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Publication numberUS1967064 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1934
Filing dateDec 10, 1931
Priority dateDec 10, 1931
Publication numberUS 1967064 A, US 1967064A, US-A-1967064, US1967064 A, US1967064A
InventorsFridolin Polzer, Peterson Roy E
Original AssigneeHotchkiss Co E H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anvil for stapling machines
US 1967064 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.My 17, 1934. F. POLZER El AL ANVIL FOR STAPLING MACHINES Filed Dec. 10, 1951 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIII/1111M ATTORNEYS;

Patented July 17, 1934 1,967,064 ANVIL son sen-aim; Mslcnnvns Fridolin lc-lzer, South NorWalk, and Roy E. leterson; East Nerwa-lli, cam, assignors to The E. H. Hotchkiss Company, Norwalk, Conn, a ccrpcrationof Connecticut Application December 10, 1931, Serial No. 580,122

6 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in stapling machines, and has particular relation to an anvil mechanism for such machines.

An object of the invention is to provide a stapling machine including a movable anvil and means for causing the anvil to deliver a hammerlike blow to the end portions of adriven staple whereby to clinch and flatten said end portions against the object being stapled.

Another object is to provide a reliable and efficient means for the purpose stated and which means is automatic in itsoperation, being prepared for operation by the operation of the usual plunger in its staple driving stroke, and which includes but a relatively few and simple parts whereby the device is not likely to get out of order and may be manufactured at a comparatively low cost.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein a satisfactory embodiment of the invention is shown. However, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the'precise details disclose-d but includes all such'varlations and modifications as fall within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims to which claims reference should be had for a definition of the invention.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a view partly in section andpartly in side elevation with parts broken away to better illustrate details of construction;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view on an'enlarged scale through the forward portion of the machine showing the relative lccation' of parts during the operation of driving a staple;

Fig. 3 is a detail sectionalview taken at right angles to Fig. 2 and showingthe relative location of parts at the completion of a stapling operation;

Fig. 4 is aview somewhat similar to Fig. 3 but showing therelative lo'cation'of parts during the operation of driving a staple; and

Figure 5 is a detail sectional'view' takensubstantially along the line 5-'5 of-Fig. 1.

in the co-pending application Serial No. 580,123 filed December th, 1231, ofFridolin Polzer the means of the present invention is shown and described in connection with other features of a stapling machine and is broadly claimed.

Referring in detail to the drawing the improved anvil for stapling machines as herein disclosed is applied to a machine including a base 6 on which is mounted an anvil 7 comprising parts 8 and 9 pivotally mounted as by pins 10. The anvil is arranged adjacent the front portion of the base and toward its rear end the base carries a block 11 to which is rigidly secured an upwardly and forwardly curving arm 12, the arm being adapted at its lower end to straddle the block 11 or be disposed over the same and being secured to the block as by bolts or rivets 13 passing through the lower portion of the arm and the block. 7 g I V V A housing 14 including a longitudinal substantially horizontally arranged portion 15 and a front or head portion 16 is disposed above the base 6 and toward the rear end of its portion 15 is partiall-y received in a notch in the upper surface of the block 11 and is pivotally mounted on the block as by a pin or bar 1'7. Within the longitudinal portion 15 of the housing there is arranged a guide bar 18 adapted to have a staple strip 19 disposed thereon and fed therealong by any suitable follower means. I M

v The follower meanshere disclosed includes a follower head 20- straddling the guide bar 18 in the rear of the staple strip and urged along the guide bar as by a coil spring 21 arranged on a rod 22- extending through a channel 28 in the upper surface of the guide bar. A clip 24 surrounding the bar 22 and carried by the head 20 is adapted to have one end of the spring 21 bear against it whereby the follower head is urged forwardly along the guide bar by the spring. On its rear end or free end the rod 22 is provided with a finger piece or head 25 and also carries a pin 26 adapted tobe engaged in a bayonet slot 2'7 in the rear portion of the housing whereby to secure the follower on the guide bar.

The head 16 of the housing 14 is hollow toreceive avertically reciprocable member or plunger carrier 28 to the forward face of which is secured a plunger 29 operable in a raceway 30 in the head, to drive staples. Arranged within the head 16 and below the member 28 is a coil spring 31 adapted to resist movement of the member into the head in the operation of the member to drive a'staple and adapted to act to move the member upwardly'to its normal position after each staple driving operation. Of course, the plunger 29 is carried with the member 28 and it will be under stood that theplunger is operated downwardly through the raceway 30 to cut the foremost staple from the strip 19 and drive said staple through the raceway and through the object to be stapled and against the anvil 7.

At its upper end the member or plunger carrier 28 is provided with a head-like portion 32 having an elongated slot 33 therein and through which slot extends a pin 34 adapted to connect the portion 32 and thus the plunger carrier 28 with a hand member or piece 35 pivotally connected at its rear end as by the pivot 36 with the forward end portion of the upwardly and forwardly curved arm 12 previously referred to. A coil spring 37, preferably arranged within the arm 12, has one of its ends anchored to said arm as at 38, and has its other end connected with the hand piece or lever 35 as at 39 in eccentric relation to the pivot 36. It will therefore be apparent that the spring 37 normally acts to maintain the handle or piece 35 in the elevated or normal position in which it is shown in Fig. 1.

The operation of the stapling machine as is thus far described will it is believed be apparent. The follower mechanism constantly urges the staple strip along the guide bar in the direction of the raceway 30 whereby the staples of the strip are fed one at a time to the raceway. The papers or other material P to be stapled are disposed on the anvil portion of the base and the handle 35 is then operated downwardly about its pivot 36 to move the plunger 29 downwardly through the raceway. During this movement the plunger functions to cut the first staple from the strip and drive said staple through-the raceway and the object to be stapled and against the anvil. The springs 31 and 3'7 act to return the parts to normal position.

As stated above the parts 8 and 9 of the anvil are pivotally mounted on the pins 16 and arranged below these parts is one arm 46 of a lever 41 pivoted to the base as at 42 and having a depending arm or portion 43. Slidably mounted in spaced bearings 44 and 45 carried by the base 6 at its underside is a rod 46 the forward end of which includes a head or portion 47 adapted as will later appear, to, at the proper time, engage the depending arm 43 of the lever 41 and rock said lever about its pivot 42. Surrounding the rod 46 and arranged between the bearing 44 and a collar 48 on the rod is a coil spring 49, the function of which will later be described.

A lever 50 is pivoted intermediate its ends as by the pivot pin 17 before referred to and this lever extends through a relatively wide slot 51 in the block 11 to one side of the housing 15 and through a similar slot in the upper wall of the base 6. At its lower end the lever 50 is pivotally connected with the rear or inner end of the rod 46 as by means of a pin 52 carried by the rod and passing through an elongated slot 53 in the lower end portion of the lever. The upper end of the lever is pivotally connected as at 54 with the rear end of a forwardly extending bar 55 arranged above the elongated portion 15 of the housing 14.

The head 16 on the forward end of the elongated portion 15 of the housing includes rearwardly extending spaced portions 56 the rear portions 57 of which are off-set toward one another, but spaced apart to provide a relatively deep pocket 58 the limits of which are defined at one side by the shoulders 59. A bell-crank lever 60 is pivotally mounted between the portions 57 as on a pin 61 and to the arm 62 of this bell-crank lever there is pivotally connected the forward end of the bar 55, the pivot being indicated at 63. In the normal position of the parts as shown in Fig. 1 the arm 64 of the bell-crank lever projects slightly beyond the shoulders 59 and into the pocket 58.

Secured to the rear side of the head 32 of the plunger carrying member 28 is an upiight 65, the lower end portion of which is adapted to be reciprocated in the pocket 58 as the plunger 29 is r ciprocated in the driving of a staple. A dog or pawl 66 pivoted to this upright 65 in spaced relation to the lower end thereof and interposed between the lower or free end of said dog or pawl and the lower end of the upright is a coil spring 67, the purpose of which is to normally maintain the free end of the pawl against the shoulders 59 in a position spanning the space between the shoulders.

When the handle 35 is depressed to operate the plunger 29 and drive a staple, the upright 65 and the pawl 66 are of course carried downwardly into the pocket 58 as the plunger moves downwardly in the raceway 30. As the parts move downwardly the outer or free end of the pawl riding against the shoulders 59 engages the end of the arm 64 of the bell-crank lever and carries this end downwardly resulting in the bell-crank lever being rocked about its pivot 61 in a manner to cause its arm 62 to move rearwardly. Such movement of the bell-crank lever results in the bar 55 being reciprocated rearwardly whereby the lever 50 is rocked on its pivot 17 to throw its lower end forwardly and thereby slide the rod forwardly in a manner to compress the spring 49 and carry the head or portion 47 of the rod away from the depending arm 43 of the lever 41.

This movement of the head or portion 47 away from the arm 43 of lever 41 will, of course, permit the lever to drop downwardly about its pivot in a manner to carry its arm 40 away from the anvil parts 8 and 9 and these parts may then either gravitate to the positions in which they are shown in Fig. 4 or the parts may be moved to such positions by the end portions of a staple. Therefore it will be understood that during the operation of driving a staple the parts 8 and 9 of the anvil either gravitate from the position in which they are best shown in Fig. 3 to that in which they are best shown in Fig. 4, or are moved into the position shown in Fig. 4 by the end portions of a staple.

It will, therefore, be understood that the anvil parts offer no appreciable resistance to the down ward movement of the legs of a staple after said legs have passed through the object or objects being stapled. There is, therefore, no tendency of the legs of the staple to buckle due to the end portions of said legs coming into engagement with a fixed or rigid anvil.

As the plunger 29 reaches the end of its stroke, the bell-crank lever 60 has moved into such a position that the end of its arm 64 has moved into a position between the portions 57 of the head. and beyond the shoulders 59 and as the plunger completes its movement the pawl 66 is carried below this arm of the bell crank and the compressed spring 49 is released to return the parts connected with it to their normal positions. When the parts are released as just described, the spring 49 which was compressed during forward movement of the rod 46 expands and throws the rod rearwardly causing the head or portion 4'7 of the rod to violently strike the depending arm 43 of the lever 41 and throw said lever about its pivot to cause its arm 40 to throw the parts 8 and 9 of the anvil upwardly and have them deliver a sharp or hammer-like blow to the end portions of the legs of the staple.

From the foregoing it will be appreciated that this hammering of the end portions of the legs of the driven staple does not take place until after the plunger has driven the staple through the object being stapled. This hammering results in the staple having its end portionsor the end portions of its legs, clinched against the object being stapled and moreover results in said end portions of the legs being flattened against the object. In the operation of the device the handle 35 will, of course, be held down to m'aintain the plunger in engagement with the cross or connecting bar of the driven staple until after the parts of the anvil have delivered their hammer-like blow.

In the usual arrangements wherein a stationary anvil having two concave depressions is employed the ends of the legs of the staples are turned over but are not flattened against the object stapled. With the present arrangement these ends are given a sharp hammer-like blow and are absolutely flattened against the object through which the staple has been driven.

The movement of the rod 46 rearwardly on the expansion of the spring 49 as above described results in the lever 50 being rocked about its pivot 1'? in a manner to throw the bar forwardly and return the bell-crank lever to its normal position. As the springs 31 and 3'7 act to return the plunger 29 and handle 35 and associated parts to normal position the upright and pawl 66 are of course carried upwardly and the pawl may pass the now projecting end of the arm 64 of the bell-crank since owing to its pivotal mounting and the spring 67 the pawl may collapse or move against the upright in one direction.

Having thus set forth the nature of our invention, what we claim is:

1. In a stapling machine, a base, an anvil carried by the base, a housing having a raceway therein above the anvil, means for feeding staples to the raceway, a plunger operable in the raceway to drive the staples, said anvil comprising a pair of parts pivotally mounted for movement toward and from the end portions of the legs of the staple being driven, means operated to store energy during the staple driving movement of the plunger, means whereby said stored energy is released on completion of the staple driving movement of the plunger, and a pivoted lever engaging both of said anvil parts and operated by said released energy for causing the anvil to deliver a hammer-like blow to the end portions of the driven staple to clinch said end portions against the object being stapled.

2. In a stapling machine, a base, an anvil carried by the base, a housing having a raceway therein above the anvil, means for feeding staples to the raceway, a plunger operable in the raceway to drive the staples, said anvil mounted for movement toward and from the end portions of the legs of a staple being driven, a lever pivoted on the base and having a portion engaging the underside of the anvil, a rod slidably mounted on the base, said rod slidably with respect to the lever and having a portion to engage the lever and rock it on its pivot as the rod approaches the limit of its movement in one direction, a coil spring on the rod, means whereby as the plunger is operated to drive a staple the rod is moved to compress the spring, and a trip mechanism whereby the rod is released as the plunger completes its driving movement whereby the spring may expand and move the rod in a direction to cause the said portion thereof to engage the lever and rock the same in a direction to force the anvil against the end portions of the legs of the staple to flatten said portions against the object being stapled. r

3. In a'stapling machine, an elongated base, an anvil carried by the base adjacent one of its ends, a housing having a raceway therein above the anvil, means for feeding staples to the raceway, a plunger operable in the raceway to drive the staples, said anvil mounted for movement toward and from the end portions of the legs of a staple being driven, means for causing the anvil to deliver a hammer-like blow to the said end portions of the legs of the staple after the same has been driven, said means including a slidable rod at the under side of said base and operable in one direction to cause said anvil to deliver said hammer like blow, a spring at the under side of said base to operate said rod in said direction, means to compress said spring during the movement of the plunger in driving a staple, and automatic means to release the spring to have it operate said rod in said direction on the completion of the staple driving movement of the plunger.

4. In a stapling machine, a base, an anvil carried by the base, a housing having a raceway therein above the anvil, means for feeding staples to the raceway, a plunger operable in the raceway to drive the staples, said anvil comprising a pair of pivotally mounted parts adapted to have pivotal movement toward and from the end portions of the legs of a staple being driven, a lever pivoted on the base and having a portion engaging the underside of each of said anvil parts, a rod mounted on the base, said rod slidable with respect to the lever and having a portion to engage the lever and rock it on its pivot as the rod approaches the limit of its movement in one direction, a coil spring on the rod, means whereby as the plunger is operated to drive a staple the rod is moved to compress the spring, and a trip mechanism whereby the rod is released as the plunger completes its driving movement whereby the spring may expand and move the rod in a direction to cause the said portion thereof to engage the lever and rock the same to force the anvil parts against the end portions of the legs of the staple to flatten said portions against the object being stapled.

5. In a stapling machine, a base, an anvil movably mounted on the base, a head above the base, said head having a raceway, means for feeding staples to the raceway, a plunger operable in the raceway to drive the staples, said anvil mounted for movement toward and from the end portions of the legs of a staple being driven, a pivoted 130 lever having an end portion beneath and in engagement with the anvil, a slidably mounted rod having a normal position on the base, a spring associated with said rod, means whereby the rod is moved from normal position to store energy in 135 the spring as the plunger is moved to drive a staple, and means for releasing the rod as the plunger completes its driving stroke whereby the spring acts to return the rod to normal position, said rod including a means to engage and rock 140 the lever during movement of the rod to normal position whereby said lever will operate the anvil to have it deliver a hammer-like blow to the end portions of the staple and clinch said portions against the object being stapled on completion of the driving stroke of the plunger.

6. In a stapling machine, a base, an anvil on the base, a head above the base, said head having a raceway, means for supplying staples to the raceway, a plunger operable in the raceway to 159 drive the staples, said anvil mounted for movement toward and from the end portions of the legs of a staple being driven, a pivoted member having an end portion beneath and in engagement with the anvil, a slidably mounted rod having a normal position on the base, a spring on said rod, a lever pivoted intermediate its ends, said lever pivoted at one end to an end of the rod, a pivotally mounted bell crank lever, a link pivoted at one end to the other end of said lever and at its opposite end to an arm of the bell crank lever whereby rocking movement of the bell crank lever will cause sliding movement of said rod, and a pivotally mounted dog movable with the plunger and adapted on the driving stroke of the plunger to engage an arm of said bell crank lever and rock the same on its pivot to slide said rod forwardly and compress said spring, said bell crank lever adapted to move from under the dog on completion of the driving stroke of the plunger whereby the spring may act to shift the rod rearwardly to normal position, said rod including a means to engage and move the member during movement of the rod to normal position whereby said member will operate the anvil in a direction to have it deliver a hammerlike blow to the end portions of the staple and clinch said portions against the object being stapled.

FRIDOLIN POLZER.

ROY E. PETERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2470727 *Nov 30, 1945May 17, 1949Internat Staple And Machine CoAnvil clinching stapling machine
US2771609 *Jul 25, 1951Nov 27, 1956Hans KlopstockStapling appliances
US7681771Jun 16, 2006Mar 23, 2010Acco Brands Usa LlcStapler
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/134
International ClassificationB25C5/00, B25C5/02
Cooperative ClassificationB25C5/0242, B25C5/0207
European ClassificationB25C5/02D, B25C5/02F3