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Publication numberUS1968126 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1934
Filing dateDec 29, 1932
Priority dateDec 29, 1932
Publication numberUS 1968126 A, US 1968126A, US-A-1968126, US1968126 A, US1968126A
InventorsAndrew J Center
Original AssigneeAndrew J Center
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil burner
US 1968126 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jqly 31, 1934. J, R 1,968,126

OIL BURNER Filed Dec. 29, 1932 I. 'ENTOR,

i atented July 31, 1934 7 oNiT EDsures mi-m OFFlCE r on. BURNER 7 Andrew J. Center, Laredo, Tex. v Application December 29, 1932, Serial No. 649,403

4' Claims (01. 299 -118") "This invention relates to improvements in burnersin which oil and air or steam are atomized and'rnixed forthorough combustion.

The primary obje'c't 'of my invention is to'pro- -15 vide a new and improved oil burner of the above kind embodying anatomizing structure including a rotatable impeller at the burner tip which is ac'tuated by the flowing oil and air or steam acting against the vanes thereof Another "object is to provide a burner of the above character from which the oil and air or steam are discharged in the form of a whirling hollowspray and thoroughly atomized and mixed, and which the'impelleris eifectively lubricated 15 by the fuel o'i-l. 'f'

A further object is to provide a burner of the above character which extremely simple and durable in construction and highly efficient in operationj I 1 The invention 'consists the novel form, combinatien and arrangement of parts hereinafter more fully described, shownin theacc'ompanying drawing, and claimed.

ih the d'rawingz Figure 1 is a side elevation of an oil burner embodying the present invention, partly broken away.

Figure 2 is an enlarged central longitudinal section thereof.

39 Figure 3 is an end elevation looking toward the right of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a transverse section on line 4=-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a transverse section on line 5-5 of Figure 2; and

Figure 6 is a side elevation of the impeller.

Referring in detail to the drawing, 5 indicates an outer tube having a tubular burner tip 6 threaded on one end, and a fitting 7 threaded on the other end whose inlet port 8' is adapted for connection with a source of supply of steam or air under pressure. Arranged in spaced concentric relation to and within the outer tube 5 is a fuel conducting tube 9 having threaded engagement at one end in a recess 10 of the fitting '7 in line with another inlet port 11 adapted for connection with a source of oil supply.

The burner tip 6 has an internal beveled valve seat 12 intermediate its ends, and the bore of the burner tip at the discharge end is flared or tapered outwardly as at 13. Arranged in the tip 6 is a valve 14 adapted to seat inwardly against the valve seat 12 and provided with a hollow inwardly extending stem 15 adjustably threaded into the outer end of the oil conducting tube 9 and supported in line with the latter by a perfor'ated disk 16 sli'dably fitted-in the inner end portion of burner tip '6. The valve 14 has cutwardly diverging ports 17 therethrough leading "outwardlyfrom the outer end of hollow stem 15. Projecting outwardly from valve 14 is a stub shaft 18- on'wZhic'his journaled a conical impeller 19 arranged in the conical outer portion of the bore-of burner tip '6 and having longitudinal 'sp'irally extending peripheral vanes 20.- A :spacer sleeve 21 isarrangedon theouter end of-stubshaft l8 be'tween thehub of impeller 1'9 and azfia't washer 22 'secured against the outer end of shaft 1 8 by a stub screw 23. The inner portion of shaft 18 has an axial passage 24 which communicates at its inner end with the bore of :stem 15 and which-leads to a radial passage 25 opening through the periphery :cf shaftkts intermediate the ends of impeller 19 Itwill be seen that by applying a wrench to the head of stud screw 23,1the unit composed :of valve 114, fhcllow stem 15 and stub shaft 18 :may

be turned so as to thread stem 15 intoadriout \Of the 'conducting tub'efiilfanditherebyadtiust the valve 14 relative to its seat 12 so that the space 30 between the latter will permit the desired flow of air or steam into and from the discharge end of burner tip 6. It will be further seen that a properly controlled flow of oil will be had through conducting tube 9, hollow stem 15, and diverging 5 ports 1'7, the oil issuing from ports 17 mixing with the hollow spray of air passing the valve 14 and acting with said air, or steam if used instead of air, upon the vanes 20 of impeller 19 so as to rapidly rotate the latter. The use of ex ternal power for rotating the impeller is thus rendered unnecessary, and the impeller causes the thorough mixture of oil and air to issue in a whirling hollow spray with the oil thoroughly atomized. The impeller is effectively lubricated by the fuel oil passing through passages 24 and 25 and then between the coacting surfaces of stub'shaft 18 and the hub of impeller 19.

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that I have provided a very simple and durable form of atomizing burner which will give exceptionally good results even when using very heavy grades of fuel oil, the whirling air or steam and oil being atomized and thoroughly mixed so as to produce a highly combustible mixture capable of producing an exceptionally hot flame. Minor changes are contemplated within the spirit and scope of the invention as claimed.

What I claim as new is:

1. An oil burner comprising an outer air or H0 steam conducting tube having a burner tip at the discharge end thereof provided with an internal valve seat, the bore of said burner tip being flared outwardly from said valve seat, an oil conducting tube arranged in spaced concentric relation to and within said outer tube, a valve cooperating with said valve seat and having an inwardly projecting hollow stem communicating with and in adjustable threaded engagement with the discharge end of the oil conducting tube, said valve having diverging ports therethrough communicating with the interior of the hollow stem, a stub shaft projecting outwardly from said valve, means to facilitate turning of the stub shaft and the stem for adjusting said valve toward or from said valve seat, and a tapered impeller journaled on said stub shaft within the flared outer bore portion of the burner tip.

2. An oil burner comprising an outer air or steam conducting tube having a burner tip at the discharge end thereof provided with an internal valve seat, the bore of said burner tip being flared outwardly from said valve seat, an oil conducting tube arranged in spaced concentric relation to and within said outer tube, a valve cooperating with said valve seat and having an inwardly projecting hollow stem communicating with and in adjustable threaded engagement with the discharge end of the oil conducting tube, said valve having diverging ports therethrough communicating With the interior of the hollow stem, a stub shaft projecting outwardly from said valve, means to facilitate turning of the stub shaft and the stem for adjusting said valve toward or from said valve seat, and a tapered impeller journaled on said stub shaft within the flared outer bore portion of the burner tip, said stub shaft having communicating axial and radial bores leading from the bore of the hollow stem to a point intermediate the ends of the stub shaft and the impeller for conducting fuel oil between the coacting surfaces of said stub shaft and said impeller for lubricating the same.

3. 'An oil burner comprising an outer air or steam conducting tube having a burner tip at the discharge end thereof provided with an internal valve seat, the bore of said burner tip being flared outwardly from said valve seat, an oil conducting tube arranged in spaced concentric relation to and within said outer tube, a valve cooperating with said valve seat and having an inwardly projecting hollow stem communicating with and in adjustable threaded engagement with the discharge end of the oil conducting tube,' said valve having diverging ports therethrough communicating with the interior of the hollow stem, a stub shaft projecting outwardly from said valve, a tapered impeller journaled on said stub shaft within the flared outer bore portion of the burner tip, and means on the outer end of the stub shaft to facilitate turning of the hollow stem so as to adjust the valve relative to said valve seat.

4. An oil burner comprising an outer air conducting tube having a burner tip at its discharge end provided with an internal beveled valve seat, an oil conducting tube arranged in spaced concentric relation to and within the outer air conducting tube, a valve cooperating with said seat and having a hollow inwardly projecting stem 1 00 adjustably threaded into the discharge end of the oil conducting tube, said valve having diverging ports therethrough leading from the bore of said hollow stem, a stub shaft projecting outwardly from the valve within the outer end por- 105 tion of the burner tip, a bladed impeller journaled on said stub shaft, means exteriorly of the burner tip and carried by the stub shaft to facilitate threading of the hollow stem into or out of the oil conducting tube so as to adjust the valve rela- 11o tive to said seat, said burner tip having a cylindrical inner bore portion, and a perforated disk carried by the outer end portion of the hollow stem and slidably engaged in said cylindrical bore portion of the burner tip for sustaining the 115 hollow stem, the valve, and the stub shaft coaxial with the oil conducting tube.

J. CENTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441565 *Nov 14, 1945May 18, 1948Lee Corwin HarryFog nozzle
US2503723 *Aug 17, 1944Apr 11, 1950Richard WunnFog nozzle
US2505582 *Mar 5, 1946Apr 25, 1950Jane Unger DoloresTurbine sprinkler
US2589942 *Mar 8, 1949Mar 18, 1952Jr John O HrubyNozzle
US2657024 *Mar 22, 1950Oct 27, 1953Marshall C ReineckeAir and liquid mixing device
US3123304 *Feb 2, 1962Mar 3, 1964 sutton
US4509690 *Dec 6, 1982Apr 9, 1985The Cornelius CompanyCarbonated beverage mixing nozzle for a dispenser
US4580723 *Mar 31, 1982Apr 8, 1986Fluidcarbon International AbMethod for atomizing dispersions or solutions containing particles
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/383, 239/430, 239/405
International ClassificationF23D11/04
Cooperative ClassificationF23D11/04
European ClassificationF23D11/04