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Publication numberUS1967960 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1934
Filing dateJul 20, 1933
Priority dateJul 20, 1933
Publication numberUS 1967960 A, US 1967960A, US-A-1967960, US1967960 A, US1967960A
InventorsMcnemar Corry E
Original AssigneeMcnemar Corry E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Jar top remover
US 1967960 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 24, 1934.

C. E. M NEMAR JAR TOP REMOVER Filed July 20, 1933 Patented July 24, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE scum.

This invention relates to devices for removing the tops or caps from jars and particularly to a device for this purpose in the nature of a clamp adapted to be clamped upon the jar top so that ii the jar top may be turned oil of the jar or otherwise removed.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a top remover of this kind which has a very large range of adjustment so that it may be used to remove caps having a diameter of one-fourth of an inch up to four and one-half inches in diameter or larger.

A further object is to provide a device of this character in which one of the opposed jaws is loosely mounted so that it may conform readily to the jar cap and so that this clamp jaw is, therefore, self-adjusting.

Another object is to provide a device with interchangeable or replaceable jaws.

Another object is to provide a device of this character which may not only be used for detaching jar tops, including screw caps and vacuum or crimped covers, but may also be used for removing bottle caps and having means for re- 25 moving covers of tin containers that are pressed on such as the covers on cans for containing paint or syrup.

Other objects will appear in the course of the following description.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, wherein:-

Figure 1 is an under side plan view of my jar cap remover;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view, the pawl and the jaw being in elevation;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary section on the line 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Figure 1;

but showing a slight modification.

Referring to these figures, 10 designates one of the handles of my remover. This handle is U- shaped in cross section and is provided at its outer end with a head consisting of the laterally disposed plates 11 connected along the back of the handle. speaking, approximately rectangular in form. The opposed handle 12 is also provided with a head at its outer end, this head consisting of the two opposed plates 13. These plates are somewhat triangular in form and the two plates at the edge of the head are right angular y b nt and brought together as at 14 (see Figure 4) or these two plates may be joined by a block 15 Figure 5 is a section on the same line as -i--4 These opposed plates are, generallyinserted between the plates and held in place by the rivets 16 as shown in Figure 5. It is immaterial how these plates 13 are joined to each other. One of the plates 13 has an offset at 1'1 as shown in Figures 1 and 4 and the other plate 00 is formed with an outwardly projecting hook shaped portion 18 below which there is an inwardly extending flange 22 as shown in Figure 3. The head of the handle 10 is adapted to be inserted within the head-of the handle 12 in the 'manner 68 shown in Figure 1 and in the sectional views.

The heads are held together by a pivot bolt 19 which extends through the two pairs of plates 11 and 13 and constitutes a pivot upon which the handles may rock.

Extending through the head of the handle 10 and resting upon the closed bottom portion of this head is a bar 20 carrying at its outer end a clamping jaw and having one edge formed with ratchet teeth 21 as shown in Figure 2. The ex- 76 tremity of this bar is angularly bent at 23 as shown in Figure 3 and mounted upon the extremity of this bar is the jaw 24, the shank of which is angularly bent with relation to the jaw and lies flat against the bar 20 and is slotted at 25 to receive the angularly bent lug 23. A rivet 26 passes through the base or shank of the jaw 24 and through the end of the bar and detachably holds this jaw in place. The jaw is slightly curved,

as shown in Figure 2, and is formed with teeth to aid it in gripping the jar cap.

Coacting with the teeth 21 is a pawl 27 shown in Figure 2, this pawl having an ear 28 through which the pivot bolt 19 passes and carrying a rearwardly projecting tongue or finger 29. One edge face of the pawl is recessed at 30 and disposed in this recess is the bead 31 of a spring 32, which. spring bears against the closed edge portion of the handle 12 and urges the handle 12 away from the handle 10. This spring also urges the pawl 27 against the teeth 21. One half of the edge of this pawl is toothed as at 33 to correspond with the teeth 21. The remaining or forward portion of this edge face of the pawl is flat at 34 and bears against the crests of the teeth 31 and constitutes a guide.

The forward corner of the pawl is rounded at 35 so that when the pawl is raised, that is, shifted away from the teeth 21, this rounded part will constitute a guide for the bar 20 so that the bar may have a rectilinear movement.

The oilset portion 1'7 previously referred to is designed for the reception of the shank 36 of a jaw 37, the jaw being disposed at right angles to the shank and having a curved toothed face 38 which confronts the curvedtoothed face of the jaw 24. In order to hold the jaw loosely in place within the pocket formed by the offset 17,

I provide the shank of the jaw with an opening 39 and provide the outer wall of the ofiset portion 1'7 with an inwardly extending lug 40.

I provide the shank of the jaw with an opening 39 and provide the outer wall of the offset portion 17 with the inwardly extending lug 40 which projects into the opening 39. The lug acts to retain the jaw within the pocket but allows the jaw a certain freedom of movement so that the jaw is self -adjusting and will rock upon its curved inner face against the curved edge of the offset portion 17 and thus adjust itself to the jar top, allowing the face of the jaw to clamp the jar top firmly in any position.

Preferably the ratchet bar 20 is formed with a chisel-shaped edge 41, this chisel-shaped edge being used for removing covers of tin containers that are pressed on the body of the container, that is, covers of paint cans and syrup cans, the

'bar being withdrawn from the body of the device when so used.

The pawl 27 performs several functions. As will be seen, it engages the bar 20 for practically the entire length of the rectangular head of handle 10. The plane surface 34 on the edge of the pawl engages with the bar 20 when the teeth are locked. Thus the bar is held firmly in place in the trough of the U-shaped handle or head and thus the two jaws 24 and 38 are kept in absolute alinement. By providing a plurality of teeth upon the jaw, a safer lock is secured and wear on the teeth reduced.

When the pawl is in unlocked position, the heel 35 forms a guide to the bar 20 when it is moved in or out. It will be noted that the spring 32 is double-acting in that it keeps the handles apart and at the same time urges the pawl 27 into looking engagement with the teeth on bar 20. The angular lug 22 shown in Figure 3 forms a support to the bar 20 when the clamping jaw 11 is advanced by closing the two handles. The angular flanges 14 in Figure 4 or the block 15 in Figure 5 limits the opening movement of the handles. The closing movement is limited by the bottom of the U-shaped portion of handle 12 striking the edge 11 of handle 10.

In the use of this device, the jar is placed on the table and the jar carrying bar 20 is pulled outward to any desired extent, the jaws 37 and 24, of course, facing downward. The bar 20 is then disposed across the center of the cap or cover with the edge of the cap against the jaw 37 and resting upon the small lip or extension of the head 13 of handle 10, which projects from under the jaw 37 on handle 12. Then the extension bar is slid inward until the jaw thereon is firmly in contact with the cap. The handles are then grasped with the right hand and closed, thereby advancing the clamping jaw 38 until the cap is clamped tightly between the jaws. The jar is then grasped in the left hand and the cap is unscrewed, using just enough pressure on the handles to prevent slipping. As the clamping jaw on the handle 12 fits loosely between the two plates, it will adjust itself to the jar top and as the jaw advances, it will rock upon the curved edge of the offset 17, allowing the face of the jaw to clamp the jar top firmly at all positions.

To use the hook 18 to remove bottle tops, the extension, that is, the bar 20 is pushed almost in and the handles closed tightly, and with the device in one hand and the bottle in the other rest the edge of the jaw across the top of the bottle cap and with the hook 18 under the edge of the bottle cap, pry upward until the cap is removed. If the extension bar 20 is drawn further outward, the amount of extension being determined by the diameter of the jar cover, the same means may be used for prying up covers of jars or other glass containers, having vacuum covers that are crimpcd on, that is, pry up on the edge of the cap until the cap is loosened, turn the jar and repeat the operation if necessary, until the cap is entirely disengaged.

Attention is called to the fact that the jaw carried by the handle 12 and the jaw carried by the bar 20 are of exactly the same form so that these jaws may be made in quantities and used indifferently either upon the end of the bar 20 or upon the handle 2. It will be seen also that I have provided one pivot for the two handles and for the pawl and that the pawl has three functions, namely locking the bar 20 in its adjusted positions, holding the jaws in alinement when the pawl is locked and also guiding the bar 20 when the pawl is raised.

It will be obvious that the device may be made in a number of different sizes and is capable of other uses than opening can tops.

I claim:-

1. An implement of the character described having two handles having interfitting heads pivoted to each other, one of the heads being angular, the free end of the angular portion carrying a jaw movable longitudinally of the other head in the general direction of the handles upon relative movement of the handles, a longitudinal- 11 1y adjustable bar and extending in the general direction of the handles carried by the second named head, and a jaw carried thereby and confronting the first named head.

2. An implement of the character described, including two handles having hollow heads, each head being angularly disposed with relation to the corresponding handle and one head fitting within the other head, one of said heads being pivoted at its extremity to the other head at the junction of the other head with the handle, the first named head carrying a. jaw at its end remote from said pivot, a bar longitudinally movable through said heads, extending in the general direction of the handles and carrying a jaw confronting the first-named jaw, and means carried by one of said handles but independently movable with relation thereto for holding the bar in any adjusted positions.

3. An implement of the character described, including two handles having hollow heads, each head being angularly disposed with relation to the corresponding handle and one head fitting within the other head, one of said heads being pivoted at its extremity to the other head at the junction of the other head with the handle, the first named head carrying a jaw, a bar longitudinally movable through said heads and carrying a jaw confronting the first-named jaw, and means for holding the bar in any adjusted positions, including a pawl pivotally mounted upon the pivot point for said head, the longitudinally movable bar having teeth with which said pawl is adapted to engage.

4. An implement of the character described, including two handles having hollow heads, each head being angularly disposed with relation to the corresponding handle and one head fitting within the other head, one of said heads being pivoted at it extremity to the other head at the junction of the other head with the handle, the first named head carrying a jaw, a bar longitudinally movable through said heads and carrying a jaw confronting the first-named jaw, means for holding the bar in any adjusted positions including a pawl pivotally mounted upon the pivot point for said head, the longitudinally movable bar having teeth with which said pawl is adapted to engage, and a single springurging the handles away from each other and urging the pawl into engagement with the bar.

5. An implement of the character described including a member, a handle having a head pivoted to said member, a jaw carried loosely upon the last named head for limited free movement in a plurality of directions, a bar longitudinally adjustable through and with relation to said heads and extending in the general direction of the handle, and having a jaw confronting said first named jaw, and means for holding said bar in adjusted relation.

6. An implement of the character described, including two handles, each having an angularly disposed head, the head comprising two opposed' plates, the head of one handle fitting between the plates forming the head of the other handle, a pivot pin extending through one corner of the inner head and through the outer head at the junction of the head with the handle, the last named head having an oilset portion adjacent its free end, a jaw having a shank extending loosely in said offset portion, means loosely engaging said shank with the offset portion of the head whereby the shank may freely shift into a plurality of positions, a bar extending longitudinally through the inner head and having ratchet teeth, the extremity of the bar being provided with a jaw confronting the first named jaw, and a pawl pivoted upon said pivot bolt and engaging the ratchet teeth of the bar, the pawl having a handle, and a spring engaging said pawl and engaging against the handle of the outer head and urging said handles apart and the pawl into engagement with the teeth on the bar.

7. An implement of the character described, having two handles having interfitting heads pivoted to each other, one of the heads carrying a jaw movable longitudinally of the other head upon movement of the handles, a longitudinally adjustable bar extending through the heads, and a jaw carried upon the end of the bar and confronting the first-named jaw, said jaw on the bar having a shank disposed parallel to the bar and notched at its extremity, the bar having a I lug extending into said notch, and a rivet passing through the shank of the jaw and through the bar.

3. An implement of the character described, including two handles having interfitting hollow heads pivoted to each other, one of the heads having an offset portion, a longitudinally adjustable bar extending through the heads, the extremity of the bar having an angularly disposed lug, and jaws adapted to be disposed in confronting relation to each other, each of said jaws having a shank angularly disposed with relation to the jaw and having a notch in its extremity and having an opening through the shank, the shank of one jaw being adapted to receive the lug on the bar and a pivot bolt holding the jaw in place, the shank of the other jaw being adapted to be disposed in said offset portion, and the oil'set portion having a lug extending inward and loose- 1y engaging in the hole through the shank whereby said jaws may be interchanged.

CORRY E. McNEMAR.

not

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2448815 *Oct 23, 1944Sep 7, 1948Mattocks Edgar HScrew cover wrench
US2507789 *May 8, 1946May 16, 1950Jessup Sellers EReciprocating jaw jar wrench
US2520905 *Oct 1, 1946Sep 5, 1950Borrelli Elmer FShears
US2669141 *Jun 29, 1951Feb 16, 1954Davis Edgar BSliding jaw screw cap jar wrench
US2669142 *Jul 28, 1952Feb 16, 1954Fuller Clarence WCam operated sliding jaw closure remover
US2913938 *Jun 6, 1957Nov 24, 1959Yorba Robert PCap-removing tool
US3822614 *Jun 19, 1972Jul 9, 1974Kovacevic RTool for use as jar and bottle opener
US7367248 *Oct 23, 2006May 6, 2008Moha Moderne Haushaltwaren AgScrewtop opener
Classifications
U.S. Classification81/3.42, 81/314, 7/151, D08/39
International ClassificationB67B7/00, B67B7/18
Cooperative ClassificationB67B7/18
European ClassificationB67B7/18