methods and apparatus for generating force and torque
US8228668Jul 26, 2007Jul 24, 2012Ergotron, Inc.Balanced moment lift system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/113, 248/316.3, 248/316.1
International ClassificationA47L13/512, A47L13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/512
European ClassificationA47L13/512